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Fynnon Powell (Powell’s Well)

This spring on the Great Orme is a water source that doesn’t seem to dry up, even in the driest weather. There is a story associated with the well, which tells of its mysterious formation. Many years ago, the Powell family lived in a dwelling close to where the well is now situated. Read More »

Giant’s Cave, Edenhall

At Giant's Cave, near Eden Hall, it has been the custom from time immemorial for the lads and lasses of the neighbouring villages to collect together on the third Sunday in May, to drink sugar and water, when the lasses give the treat: this is called Sugar-and-Water Sunday. They afterwards adjourn to the public house, and the lads return the compliment in cakes, ale, punch, etc. Read More »

Giggleswick

The ebbing and flowing well: legend tells how a nymph was being chased by a satyr who was overcome with lust. The nymph prayed to the gods and was saved by being turned into a well - famous for healing. The only thing that remained of the nymph was her eternal breath that causes the well to ebb and flow like the tides. Read More »

Glastonbury

Glastonbury Tor Landscape

Glastonbury has been identified with the mysterious Isle of Avalon from the twelfth century, its past has become steeped in myth and legend, and it is probably most famous for its Arthurian and early Christian traditions. Read More »

Healing Wells at Healing

The village of Healing near Grimsby has two notable healing wells, though they are probably not the source of the villages name. In the Domesday Book, Healing is shown as being Hegelinge, an Anglo Saxon term, possibly similar to Hægelingas meaning ‘the sons or followers Hægel’. Read More »

Holwell Holy Well

"HERE was a holy well or spring in the village of Holwell, on the borders of Bedford and Hertfordshire; unfortunately both history and site have been forgotten by the villagers at Holywell.”—A. C. G. Cameron, H.M. Geological Survey. [The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893)]

Holwell Mouth Holy Well

The well at Holwell Mouth is the source of the River Smite and described as being a chalybeate spring. It is said that the well was visited for its medicinal waters and there used to be a stone table and seats for the visitors to use. In 1403 the vicarage was granted land called Well Dole and there are records of a Dole building receiving 10 shillings a year in 1790 for its upkeep.

Holy Island

The island was said to be the home of St Molaise who is reputed to have been born in Ireland in 570AD. He came to Holy Island to live as a hermit and Molaise's cave is one of his reputed abodes. Read More »

Holy Well of St Winifred

St Winifride's Holy Well

The healing waters of St Winifred’s (Winifride) Holy Well have attracted pilgrims for over 1300 years and the crypt in which the well lies was stacked with crutches left by the cured invalids until some time in the 1960’s, though can still be seen on display. Read More »

King Arthur's Well

King Arthur’s Well is so called, because of the myth connected with it, that the waters derive from King Arthur’s kitchen, and the fat from the meat that was cooked there, floats to the surface at the well. In 1853 a physician from Caernarfon named A. Read More »

Lady Well, Thirsk

“An old historian of the town says: "In the marsh near the church flows a spring of pure and excellent water, commonly called Lady Well, doubtless a name of no modern description." Yorks. Folk-lore, p. 199. . [The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893)] Read More »

Lancashire Folk by Melanie Warren

Lancashire Folk by Melanie Warren

I've known Mel for over 20 years, meeting though ASSAP while investigating paranormal cases in the North of England. We share a passion for collecting stories and coming from Lancashire myself I have been looking forward to reading Mel's new book and revisiting some of the old stories, coming across some new ones..and of course, I can now add the book to my collection! Read More »

Leper’s Well, Lyme Regis

Leper's Well Plaque

Situated on hill leading down into the town of Lyme Regis, the Leper’s Well stands on the site of the Chapel of St. Mary and the Holy Spirit. There is a worn inscription above the well telling that a hospital stood on the spot 700 years ago, presumably connected with the alleged curative properties of the well. Read More »

Llangelynin Church and The Holy Well of St. Celynin

Llangelynin church is one of the oldest and remotest churches in Wales; it dates from the 12th Century. Saint Celynin might have erected a religious edifice on the site in the 6th Century since St. Celynin’s well is in the corner of the church yard. The well is a small rectangular pool with stone seats and stone walls. It was reputedly famous for its ability to cure sick children. Read More »

Llddwyn Island

This island is connected by a sandy beach to Anglesey, and was home in the Dark Ages to a religious community, founded by the female Saint Dwynwen. St Dwynwen is a patron saint of Welsh lovers, and after her death the island became an important place of pilgrimage. Read More »

Loch Awe

Loch Awe is Scotlands third largest fresh water loch at with a length of 35km and total surface area of 14.9 miles. It shares a common legend about its creation which concerns a well that flooded. Read More »

Madron Holy Well

One of the most widely known wells in Cornwall, Madron Holy Well is still used, and has been the scene of some miraculous cures in the past. About 100 metres away are the remains of the Madron Well Chapel.

Rags and other objects are left to rot away in the hope of cures, and as votive offerings.

Directions: Northwest of Madron from a footpath Read More »

Maiden Well, North Kelsey

Maiden Well Lane in North Kelsey was probably named after the Maiden Well which was visited on St Mark’s Eve (April 24th) by unmarried women in order to discover, through divination who they will marry. Read More »

Mother Ludlam's Cave

Mother Ludham’s Cave, was so named after the White Witch that was said to live in it. This small sandstone cave can be found in the Wey Valley and is also associated with the ruined Cistercian Waverley Abbey, or more correctly the spring inside it is associated with the monks that lived there. This spring was known as Ludwell and later St Mary's Well. Read More »

Mullinakill Holy Well

Mullenakill is just one of several places that claim to be the birth place of St Moling. Read More »

Nether Stowey

Nether Stowey has a number of holy wells, and the crossroads at Over Stowey is traditionally haunted by a creature known as the Galley Beggar, who laughs demonically at passers by. A Galley Begger is the local name for a frightening spirit.

New Books Published on Fairies and Boggles in Cumbria

A SERIES of hand-crafted booklets on the folklore and legends of Cumbria has been published. Read More »

Nine Maidens Well, Strathmartine

As with the dragon that was associated with it, very little remains of the Nine Maidens Well at Strathmartine, as the farmer upon whose land it could be found had the well covered up to stop it’s visitors from trampling his crops. Read More »

Old Brine, Nantwich

On Ascension Day, the old inhabitants of Nantwich piously sang a hymn of thanksgiving for the blessing of the Brine. Read More »

Penmon and Saint Seiriol

Penmon is a parish found on the south-east tip of Ynys Môn (the Isle of Anglesey). Things to see here include Penmon Priory, Saint Seiriol’s Church, Saint Seiriol’s Well, a dovecote and the Penmon crosses. Read More »

The Dolphin Hotel, Littlehampton

Ellie and Katie along with their staff have created a warm and friendly pub with a traditional feel and traditional values. They have worked hard to turn the Dolphin into one of the safest, cleanest and most welcoming pubs around. Between them they have nearly 30 years experience in the pub and catering trade. Read More »



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