Category: Legends

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Wallace’s Heel Well, Ayr

Wallace’s Heel is a natural spring on the banks of the river Ayr associated with the legendary exploits of William Wallace. Many of the stories surrounding William Wallace originate from a poet/minstrel known as...

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Redesmere, Siddington

A floating island with an attached legend could once be found at Redesmere in the grounds of Capesthorne Hall. The following description by Robert Charles Hope is published in The Legendary Lore of the...

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Why The Wren Flies Close To The Earth

ONE day when the birds were all together, one of them said, “I have been watching men, and I saw that they had a king. Let us too have a king.” “Why?” asked the...

Giant’s Cave, Edenhall

At Giant’s Cave, near Eden Hall, it has been the custom from time immemorial for the lads and lasses of the neighbouring villages to collect together on the third Sunday in May, to drink sugar and water, when the lasses give the treat: this is called Sugar-and-Water Sunday. They afterwards adjourn to the public house, and the lads return the compliment in cakes, ale, punch, etc.

Wimbell Pond

Tradition says an iron chest of money is concealed: if any daring person ventures to approach the pond, and throw a stone into the water, it will ring against the chest ; and a small white figure has been heard to cry in accents of distress, ‘That’s mine’. [W Sparrow Simpson from Notes and Queries 1889 & County Folk-Lore: Suffolk (1893) Lady Camilla Gurdon]

Maiden’s Castle, Reeth

The following treasure legend was published in Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson (1879). ‘I learn from Mr. Robinson, of Hill House, Reeth, Yorkshire, that in his neighbourhood as in many others is a place called Maiden’s Castle, in which tradition avers a chest of gold is buried.

Kirkstall Abbey

The following tunnel legend was published in Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson (1879). ’A…..tale is told of Kirkstall Abbey, near Leeds.

Dallinghoo Treasure

In ‘County Folk-Lore: Suffolk’ (1893), Lady Camilla Gurdon gives the following story ‘Beneath a post of a high gate in Dallinghoo lies a hidden treasure; the ghost of its former owner haunts the spot and twelve clergymen have unitedly failed to lay the spirit.’

Llanilar Church

The following account from ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939) by Elliott O’Donnell (27 February 1872 – 8 May 1965) refers to a Devil tradition associated with three churches in close proximity, though he does not name the individual church.

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Lancashire Folk by Melanie Warren

I’ve known Mel for over 20 years, meeting though ASSAP while investigating paranormal cases in the North of England. We share a passion for collecting stories and coming from Lancashire myself I have been looking forward to reading Mel’s new book and revisiting some of the old stories, coming across some new ones..and of course, I can now add the book to my collection!