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The Spital Inn And The Hand of Glory

A Hand of Glory was used by a gang of thieves in an attempt to rob the long gone Spital Inn, North Stainmore in 1797. Read More »

Spofforth Castle

A holding of William de Percy, one of the early supporters of William the Conquer, who was given vast tracts of land in Yorkshire for his brave service. Read More »

The Spriggans

Armed Spriggan

Spriggans is the name given to a family of fairies in Cornish folklore, they are the closely related to the Piskies, but were generally believed to be darker and more dangerous than their mischievous cousins. Whereas Piskies are generally described as being cheerful and fun loving, Spriggans are more spiteful and full of malice, directed at humans in the form of evil tricks. Read More »

Spring Cottage, Bloxwich

The present day Spring Cottage dates back to the turn of the 20th century and was built on the site of a former pub. The former pub on the site was reputedly used as a temporary gaol for prisoners in Victorian times. They would be incarcerated in the cellar where there was no chance of escape. Read More »

Spring Heeled Jack – The Terror of the Black Country

Out of the dark, supernatural depths of Victorian England one name stands out. Jack.

Not Jack the Ripper, but a more supernatural fiend - Spring Heeled Jack! Read More »

Spring Heeled Jack? Ewell 2012

The following story by Lauren May entitled 'Paranormal experts weigh in on dark figure mystery' appeared in the Epsom Guardian 8 March 2012 and concerns a strange experience reported by multiple witnesses that took place on Valentines Day. Read More »

SS Great Britain

Ships Rear

The SS Great Britain ranks amongst the most famous ships every built. Over 160 years old she now rests in same the dry dock that was specially created for her construction in Bristol harbour. The dock itself is now airtight and environmentally controlled to preserve the mighty vessel and prevent her wrought iron hull from being eaten by corrosion. Read More »

St Albans Abbey

St Alban's Abbey

St Albans has a multitude of ghosts and strange stories, many of which are attached to the magnificent abbey. St Albans has been occupied from very early in its history, the Roman town of Verulamium once stood in the valley, in the area where the public park now lies. Read More »

St Alkelda's Well, Middleham

St Alkeda was a chaste Saxon maiden, sometimes described as a princess, noble woman or a nun. On 28th March 800AD, somewhere close to the site of St Mary’s and St Alkelda’s Church, she was strangled to death for her faith by two Danish women involved in a Viking raid. It has been suggested that they killed her by twisting a napkin around her neck. Read More »

St Andrew's Churchyard, Rodney Street

Pyramid Tomb

A pyramid monument to the William McKenzie (20 March 1794-29 October 1851) rests in the churchyard of the (currently disused and needing restoration) Scottish Presbyterian Church of St Andrew's, dating from 1824. McKenzie made his fortune as a civil engineer in the Victorian era but it is the nature of his burial, or lack of it that has become legendary. Read More »

St Andrews Church, Cobham

St Andrews in Cobham dates back to the 12th century, though it has been through extensive renovation during its 800 year history. The church is supposed to be haunted by a strange apparition, that of a blue donkey.

St Andrew’s Church, Banwell

The following article entitled ‘The Glory of Banwell Church’, edited by Jill Bailey, was originally published on 28 September 1963 and republished in the The Weston Mercury on 23 May 2008. Read More »

St Anne's Castle, Great Leighs

St Anne's Castle appeared in the Domesday Book (1086) and is one of the oldest pubs in the United Kingdom, if not the oldest. It is reputed to have a haunted room and poltergeist activity has been experienced in the past. Read More »

St Augustines Well, Cerne Abbas

St Augustines Well, Cerne Abbas

All the following details were made available on the information board inside the burial ground situated above St Augustine's Well; Read More »

St Bartholomew's Church, Fingest

St Bartholomews Church is a Grade I listed building and dates back to the 12th century. There is a folk good luck custom associated with weddings at St Batholomews, where the groom is expected to lift his bride over the church gate after the ceremony. To ensure this is done the church gate is usually kept locked on such occasions. Read More »

St Batholomew the Great Parish Church

Rahere

Founded in 1123 by Rahere, a jester/minstrel in the court of King Henry I (1068 – 1 December 1135), making this one of the oldest churches in London. Originally established as an Augustinian Priory Church, its nave was demolished in 1539 when King Henry VIII ordered the Dissolution of the Monastery’s. Read More »

St Bees Priory

St Bees Priory Graveslab

The atmospheric church at St Bees is all that remains of a small Benedictine monastery closed down during the reformation. The priory is associated with the legend of St Bega, who is said to have fled here to escape an arranged marriage in Ireland. Read More »

St Botolph's Church without Bishopgate

St Botolph Picture

In 1982 Chris Brackley took a famous photograph whilst he was in St Botolph’s Church. The photograph was of the interior of the church, taking in the aisle, altar and main stain glass window. In the upper right hand side of picture there appears to be ghostly image of a figure dressed in period costume in the Choir Loft. Read More »

St Chad's Church, Saddleworth

St Chad's Church

Saddleworth church - dedicated to St Chad - has a legend associated with its location. It is said that the original site for the church was on nearby Brown Hill, but every night the stones were mysteriously moved to their present position. Eventually the builders gave up moving the stones back to Brown Hill, and built it where the stones were placed each night. Read More »

St Cuthbert's Churchyard, Carlisle

St Cuthberts

The graveyard of this old church was the scene of grave robbing, along with other sites in Carlisle during the 1820s.

St Ethelbert’s Holy Well

Around 794AD, King Offa of Mercia demanded the head of the Christian King Ethelbert of East Anglia whilst he was making arrangements to marry Offa's daughter. Not far from the location of Marden Church the young king was assassinated and his body hidden. After rumours of Ethelbert's ghost being seen in the marden area, Offa asked the Pope for absolution. Read More »

St George's Day

St George

Today St George’s Day is not celebrated in England with anywhere near the vigour it was in past centuries, and is actually celebrated more in other countries that share his patronage, with traditions that have not been broken for hundreds of years. Read More »

St George's Church, Gravesend

The original St George’s Church dates from 1497. Read More »

St Ives Bay

A ghost ship seen off the coast, has been identified with the ship Neptune. Also a ghostly lantern light is said to haunt the shore. It is supposed to be the lantern of a woman who was shipwrecked here and lost her baby to the waves. She is constantly searching for her child. Read More »

St James's Church Garlickhythe

St James's Church Garlickhythe

St James's Church Garlickhythe is an ancient church that was destroyed during the Great Fire of London of September 1666 and rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren (opening on 10 December 1682, though the tower was not finished until 1717). Read More »



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