Category: Cryptozoology

A38 Big Cat (2001)

On Wednesday, 22 August, 2001 the BBC News website published the following article entitled ‘Lioness’ spotted by motorists’

Motorists at a Somerset petrol station raised the alarm when they spotted a "big cat" in an adjoining field.

Kirroughtee Hotel Big Cat Sighting (2013)

Holidaymakers staying at Kirroughtee Hotel outside Newton Stewart had a close encounter with one of Galloway’s best kept secrets last Saturday morning – an elusive big cat.

Les Gill and his partner Linda were looking out of their bedroom window when they both clearly saw the animal in the hotel grounds.

Uckfield Black Cat (2013)

The Sussex Express published the following article entitled ‘Big Cat sighted at Uckfield’ on 31 May 2013. ‘A group of members of staff from Uckfield Community Hospital, were working a night shift when they glanced towards the window as something had caught their eye.

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The Giants From The West

According to James Mooney in his ‘Myths Of The Cherokee’ (Nineteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology 1897-98, Part I.) ‘James Wafford*, of the western Cherokee, who was born in Georgia in 1806, says that his grandmother, who must have been born about the middle of the last century, told him that she had beard from the old people that long before her time a party of g

The Hunter In The Däkwä’

In the old days there was a great fish called the Däkwä’, which lived in Tennessee river where Toco creek comes in at Däkwä’, the "Däkwä’ place," above the mouth of Tellico, and which was so large that it could easily swallow a man.

The Ustû’tlï

There was once a great serpent called the Ustû’tlï that made its haunt upon Cohutta mountain. It was called the Ustû’tlï or "foot" snake, because it did not glide like other snakes, but had feet at each end of its body, and moved by strides or jerks, like a great measuring worm.

The Great Leech Of Tlanusi’yï

The following legend is taken from ‘Myths Of The Cherokee’ by James Mooney (Nineteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology 1897-98, Part I.) ’The spot where Valley river joins Hiwassee, at Murphy, in North Carolina, is known among the Cherokees as Tlanusi’yï, "The Leech place," and this is the story they tell of it: