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Ffynnon Dyfnog, St. Dyfnog’s Well, Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch

Situated in a copse approximately 200 yards West of Eglwys St. Dyfnog, with access via a gate in the graveyard, is Ffynnon Dyfnog, (the well of Saint Dyfnog) which is a rectangular stone bath (18 inches deep) fed by a spring. Read More »

Ffynnon Elian (St. Elian's Well)

St Elian’s Well, like most Holy Well’s was associated with having healing properties until around 1723 when it developed a reputation for being a cursing well. Thought to have sprang forth to quench the thirst of St Elian in the 6th century, the well was a source of pilgrimage for many centuries. Read More »

Ffynnon Enddwyn

Ffynnon Enddwyn is a Holy Well or Sacred Spring in the Merionethshire area of Gwynedd. The information sign at the well states:- Read More »

Ffynnon Fair (St. Mary’s Well), Bryncroes

This well can be found on the roadside in the village of Bryncroes. It is on, what was the main pilgrim route to Bardsey Island through the Lleyn Peninsula. Bryncroes was the probably the final stop for pilgrims heading to embark from Aberdaron. Read More »

Ffynnon Fair (St. Mary’s Well), Aberdaron

Ffynnon Fair can be found on the shore to the east of the precipitous rocks rising out of the sea known locally as ‘the wall’. This well always gives fresh water even though it is often covered over by the sea. It is said that a wish can be fulfilled by running with a mouthful of the water, three times around the quadrangle of the nearby St. Mary’s church. Read More »

Ffynnon Fair (St. Mary’s Well), Llanbedr

Sited within the village of Llanbedr, this well is now just a dried up, empty sunken tank.

Ffynnon Fair (St. Mary’s Well), Llwyn-y-pia

Ffynnon Fair is a holy well situated outside the village of Llwyn-y-pia. The well is the oldest recorded Christian site in the Rhondda. Some historians date the site back further, and it could be pagan in origin. The water from the well is reputed to cure ailments, especially rheumatism and poor eyesight. Rhisiart ap Rhys wrote: Read More »

Ffynnon Fyw (Well of Life)

Ffynnon Fyw is a well within a stone wall enclosure of about 7.3m squared. There is evidence of steps for bathing access. It is said the well was dedicated to Curig and tradition credits it with the belief that it restores sight to the blind and health to the sick.

Ffynnon Tegla (St Tegla’s Well)

Ffynnon Tegla, (or St Tegla’s or St Tecla’s Well) can be found on private land* near the River Alyn in Llandegla (Llandegla-yn-Iâl). Read More »

The Five Barrows

This Bronze Age barrow cemetery consists of eight barrows, despite what the name of the site suggests. It is thought that the barrows were constructed over a long period of time perhaps as much as 500 years, suggesting the site may have been seen as a special place, reserved for the important members of the community. Read More »

Flowers Barrow

An Iron Age hillfort above Lulworth Cove seems to have been taken over by the Romans when they invaded. The area is said to be haunted by phantom Roman soldiers seen several times over the years. Traditionally they are said to appear at times of national crisis. They have also been seen at Bindon Hill and Knowle hill.

Directions: Read More »

Fonlief Hir Stone C

Found on the side of the road just before the road forks off to Moel Goedog hillfort, this standing stone is 1 metre tall and leans over slightly towards the West.

Fonlief Hir Stone D

This standing stone looks more like a boulder on the side of the road; it is short and squat, 0.9 metres high by 0.6 metres by 0.5 metres. It can be found between the two tracks at the junction where the road forks off to Moel Goedog hillfort.

Fortingall Yew Tree

Fortingall Yew Tree

The ancient remains of the yew tree which survives within its own walled enclosure in Fortingall Churchyard is claimed to be the oldest living tree in Europe. Read More »

Freezing Hill, Bath

Landsdown Hill, Tog Hill and Freezing Hill were the site of the English Civil War Battle of Lansdowne (Lansdown), which was fought on 5 July 1643. The Parliamentarian force under Sir William Waller (Born C 1597 – Died 19 September 1668) was forced to retreat by the Royalist troops led by Lord Ralph Hopton, 1st Baron Hopton (Born March 1596 – Died September 1652). Read More »

Fynnon Galchog (The Lime Well)

This natural spring is situated on flat ground on the northern side of the headland of Great Orme. It is said that it never runs dry, even in times out drought. The water from the well is also said to be beneficial in the development of strong bones and teeth in children. There is an old story linked to this well. Read More »

Fynnon Powell (Powell’s Well)

This spring on the Great Orme is a water source that doesn’t seem to dry up, even in the driest weather. There is a story associated with the well, which tells of its mysterious formation. Many years ago, the Powell family lived in a dwelling close to where the well is now situated. Read More »

Gallarus Oratory

Gallarus Oratory Front

Ireland has a history of early Christian settlement dating as far back as the 6th century when monastic settlements were developed as bastions of the faith in the remote Irish countryside. Gallarus Oratory is the oldest and best preserved example of an early church that served one of these small settlements, and is probably one of the oldest intact buildings in Ireland. Read More »

Gallows Hill, Ivinghoe

Gallows Hill stands 615 feet above sea level and it is thought to have the remains of a Bronze Age barrow on it, bones from which were discovered in the 19th century. At one post medieval time the hill is said to have mounted a gallows from which it gets its name.  It is from this time that the story of its haunting is thought to derive from. Read More »

Garn Boduan Hill Fort

Garn Boduan (279 metres in height) is an Iron Age hill fort situated on a steep isolated volcanic hill to the south of Nefyn. The site was surveyed during the 1950’s, when the remains of more than one hundred and seventy round houses, (of which the remains of about one hundred are identifiable whilst on the ground) were discovered. Read More »

Garn Fadryn Hill Fort

Garn Fadryn (371 metres in height), has on its summit a Middle Iron Age hillfort covering an area of approximately twenty-six acres in total. The hill fort construction seems to have been done in stages, the first stage taking place in around 300BC enclosing about twelve acres. Read More »

Giant's Graves

Giant's Graves

The Giant's Graves are actually early Bronze Age horned galley graves with a central chamber. The covering mound has long since weathered away, leaving the inner chamber as a jumble of upright stones standing over a narrow stone lined depression in the ground. Read More »

Giants Stone of Tweedsmuir

Three ancient stones on the road to Fruid Reservoir from Tweedsmuir are linked with the legend and death of Jack the Giantkiller. Read More »

Giggleswick

The ebbing and flowing well: legend tells how a nymph was being chased by a satyr who was overcome with lust. The nymph prayed to the gods and was saved by being turned into a well - famous for healing. The only thing that remained of the nymph was her eternal breath that causes the well to ebb and flow like the tides. Read More »

Glastonbury

Glastonbury Tor Landscape

Glastonbury has been identified with the mysterious Isle of Avalon from the twelfth century, its past has become steeped in myth and legend, and it is probably most famous for its Arthurian and early Christian traditions. Read More »



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