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Burial Mounds


Poulnabrone Dolmen

Poulnabrone Dolmen

The Poulnabrone Dolmen is a portal tomb dating back to Neolithic times (2500BC). The thin capstone is about 12’ in length and is supported 6’ from the ground by two portal stones. Read More »

Scutchamer Knob (Cwichelmslaewe)

Scutchamer Knob (Cwichelmslaewe)

Within a small woodland adjacent to the ancient Ridgeway path, where it crosses the parish of East Hendred, stands Scutchamer Knob. It is a raised earth mound and legend has it, that it is the burial mound of the Saxon king Cwichelm. Read More »

Sheebeg Cairn

Sheebeg Cairn (Sí Beag) is traditionally considered to be the burial site of Gráinne, (daughter of Cormac mac Airt, High King of Ireland ) and the giant hero of Irish legend, Fionn Mac Cumhaill (or Finn McCool), leader of the Fianna warriors of Ben Bulben. Read More »

The Six Hills, Stevenage

The six hills which occupy prominence in the town are tumuli or Round Barrows dating from the Bronze Age. According to legend the hills are spade fulls of earth taken from Whomerly wood and thrown at the town by a giant (or the Devil) intent on destruction. His last shot went well off mark and knocked the steeple off Gravely Church two miles away. Read More »

Spinsters Rock

Spinsters Rock is a burial cairn dating to the early Bronze Age. The structure was re-erected in the 1862 after collapsing earlier in the year.

According to folklore the rocks where erected by a group of three spinsters who where on a journey to deliver some wool. Obviously these three women where seen as giants having the strength to carry such a heavy burden. Read More »

Steinacleit

This array of boulders marks what is left of a chambered cairn, and possibly shows the site was overlain by a huge hall. The site is 50 feet in diameter and oval in shape. The age of the site is debatable and according to different sources ranges from from 1800 - 1500 BC or 3000 - 1500 BC.

Directions: Steinacleit is at Siadar on the A857.

Stoney Littleton Long Barrow

This early Neolithic Long Barrow was constructed around 3700BC. The forecourt is flanked by two projecting horns, which frame the entrance to the passageway. The actual passageway extends under the mound for 48 feet and has 3 chambers on either side of the passage and 1 end chamber. These were found to contain a mixed group of bones some of them burned, from a number of different burials. Read More »

The Grey Cairns of Camster

The Camster Cairns are some of the best-preserved Neolithic burial mounds in Scotland. They date from around 3500BC, and are developed sites, in that they were used over a long period of time. Read More »

The Undreamed Region: Barrows In Folklore & Archaeology

Hills, mounds and burial sites. Places which have a timeless allure. Such places can be seen and regarded as mythically liminal, a place that it is not a place. A place outside of time. A place where the living freely walk with the dead. Barrows are just such places. Read More »

The West Kennet Long Barrow

West Kennet Long Barrow Sketch

West Kennet Long Barrow is one of the many prehistoric monuments that are part of the Avebury complex of Neolithic sites. It is one of the most impressive and well-preserved burial chambers in Britain, as well as being one of the most visited. Read More »

The West Kennet Long Barrow: Evidence of Occult Activities

Occult Symbol

[Please note the views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Mysterious Britain team]

To the average tourist the West Kennet Long Barrow is another ancient monument to look over and wonder at the way in which it was constructed, with numerous slabs of sarsen stone laid one upon another. Read More »

Trefal Stone

The following article by Nick Dermody about the Trefal Stone appeared on the BBC Wales website on 24 May 2012.

'Archaeologists are to exhume and analyse human bones found under a prehistoric monument only recently identified as a burial site cap. Read More »

Trethevy Quoit or King Arthur's Quoit

Trevethy Quoit

Trevethy Quoit, also known as King Arthur's Quoit, is one of the more impressive burial chambers in Cornwall. Standing at over 15 feet 4.6 Metres. This cromlech dates from the Bronze Age period. The capstone is pierced by a hole, the purpose of which is unknown. Read More »

Veryan

Five circular thatched houses, within the village are supposed to have been designed to ensure that the Devil cannot hide in any corners. Each house is topped with a cross, a further deterrent to the Devil. In actuality they were built by the Reverend Jeremiah Trist for his daughters. The houses are now in private ownership. Read More »

Wayland's Smithy

Wayland's Smithy

Wayland's Smithy is one of the most impressive and atmospheric Neolithic burial chambers in Britain. Read More »

Weeton Cairn Boggart

In the 1876 book entitled ‘History of the Fylde of Lancashire’ by John Porter, reference is made to an extensive barrow or cairn near Weeton Lane Heads which was accidentally opened. This burial chamber had the reputation of being haunted by a boggart or hairy ghost. Read More »

Whispering Knights

The remains of a portal dolmen burial chamber dating from around 4100BC the Whispering Knights can be as evocative as their name suggests, looming from the mist in the cool Warwickshire morning. They stand 5 to 8 feet in height and are close to the Rollright Stones in Oxfordshire with which they share folklore. Read More »



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