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St Augustines Well, Cerne Abbas

St Augustines Well, Cerne Abbas

All the following details were made available on the information board inside the burial ground situated above St Augustine's Well; Read More »

St Batholomew the Great Parish Church

Rahere

Founded in 1123 by Rahere, a jester/minstrel in the court of King Henry I (1068 – 1 December 1135), making this one of the oldest churches in London. Originally established as an Augustinian Priory Church, its nave was demolished in 1539 when King Henry VIII ordered the Dissolution of the Monastery’s. Read More »

St Bees Priory

St Bees Priory Graveslab

The atmospheric church at St Bees is all that remains of a small Benedictine monastery closed down during the reformation. The priory is associated with the legend of St Bega, who is said to have fled here to escape an arranged marriage in Ireland. Read More »

St Botolph's Church without Bishopgate

St Botolph Picture

In 1982 Chris Brackley took a famous photograph whilst he was in St Botolph’s Church. The photograph was of the interior of the church, taking in the aisle, altar and main stain glass window. In the upper right hand side of picture there appears to be ghostly image of a figure dressed in period costume in the Choir Loft. Read More »

St Chad's Church, Saddleworth

St Chad's Church

Saddleworth church - dedicated to St Chad - has a legend associated with its location. It is said that the original site for the church was on nearby Brown Hill, but every night the stones were mysteriously moved to their present position. Eventually the builders gave up moving the stones back to Brown Hill, and built it where the stones were placed each night. Read More »

St Cuthbert's Churchyard, Carlisle

St Cuthberts

The graveyard of this old church was the scene of grave robbing, along with other sites in Carlisle during the 1820s.

St Ethelbert’s Holy Well

Around 794AD, King Offa of Mercia demanded the head of the Christian King Ethelbert of East Anglia whilst he was making arrangements to marry Offa's daughter. Not far from the location of Marden Church the young king was assassinated and his body hidden. After rumours of Ethelbert's ghost being seen in the marden area, Offa asked the Pope for absolution. Read More »

St George's Day

St George

Today St George’s Day is not celebrated in England with anywhere near the vigour it was in past centuries, and is actually celebrated more in other countries that share his patronage, with traditions that have not been broken for hundreds of years. Read More »

St George's Church, Gravesend

The original St George’s Church dates from 1497. Read More »

St Ives Bay

A ghost ship seen off the coast, has been identified with the ship Neptune. Also a ghostly lantern light is said to haunt the shore. It is supposed to be the lantern of a woman who was shipwrecked here and lost her baby to the waves. She is constantly searching for her child. Read More »

St James's Church Garlickhythe

St James's Church Garlickhythe

St James's Church Garlickhythe is an ancient church that was destroyed during the Great Fire of London of September 1666 and rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren (opening on 10 December 1682, though the tower was not finished until 1717). Read More »

St James's Palace

John Ingram recounts the following experience with an apparition at St James's Palace, in his 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain (1897)'. Read More »

St James’s Park

St James's Park 1833

Dating from 1536, measuring 58 acres, St James’s Park, named after a thirteenth century leper hospital which was dedicated to St James the Less, is the oldest of the Royal Park’s in London and is reputedly haunted by a murdered headless woman in red. Read More »

St Keyne

St Keyne

The holy well in the village is connected with a 5th century virgin called St Keyne who performed miracles.

St Lawrence's Churchyard, Ludlow

St Lawrences

This Norman church who's foundations date from 1100AD is supposedly haunted by an old woman, wearing a long robe and having grey hair. She moves through the churchyard between the graves and also near the rectory.  It has been suggested that she may be more popular on summer evenings. Read More »

St Leonards, Walton-le-Dale

Edward Kelly

St Leonard’s Church in Walton-le-Dale was according to folklore the location that Edward Kelly and Dr John Dee chose to famously summon a spirit, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. Read More »

St Levan's Church

It is said that the sound of a bell issues from a particular grave in the churchyard, when someone who is destined to die soon passes over it.

The church yard also contains a stone said to have been split open by St Levan. According to tradition if the gap becomes wide enough for a horse and cart to pass through it, it will signal the end of the world. Read More »

St Lewina

St Lewina was a young British virgin who was martyred by Saxons on 24 July 687AD (whilst Theodore was 7th Archbishop of Canterbury). Following her death she was buried at Seaford, near Lewes in East Sussex. Read More »

St Magnus the Martyr Church

St Magnus the Martyr

St Magnus the Martyr was the second church to be damaged during the Great Fire of London in 1666 and was subsequently rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren (born 20 October 1632 – died 25 February 1723) at a cost of £9,580. Read More »

St Margaret's Church, Hornby

The Grade I listed St Margaret's Church in Hornby was founded by Sir Edward Stanley, Lord Mounteagle, in 1514, the tower of which still stands. (An earlier church had been on the site dating from around 1338). Read More »

St Mary's Bleeding Gravestone

St Mary’s Church is the last resting place of Richard Smith who was killed on 12th April 1727, aged 20 years old. A recruiting sergeant for the army had come to Hinckley and was informing a crowd of potential new soldiers about the virtues of taking the King’s shilling, when Richard started barracking him, making jokes and quips. Read More »

St Mary's Church, Ambrosden

The church has a siting legend attached to it, every morning when the stone masons returned to the field in which the church was being built, they would find the stones to have mysteriously moved to another site. Eventually after happening on a number of occasions the workmen gave up and built the church where the stones reappeared. The Devil was blamed as the prime suspect. Read More »

St Mary's Church, Ashwell

A headless ghost dressed in black is supposed to haunt the churchyard.

Directions:
Reached via a minor road off the A505 at Slip End.

St Mary's Naval Barracks, Chatham

St Mary's Barracks

The fortification of Chatham started in 1756 and was further improved between 1805 and 1812 in the face of French aggression and the Napoleonic War. Demolished in the 1960's, St. Mary’s Barracks dated from between 1779 and 1782 and was built to house the prisoners who were used to build fort. This of course included French prisoners. Read More »

St Mary’s Church, Barnetby-le-Wold

The church of St Mary’s on Church Hill in Barnetby-le-Wold dates from Saxon times though the current building is rebuilt during the Norman era. The church was actually declared redundant and closed in 1972 soo you cannot visit it without making special arrangements. One special item of note regarding St Mary’s was its lead font which dated from the early 12th century. Read More »



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