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Burial Mounds

Dinton Castle

In 2012 the folly known as Dinton Castle was sold at auction and some newspapers (including the Daily Mail and Read More »

Dyffryn Ardudwy Cromlechs

Dyffryn Ardudwy Cromlechs

Behind the local school at Dyffryn Ardudwy and reached by a sign posted footpath two exposed cromlechs are visible amidst a field of stones. The cromlechs are about twenty feet apart and the stones that surround them mark the remains of the huge cairn that would have covered these graves that date back to the Neolithic period. Read More »

Eamont Bridge and Arthur's Round Table

Arthurs Round Table

Two prehistoric henge monuments have become known as Arthur's Round Table, a common theme in folklore were ancient structures become romanticised into legendary sites.  A cave near Eamont Bridge called giants cave is associated with two legendary giants called Tarquin and Isir. Read More »

The Five Barrows

This Bronze Age barrow cemetery consists of eight barrows, despite what the name of the site suggests. It is thought that the barrows were constructed over a long period of time perhaps as much as 500 years, suggesting the site may have been seen as a special place, reserved for the important members of the community. Read More »

Frensham Common Round Barrows

There is a group of four Round Barrows on Frensham Common. Three are clustered close to each other and the fourth is found roughly 150 meters to the north of them.

Gallows Hill, Ivinghoe

Gallows Hill stands 615 feet above sea level and it is thought to have the remains of a Bronze Age barrow on it, bones from which were discovered in the 19th century. At one post medieval time the hill is said to have mounted a gallows from which it gets its name.  It is from this time that the story of its haunting is thought to derive from. Read More »

Giant's Graves

Giant's Graves

The Giant's Graves are actually early Bronze Age horned galley graves with a central chamber. The covering mound has long since weathered away, leaving the inner chamber as a jumble of upright stones standing over a narrow stone lined depression in the ground. Read More »

Giants Stone of Tweedsmuir

Three ancient stones on the road to Fruid Reservoir from Tweedsmuir are linked with the legend and death of Jack the Giantkiller. Read More »

Gwern Einion

Gwern Einion is a representative cromlech, found on Gwern Einion Farm in the district of Llanfair, Meirionnydd. It has been damaged over the centuries, the burial chamber has historically been used as a shed, and the cairn has been robbed of its stone to build dry stone walls. It has actually been incorporated into a dry stone wall of the garden of a now derelict cottage on the farm. Read More »

Hambledon Hill

Originally the hill served as the site of a Middle Neolithic Causeway Camp, such as the one at Windmill Hill in Avebury. The camp was enclosed by causeway ditches to the Eastern end of the hillside, perhaps protected by wooden palisades, evidence suggests the camp was attacked by archers in an inter tribal skirmish. Read More »

The Hill of Tara

The Hill of Tara – ancient seat of the Kings of Ireland – is the focal point in a complex landscape of ancient monuments dating from the Neolithic to the Iron Age. It is a stirring setting where mythology and history fuse together, and has been revered as a holy site for thousands of years. Read More »

Kilmartin Linear Cemetery

Central stone in the Nether Largie group

The Kilmartin Valley is home to one of the most varied collections of prehistoric sites in the whole of Scotland. Bronze Age cairns, Neolithic chambered tombs, and enigmatic rock carvings, can all be found within a two-mile radius from Kilmartin village. Read More »

Kit's Coty House

Dating from between dated to between 4300 and 3000 BC, Kit's Coty House (or Kit's Coty) is all that remains of a Neolithic chambered long barrow on Blue Bell Hill.

Knebworth House

Knebworth has a number of legends and ghost stories, it was home to Sir Bulwer Lytton, the Victorian author with an avid interest in the occult. He was certainly involved with many people who were major players in occult thought from that time, including Eliphas Levi, the famous French Magus who visited Knebworth on several occasions. Read More »


Knockinarea is the name of the prominent mountain on the Cuil Irra peninsula to the west of Sligo, County Sligo. The name of the hill has been interpreted as: The Hill of the King, The Hill of the Moon and The Hill of the Executioner amongst other things, and dominates the views from miles around. Read More »

Knowlton Henges

Knowlton Henges

The area around Knowlton formed a major ritual site in the Neolithic period, the main focus being three Neolithic henge earthworks. Two have long since been ploughed and weathered away, but one remains with the ruin of a twelfth century Norman church at its centre, probably some form of controlling pagan sites by the early church. Read More »

La Hogue Bie

La Hogue Bie

La Hogue Bie is a major Neolitic ritual site dating back to 3500BC and one of the best preserved cruciform passage graves in Europe. Its passage is twenty meters long and is covered by a 12.2 meter high earth mound. The mound istelf is 58 meters in diameter and covers an area of 2400 square meters. Read More »

Lanyon Quoit

Lanyon Quoit

Also known as The Giants Table, Lanyon Quoit is a Neolithic burial mound dating back to 2500BC. The chambered tomb is made up of three upright granite blocks and a capstone, the covering mound has long since weathered away. Read More »

Llety’r Filiast

Llety'r Filiast translates into English as "The Lair of the Greyhound Bitch". It is a ruined Neolithic burial chamber situated on the Great Orme. Most of the stone from the cairn has been taken over the years, but it is thought that when it was originally built it would have measured thirty metres long and ten metres wide, and been vaguely egg shaped. Read More »

Lligwy Burial Chamber

The remains of the Lligwy Cromlech probably date from around 5000 BC (late Neolithic period). Access to the main central chamber would have been through a small narrow passage. The massive capstone (supported by eight smaller pillar stones), measures eighteen feet by fifteen feet, and is estimated to weigh twenty-five tons. Read More »

Mayburgh Henge (aka Mayborough Henge)

In 'Rude Stone Monuments In All Countries, Their Age And Uses' (1872) (which was later retitled 'Old Stone Monuments'), James Fergusson(1808-1886) gives the following description of Mayborough Henge. Read More »

Men-an Tol

Men-an Tol

Men-an-Tol, consist of a holed stone (with the largest hole of any British holed stone) between two upright stones, with other fallen stones nearby. The holed stone is considered to be the remains of an entrance to a chambered tomb. The whole structure having been covered with a mound of earth. As with many of these cromlechs it is difficult to image a mound covering them at any time. Read More »

Moel Goedog, East (Ring Cairn)

This is the remains of the easterly ring cairn (a Neolithic burial covered with stones); one of a pair situated close together in the Moel Goedog ancient monument complex situated the hills above Harlech close to Moel Goedog hillfort.

Moel Goedog, West (Ring Cairn)

This is the remains of the westerly ring cairn (a Neolithic burial covered with stones); one of a pair situated close together in the Moel Goedog ancient monument complex situated the hills above Harlech close to Moel Goedog hillfort.

The Longstone at Mottistone

Longstone at Mottistone

This impressive standing stone and its smaller recumbent companion, are believed to be all that is left of a chambered long barrow from the Neolithic period, the remaining stones once being part of the tomb entrance.   Read More »



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