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St Bees Priory

St Bees Priory Graveslab

The atmospheric church at St Bees is all that remains of a small Benedictine monastery closed down during the reformation. The priory is associated with the legend of St Bega, who is said to have fled here to escape an arranged marriage in Ireland. Read More »

St Beuno's Church and Chapel

St Beuno's Church and Chapel

In Clynnog Fawr, the shrine to Saint Bueno is a disproportionately large church for the size of the village, it dominates the area, and it’s probably one of the most important churches in North Wales. Read More »

St Canna's Stone (aka St Canna's Chair) & Fynnon Ganna (Canna's Holy Well)

St Canna (Born 510AD) founded churches at both Llangan and Llanganna, though she is thought to have maintained her residence at Llangan (Llang-gan) in Carmarthenshire (not to be confused with Llangan in the Vale of Glamorgan). It is here in Llangan that we find her church and records of a holy well and a cubical shaped stone inscribed with the name 'Carina' that were associated with the saint. Read More »

St Clements Church , Rodel

St Clements Church

This gloomy atmospheric church, dating from the sixteenth century, is dedicated to St Clement, who was a bishop of Dunblane parish. Read More »

St Ethelbert’s Holy Well

Around 794AD, King Offa of Mercia demanded the head of the Christian King Ethelbert of East Anglia whilst he was making arrangements to marry Offa's daughter. Not far from the location of Marden Church the young king was assassinated and his body hidden. After rumours of Ethelbert's ghost being seen in the marden area, Offa asked the Pope for absolution. Read More »

St Fillan's Chair and Well Dunfillan

A rocky seat on top of the Dunfillan, is the place where St Fillan is said to have sat and blessed the surrounding lands. The chair was thought to be able to heal rheumatism of the back, although you had to be dragged back down the hill by your legs to affect a cure. This would certainly cause enough bruising to allow you to forget about your rheumatism for a while. Read More »

St Govan's Chapel

This tiny chapel hidden in a deep ravine in the rocks dates from the thirteenth century. There may have been a chapel or religious structure here in the fifth century making it one of the earliest places of Christian worship. It has been suggested that the chapel was part of a larger Hermitage but its history is unclear. Read More »

St Keyne

St Keyne

The holy well in the village is connected with a 5th century virgin called St Keyne who performed miracles.

St Machar's Cathedral

St Machar's Cathedral-09

Still referred to as a Cathedral, St Machar's has not held a Bishop's seat since the Reformation and is in reality a high kirk. Legend has it that St Machar was informed by God to find a place where a river bends like a bishops crozier and then to establish a church there. Hence in 580 St Machar founded his church in Aberdeen where the River Don flows upon such a route. Read More »

St Margaret's Well, Edinburgh

St Margaret's Well, Edinburgh

During the 1860 St Margaret's Well was moved to its present location from the crossroads between Holyrood and Restalrig. It was described in 1852 as 'a spring well, enclosed by an ancient vault over which part of the railway workshops had been built.' Read More »

St Mary’s Church, Barnetby-le-Wold

The church of St Mary’s on Church Hill in Barnetby-le-Wold dates from Saxon times though the current building is rebuilt during the Norman era. The church was actually declared redundant and closed in 1972 soo you cannot visit it without making special arrangements. One special item of note regarding St Mary’s was its lead font which dated from the early 12th century. Read More »

St Michael and All Angels Parish Church, Arthuret

Though the current Gothic style church dates from 1609, the parish had a church dating from 1150, served by Jedburgh Abbey's monks and it is thought that there was a church on the site as early as the 6th century. Back in the 16th century this area on the border of Scotland between the Solway Firth and Langholm was known as the debatable lands and populated by the Border Reiver families. Read More »

St Michael's Holy Well, Kirkmichael

St Michael's Holy Well in Kirkmichael had a tradition of having magical healing powers and was said to have been protected by a guardian spirit in the form of a fly. According to The Statistical Account of Scotland (1794), "Near the kirk of this parish there is a fountain, once highly celebrated, and anciently dedicated to St Michael. Read More »

St Michael's Mount

St Michaels Mount 1

St Michael's Mount is a picturesque rocky island that has been described as the 'Jewel in Cornwall's crown' - perhaps a reason for its popularity with visitors. Read More »

St Moluag's Church

St Moluag's Church Interior

This small and ancient church has a plethora of legends and traditions associated with it, making it one of the most important mysterious sites on the Isle of Lewis. Read More »

St Mullins Monastery and Holy Well

Originally known as Rinn Ros Broic (Badgers Wood Point), Kennedy’s Field and Achadh-Cainidh, St Mullins is the site where St Moling built his monastery during the 7th Century. Read More »

St Nectan's Glen

St Nectan's Glen, classical labyrinth

This beautiful glen is home to two rock cut labyrinths of classical (Cretan) design next to a watermill in rocky valley. Each carving is about 12 inches across its face.

There is some conjecture about their origin. They may date from the Bronze Age or Iron Age period, but are more likely to be the work of a local miller in the eighteenth century. Read More »

St Neot Holy Well

The holy well at St Neot was once said to be the home of two holy fishes.

There is a story attached to these fish, it is said that one of the local priests had a vision, in which an angel told him that if he took one fish from the well every day to eat, there would always be a replacement the next day. Read More »

St Nidan's Old Church and The Thigh Stone

St Nidan’s Church in Llanidan is associated with a stone that had strange magical like properties including aiding fertilisation and having the power to move on its own.  Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins (1881) mentions that ‘The old British historian Nennius speaks of a stone, one of the wonders of the Isle Read More »

St Non's Chapel and St David's Peninsula

St David's Peninsula is supposedly the landing place of Twrch Trwyth, the magical boar told in the story of Culhwch and Olwen in the Mabinogion, King Arthur features heavily in the story. It is also the place where St Patrick is said to have sailed for Ireland to convert them to Christianity. Read More »

St Oswald's Church, Winwick

St Oswald, King of Northumbria (Born 604 – Died 5 August 642) was killed during the Battle of Maserfield (Maserfelth) against the pagan Mercian King Penda (Died 15 November 655). Read More »

St Oswald’s Holy Well, Winwick

St Oswald’s Well is Grade II listed and can be found a mile north of St Oswald's Church, Winwick in a field beside the A573. Read More »

St Osyth’s Fountain

Some wells in Britain are associated with the beheading of their patron saint, examples of which include the case of St Winifred, St Fremund, St Juthware and St Osyth. Read More »

St Patrick's Well

Around 450AD St Patrick, patron saint of Ireland is supposed to have preached on the banks of Ullswater in Cumbria. The whole Patterdale area is named after him. In Glenridding a Holy Well dedicated to St Patrick can still be found roughly one mile outside of the village of Glenridding. Read More »

St Patrick’s Chair and Well

St Patrick’s Chair and Well (also known as the Druids Chair and Well or St Brigid’s Well or St Brigit’s Well) lies within Altadeven Wood, not far from the Ulster Way footpath. The chair is a huge 2m high stone block, shaped like a throne. Read More »



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