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Spinsters Rock

Spinsters Rock is a burial cairn dating to the early Bronze Age. The structure was re-erected in the 1862 after collapsing earlier in the year.

According to folklore the rocks where erected by a group of three spinsters who where on a journey to deliver some wool. Obviously these three women where seen as giants having the strength to carry such a heavy burden. Read More »

Spirit of Portland: Revelations of a Sacred Isle by Gary Biltcliffe

Spirit of Portland

Intrigued by The Da Vinci Code and Angels and Demons? Gary Biltcliffe has been studying the Isle of Portland in Dorset for many years and reveals some ground-breaking discoveries in this book, including a secret Masonic code found in Portland’s churches left as clues by 19th-century Freemasons. Read More »

Spynie Palace

Spynie Palace

Spynie Palace was the seat of the bishops of Moray for over 500 years; the atmospheric ruins now a shell of its former glory. The Palace - like many old historical buildings - has its share of traditions and ghost stories. Read More »

St Aelhaearn’s Church

St Aelhaearn’s Church

Located in the village of Llanaelhaearn, the church is named after Aelhaearn, a disciple of Saint Beuno who travelled to the area in the 5th and 6th Centuries. In Wales this period was known as the ‘Age of Saints’ but in England, as ‘The Dark Ages’. Read More »

St Aelhaearn’s Well

St Aelhaearn’s Well

This well can be found on the outskirts of the village of Llanaelhaearn, on the left hand side of the road as you ascend the (B4417) out of the village. It is enclosed in a locked stone structure which was constructed in 1900, and it is in front of a house called Bryn Iddon. Read More »

St Albans Abbey

St Alban's Abbey

St Albans has a multitude of ghosts and strange stories, many of which are attached to the magnificent abbey. St Albans has been occupied from very early in its history, the Roman town of Verulamium once stood in the valley, in the area where the public park now lies. Read More »

St Alkelda's Well, Middleham

St Alkeda was a chaste Saxon maiden, sometimes described as a princess, noble woman or a nun. On 28th March 800AD, somewhere close to the site of St Mary’s and St Alkelda’s Church, she was strangled to death for her faith by two Danish women involved in a Viking raid. It has been suggested that they killed her by twisting a napkin around her neck. Read More »

St Andrews Cathedral

Kilrimont changed its name to St Andrews when relics of the saint were brought here by Bishop Acca of Hexam in 732AD, although there is a folklore tradition that suggests the relics found there way to Read More »

St Andrew’s Church, Banwell

The following article entitled ‘The Glory of Banwell Church’, edited by Jill Bailey, was originally published on 28 September 1963 and republished in the The Weston Mercury on 23 May 2008. Read More »

St Anthony's Well, Edinburgh

Prior to 1674 St Anthony’s Well flowed from beneath a small stone arch in a slightly higher position to the bolder from under which it now sprouts. It was probably connected to the nearby 15th century St Anthony’s Chapel which is now a ruin. Read More »

St Augustines Well, Cerne Abbas

St Augustines Well, Cerne Abbas

All the following details were made available on the information board inside the burial ground situated above St Augustine's Well; Read More »

St Barruc’s Chapel

St Barruc is said to have been buried on Barry Island, possibly at the chapel which was dedicated to him. The ruins of this chapel are on Friar’s Road overlooking Jackson Bay. Read More »

St Bees Priory

St Bees Priory Graveslab

The atmospheric church at St Bees is all that remains of a small Benedictine monastery closed down during the reformation. The priory is associated with the legend of St Bega, who is said to have fled here to escape an arranged marriage in Ireland. Read More »

St Beuno's Church and Chapel

St Beuno's Church and Chapel

In Clynnog Fawr, the shrine to Saint Bueno is a disproportionately large church for the size of the village, it dominates the area, and it’s probably one of the most important churches in North Wales. Read More »

St Canna's Stone (aka St Canna's Chair) & Fynnon Ganna (Canna's Holy Well)

St Canna (Born 510AD) founded churches at both Llangan and Llanganna, though she is thought to have maintained her residence at Llangan (Llang-gan) in Carmarthenshire (not to be confused with Llangan in the Vale of Glamorgan). It is here in Llangan that we find her church and records of a holy well and a cubical shaped stone inscribed with the name 'Carina' that were associated with the saint. Read More »

St Catherine's Church, Barmby Moor

Dating from around 1272, St Catherine's Parish Church was largely rebuilt in 1850 replacing much of the original Norman building. In the churchyard, just south of the main door is a stone which has been speculated may have been a place of pagan worship. Read More »

St Clements Church , Rodel

St Clements Church

This gloomy atmospheric church, dating from the sixteenth century, is dedicated to St Clement, who was a bishop of Dunblane parish. Read More »

St Cuthbert’s Well, Bromfield

In 'The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England' by Robert Charles Hope (1893) we are informed that; ‘In the parish of Bromfield, in the neighbourhood of Blencogo, “on the common to the east of that village, not far from Ware-Brig, near a pretty large rock of granite, called St. Read More »

St Ethelbert’s Holy Well

Around 794AD, King Offa of Mercia demanded the head of the Christian King Ethelbert of East Anglia whilst he was making arrangements to marry Offa's daughter. Not far from the location of Marden Church the young king was assassinated and his body hidden. After rumours of Ethelbert's ghost being seen in the marden area, Offa asked the Pope for absolution. Read More »

St Fillan's Chair and Well Dunfillan

A rocky seat on top of the Dunfillan, is the place where St Fillan is said to have sat and blessed the surrounding lands. The chair was thought to be able to heal rheumatism of the back, although you had to be dragged back down the hill by your legs to affect a cure. This would certainly cause enough bruising to allow you to forget about your rheumatism for a while. Read More »

St Govan's Chapel

This tiny chapel hidden in a deep ravine in the rocks dates from the thirteenth century. There may have been a chapel or religious structure here in the fifth century making it one of the earliest places of Christian worship. It has been suggested that the chapel was part of a larger Hermitage but its history is unclear. Read More »

St John's Well, Harpham

The well of St John of Beverley can be found beside the road on the east side of Harpham. St John (died 7 May 721) was born in Beverley and on his feast day (7th May) it is decorated and a procession of the choir and congregation of Beverley Minster make their way to it from the church in Harpham. Read More »

St Johns Well, Sutton-on-the-Forest

According to The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893), ‘About a mile from the nunnery*, at the corner of the wood called St. John's Wood, was formerly an ancient building, consisting of a small dome of stone and brick over a spring, well known in the neighbourhood as "St. Read More »

St Keyne

St Keyne

The holy well in the village is connected with a 5th century virgin called St Keyne who performed miracles.

St Machar's Cathedral

St Machar's Cathedral-09

Still referred to as a Cathedral, St Machar's has not held a Bishop's seat since the Reformation and is in reality a high kirk. Legend has it that St Machar was informed by God to find a place where a river bends like a bishops crozier and then to establish a church there. Hence in 580 St Machar founded his church in Aberdeen where the River Don flows upon such a route. Read More »



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