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Bell’s Wynd

According to tradition, a house on Bell’s Wynd had supposedly stood empty for twenty one years and no-one was aware that the body of Mrs Guthrie, who had died two decades earlier, was still inside. A locksmith who lived either close by or immediately above the Mrs Guthrie’s decided to break in and see why it was empty. Read More »

Caroline Park House

Caroline Park House dates from 1685. It was commissioned for Sir George Mackenzie, 1st Lord Tarbat (1630 - 1714) and has a reputation for being haunted. In 1683, George Mackenzie had bought the Royston Barony and had originally named this building Royston House. Read More »

Cursed Bone of Learmonth Gardens

Zeyla Hay Seton in Egypt

The home of Sir Alexander Hay Seton, 10th Baronet Seton (born 14 August 1904 – died 1963) became the focus of the world media after poltergeist like activity possibly linked to a bone taken from an Egyptian skeleton led to speculation that the Baronet’s family were cursed by a mummy. Read More »

The Fairy Boy of Leith

The story of the Fairy boy of Leith is relatively unknown today, and doesn't appear to have been recently recounted since its last appearance in the 1970s Reader's Digest compendium, Folklore, Myths a Read More »

Lady Eleanor Primrose And The Conjurer Of Canongate

According to John Ingram, Sir Walter Scott's (Born 15 August 1771 – Died 21 September 1832) story 'My Aunt Margaret's Mirror' was based upon events surrounding Eleanor Countess of Stair. In his book 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain' (1897), Ingram gives the following full account which he compiled using the work of Robert Chambers and other Scottish writers. Read More »

Learmonth Hotel, Edinburgh

The Learmonth Hotel is reputedly haunted by what has been described as a poltergeist . The hotel is on the tree lined 19th Century Learmonth Terrace. Activity in the hotel is said to include doors that open and close by themselves, whistling being heard by staff and visitors in the corridors and interference with electrical devices such as hairdryers and kettles. Read More »

Major Thomas Weir’s House

According to an article by Oliver Norton in the Daily Mail on 7 February 2014, part of the home of the occultist Thomas Weir still survives. Read More »

Mary King's Close

A close such as Mary King's Close is a narrow lane or passage that runs between two buildings or a route that would give access to the rear of a building. Read More »

Prophetic Dream, Edinburgh Castle, 1734

According to 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain by John Ingram (1897); A singular prophetic, or warning dream, is related and vouched for as "entirely authentic," by Dr. Abercrombie, in his work on Inquiries Concerning the Intellectual Powers. The Doctor, however, only gives the skeleton of the story and omits the names of the persons concerned. Read More »

St Anthony's Well, Edinburgh

Prior to 1674 St Anthony’s Well flowed from beneath a small stone arch in a slightly higher position to the bolder from under which it now sprouts. It was probably connected to the nearby 15th century St Anthony’s Chapel which is now a ruin. Read More »

St Margaret's Well, Edinburgh

St Margaret's Well, Edinburgh

During the 1860 St Margaret's Well was moved to its present location from the crossroads between Holyrood and Restalrig. It was described in 1852 as 'a spring well, enclosed by an ancient vault over which part of the railway workshops had been built.' Read More »

The Ghost of John Chiesly

For three hundred years Dalry was reputedly haunted by the apparition of a screaming (and sometimes manically laughing) man with a bloody stump for his right arm. This ghost was known as ‘Johnny One-Arm’ or, more correctly John Chiesly. John was an unhappy husband who petitioned for a divorce in 1688. Read More »

Trinity Poltergeist

Trinity is a mansion house district in Edinburgh that developed in the early 1800’s and was named after Trinity House in Leith. There was a suspected case of poltergeist activity in a house in Trinity around 1835 which led to a legal battle between the supposedly haunted Captain Molesworth and his neighbour and landlord, Mr Webster. Read More »

Unknown Mansion and Queensberry House, Canongate

In 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain' (1897), John Ingram gives the following account of a haunting associated with Canongate in Edinburgh. Named after the Augustine canons of Holyrood Abbey, Canongate can be found at the lower eastern part of the Royal Mile in Edinburgh and the mansion referred to is according Ingram no longer standing. Read More »

Wrichtishousis, Edinburgh

Gillespie's Hospital

In 1798 the Wrichtishousis (Wrychtishousis or Wrightshouses) mansion was bought and subsequently demolished in 1800 to make way for a hospital and school, the legacy of the merchant James Gillespie (born 1726 – died 1797). Read More »



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