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St Osyth’s Fountain

Some wells in Britain are associated with the beheading of their patron saint, examples of which include the case of St Winifred, St Fremund, St Juthware and St Osyth. Read More »

St Patrick's Well

Around 450AD St Patrick, patron saint of Ireland is supposed to have preached on the banks of Ullswater in Cumbria. The whole Patterdale area is named after him. In Glenridding a Holy Well dedicated to St Patrick can still be found roughly one mile outside of the village of Glenridding. Read More »

St Patrick’s Chair and Well

St Patrick’s Chair and Well (also known as the Druids Chair and Well or St Brigid’s Well or St Brigit’s Well) lies within Altadeven Wood, not far from the Ulster Way footpath. The chair is a huge 2m high stone block, shaped like a throne. Read More »

St Patrick’s Purgatory, Saint's Island

Lough Derg

According to tradition, whilst St Patrick was converting the Irish pagans to Christianity in the 5th century, he had a vision whilst in a cave on Saints Island, just off the shore of Lough Derg. Read More »

St Peters, Llanbedr

Llanbedr Stone

St Peters Church in Llanbedr is where you can find, behind the rear pew, an ancient engraved stone that stands two foot nine inches in height and two foot wide. The engraving is that of a seven turn spiral measuring twelve inches in diameter. It is said to be similar to those associated with the Irish Boyne culture. Read More »

St Sidwell's (Sativola's or Sadfyl's) Well

According to 'The Legendary Lore Of The Holy Wells Of England' by Robert Charles Hope (1893). 'On the spot where St. Sidwella is reputed to have been martyred is the well dedicated in her honour; it is situated on the left-hand of the Exeter side of the tunnel leaving the city, at a place called Lion's Holt. Read More »

St Simon's Well

According to Edmund Bogg in “From Eden Vale to the plains of York or A Thousand Miles in the Valleys of the Nidd and Yore" (1894) ”In the township of East Scrafton is a spring of water known as St. Simon's Well. Near it once stood an oratory called St. Simon's Chapel; not a vestige of this remains. The well was formerly used as a bath. Tradition says that St. Read More »

The Buggane of St Trinians

St Trinians 1910

St Trinian's church is the ruined shell of a 14th Century building standing at the foot of Mount Greeba on the Isle of Man. The chapel was the haunt of a Buggane: a fearsome creature of Manx folklore that appears in a number of folktales from the island. Read More »

St Tudno and St Tudno’s Church

Saint Tudno (pronounced Tidno) was allegedly one of the seven sons of King Seithenyn, whose legendary kingdom Cantref y Gwaelod (see The Lost Land of Wales) in Cardigan Bay was submerged by tidal activity. In reparation of his father’s neglect, he studied at St. Read More »

St. Beuno's Well

St Beuno's Well

Saint Bueno was born in Powys, and became a missionary who had the protection of the King of Gwynedd, Cadfan. Bueno was awarded the village of Clynnog Fawr where he founded a church in 630.AD. Later the site became a monastery of great importance in Wales, since manuscripts have been found to say that the Abbot of Clynnog was entitled to a seat at the court of the King of Gwynedd. Read More »

St. Illtyd's Well, Llanrhidian

St. Illtyd's Well or the Butter Well as it is also known, can be found in a private garden near the Church of St Rhydian and St Illtyd in Llanrhidian.  It acquired the name Butter Well after an event in the 12th century when milk apparently flowed from it for three hours. Read More »

St. Tydecho Stone

In the village of Llanymawddwy, there is an ancient church dedicated to St. Tydecho, thought to be the son of Anna Pendragon, King Arthur’s sister. Wirt Sykes in British Goblins (1881) gives the following tale of St. Tydecho and a blue stone. ‘There was a stone in the valley of Mowddwy, which did good service for the church. A certain St. Read More »

Stoneleigh Abbey

The Grade I listed Stoneleigh Abbey is country mansion dating from the 16th century, built in the grounds of a Cistercian Abbey which had been founded in 1154 and destroyed after the Dissolution of the Monasteries by King Henry VIII. ‘A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 2’ (1908) gives the following historical background of the Abbey. Read More »

Strata Florida Abbey

The abbey was founded in early part of the 13th century by the Cistercian monks, and was one of the grandest in Wales at its height. It was seen as a centre of education and political activity. The abbey was destroyed during the reformation. Read More »

The Chalice Well, Glastonbury

Chalice Well

The Chalice Well has been associated with healing and with the Holy Grail for many years. According to legend Joseph of Arimethea placed the cup that held the blood of Christ into the well. The waters run red with Iron Oxide another association with blood. Read More »

The Parish Church of All Saints North Street, York

All Saints North Street

All Saints is considered to be York's finest medieval church and has one of the best stained glass displays in Britain. Read More »

Thetford Priory

Founded by Roger Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk (died 1107), the 12th century ruined Priory of St Mary at Thetford has been the site of several reported sightings of what may have been black robed cluniac monks. Read More »

Westminster Abbey

Since 1066AD, Westminster Abbey has been the traditional coronation and burial site for British monarchs, but there are no members of the Royal family among the ghosts that reputedly haunt here. Read More »

Whitby Abbey

Whitby Abbey 2

Whitby Abbey is one of the most atmospheric locations in England. The desolate ruins stand stark above steep cliffs overlooking the old whaling village of Whitby in North Yorkshire, a testament to the town's former religious significance. Read More »

Ynys Seiriol (a.k.a. Puffin Island, Ynys Glannauc, Priestholm and Ynys Lannog)

This island lying off Penmon Point (Trwyn Du) of Anglesey (Ynys Môn) was once known as Priestholm by the Vikings and Ynys Lannog by the Welsh. A charter from 1238AD refers to the canons of the Isle of Glannauch, another name for the island. Read More »

Ysgyryd Fawr

The Ysgyryd Fawr is a hill 486 metres in height, found ten miles from the English border. It is the most easterly of the Black Mountains, and is situated in the Brecon Beacons National Park. The name Ysgyryd Fawr pertains to the shape of the hill, indicating that it has been ‘shattered’ and it has often been anglicised from the Welsh to ‘The Skirrid’ in English. Read More »



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