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A64 between York and Norton

Traditionally haunted by the spirit of Nance, who is said to guide travellers when there are dense mists. The story goes that she was due to marry a mail-coach driver but fell for the charms of a highwayman. He turned out to be a bad choice, as he left her and their baby to die of exposure on the lonely road. Read More »

A640 Buckstones Ghost

The following article by Phil Clay entitled ‘The Buckstones Ghost’ appeared in the Saddleworth White Rose Society (in the county of York) Newsletter (2000) and details his experience with an apparition whilst serving as a Police Officer in Saddleworth whilst it was part of West Yorkshire. Read More »

Abbot William Sadyngton, Onychomancer

William Sadyngton was made Abbot of Leister Abbey on 26th October 1420 and he died in 1442. The Abbot is probably best known for using the occult power of Onychomancy to catch the thief of a silver plate and some coinage. Read More »

The Abbots Bromley Horn Dance

1st Monday after 4 September - One of the oldest folk festivals in Britain. The dance involves six horn dancers equipped with reindeer horns painted white and brown, a Maid Marion, a boy armed with a bow and a hobby horse. The dancers make a 20-mile tour of the parish. The actual dance follows a snake like pattern, as the dancers intertwine with each other.

Abbotsbury Garland Day

13 May - Is Abbotsbury Garland Day a celebration of the old May Day from the Julian calendar. Flowers are woven into frames and carried about the town by children.

Abingdon Old Gaol

The Grade II listed Old Gaol in Abingdon dates from 1811 and was the first British jail with wings. It closed as a jail in 1868. Between 1974 and 2002 the building as used a leisure centre and it was during this time that it gained a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

Acaster Malbis

During the medieval period in Britain the Jewish people were heavily persecuted, one of the heavy persecutions was carried out in York. A group of Jewish people fled to Acaster Mathis, and used the parish church for meeting. Some local villagers managed to trap the group inside and then set fire to the building - killing all those who were trapped inside. Read More »

The Acton Arms, Morville

The ghost that haunts this 18th century establishment appeared every day and sometimes more than once each day according Mrs Mary Walker, the landlady during the early 1970s. It was described as "like seeing a sheet flick from one door to the other". In 1973 Marc Alexander nominated The Acton Arms as England's most frequently haunted inn. Read More »

Admiral Tryon's Ghost

Admiral Tryon

Following an eight year search, on 22nd August 2004, Christian Francis of Lebanon Divers found the wreck of HMS Victoria near Tripoli. Standing vertically with her bow and the first 30m of her length buried in the seabed, she was the victim of naval blunder and her sinking in 1893 is directly linked to reports of an apparition being witnessed. Read More »

Aiggin Stone (Aigin Stone), Blackstone Edge

Roughly 600 years old, the Aiggin Stone is thought to be a medieval marker on the boundary between Yorkshire and Lancashire on what may have been a Roman road. Now standing about 4 foot in height, it was said to have originally measured 7 foot. There a few carvings in the stone, a cross and the letters I and T.

Aintree Racecourse

Aintree is the home of the famous four mile long Grand National handicap horse race which was first run 170 years ago on 26 February 1839 (won by a horse named ‘Lottery’), it is also possibly haunted. Read More »

Aira Force

Aira Force on the A592, 3 miles from Glenridding, is probably one of the best know waterfalls in the Lake District, especially after appearing in three of William Wordworths poems. The name derives from the Norse word for waterfall, ‘fors’, and Aira Force is where the Aira Beck plummets 66 foot down toward Ullswater. Read More »

Albemarle Street

Albermarle Street is built on the site of Clarendon House, home of Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon (Born 18 February 1609 – Died 9 December 1674). The Paranormal Database refers to a 1960s ghost called George Payne was seen on Albermarle Street. Read More »

Alcock's Arbour (aka Devil's Bag of Nuts)

There are two stories associated with this conical hill just off the road between Stratford and Alcester known as the Devil's Bag of Nuts and Alcock's Arbour. One 21 September which is the known as the Devil's Nutting Day, Satan was collecting nuts when he was surprised by the Virgin Mary. Read More »

Alderley Edge

Alderley Edge Carving

Alderley Edge has been a sacred site for many thousands of years and has many legends attached to it. King Arthur and his men are said to sleep somewhere beneath the sandstone cliffs. Read More »

Alderman Hill and Alphin Pike

In legend the rolling boulder-strewn hills of Alphin Pike and Alderman Hill were the abodes of the giants Alphin and Alderman, after whom the peaks were named. Alphin and Alderman were at first on friendly terms, until they both became enamoured with a beautiful water nymph called Rimmon, who lived in the valley below them in the bubbling waters of Chew Brook. Read More »

Aldershot, Basingstoke Canal UFO Abduction (1983)

Albert Burtoo stands as the oldest UFO abductee, if his story is to be taken at face value. He was aged 77 at the time of the incident, and had just settled for a nights fishing session on the side of Basingstoke Canal on 12th August 1983. At about 1.00pm he noticed a bright light, which he took to be an army Helicopter from the nearby Para base. Read More »

Aldgate Underground Railway Station

Aldgate Railway Station which serves the Circle Line and Metropolitan Line opened on 18 November 1876 and is said to have been built on a Plague Pit where hundreds of victims of the Bubonic Plague of 1665 were buried. Daniel Dafoe mentions this ‘terrible pit’ in the churchyard of the Parish of Aldgate in his ‘A Journal of the Plague Year’ published 1722*. Read More »

The Aldworth Giants

Sir Philip

The tiny atmospheric parish church at Aldworth, contains numerous huge effigies of the De La Beche family. The figures are supposed to be life size representations, depicting knights all over seven feet tall. The De La Beche family were powerful landowners and knights in the 14th century. Read More »

Alfred Street, Redcar

At 2.00 am, one morning in 1963, Mrs Pamela Iredale, her brother Barry Gardner and her nine-month baby fled their terraced house in Alfred Street, Redcar.

Mrs Iredale said, quote: "I just couldn't stand it any longer.. I didn't believe in ghosts, but I wouldn't spend another night in that house for a fortune. Read More »

Alice Hackney and St.Mary-at-Hill

St Mary at Hill

St Mary-at-Hill is a Grade I listed building on Lovat Lane. The founding of the church dates from 12th century though it has been rebuilt and renovated many times since then. It was during one period of renovation that it became linked with Alice Hackney who’s body was found preserved after being buried for nearly two hundred years. Alice also reputedly haunts the church still. Read More »

All Saints Church & The Holbeach Gamblers

There were once four men of Holbeach, by the names of Slator, Watson, Barker and Codling who would, in the closing years of the 18th century, would regularly meet at the Chequers Inn in the town. Their heavy drinking was always accompanied by rowdy gambling over the card table, until, one day in 1793, the death of Mr. Codling put and end to their sport. Read More »

All Saints Church, Alton Priors

The Grade II listed All Saints Church in Alton Priors dates from the 12th century. According to 'A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 11' (1980) 'The church of ALL SAINTS, Alton Priors, is built of freestone, rubble, and red brick and has a chancel, nave, and west tower. The chancel arch survives from the 12th-century church. Read More »

All Saints Church, Nunnington and the Dragon of Loschy Wood

The following account of the legend of the Dragon of Loschy Hill was detailed in the 1888 book ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ by Rev Thomas Parkinson who quoted his source as being an article entitled Serpent Legends of Yorkshire from the Leisure Hour (May 1878). Read More »

All Saints Vicarage, Bristol

In 1846 the Bristol Times published the following story entitled ‘A Ghost at Bristol’ which concentrated on the vicarage of the Grade II listed All Saints Church, parts of which date back to the 12th Century. Read More »



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