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St Michael's Mount

St Michaels Mount 1

St Michael's Mount is a picturesque rocky island that has been described as the 'Jewel in Cornwall's crown' - perhaps a reason for its popularity with visitors. Read More »

St Michaels Parish Church, Ashton-under-Lyne

St Michaels Parish Church is thought to have been founded by Sir John Assheton (died 1428), Member of Parliament and soldier. Read More »

St Nectan's Glen

St Nectan's Glen, classical labyrinth

This beautiful glen is home to two rock cut labyrinths of classical (Cretan) design next to a watermill in rocky valley. Each carving is about 12 inches across its face.

There is some conjecture about their origin. They may date from the Bronze Age or Iron Age period, but are more likely to be the work of a local miller in the eighteenth century. Read More »

St Neot Holy Well

The holy well at St Neot was once said to be the home of two holy fishes.

There is a story attached to these fish, it is said that one of the local priests had a vision, in which an angel told him that if he took one fish from the well every day to eat, there would always be a replacement the next day. Read More »

St Nicholas Church, Alcester

Fulke Greville Tomb

Inside the Parish Church of St Nicholas in Alcester (parts of which date back to the 14th century) can be found the tomb of Sir Fulke Greville (Died 10 November 1559) and his wife Elizabeth Willoughby, 3rd Baroness Willoughby de Broke, de jure 11th Baroness Latimer (Born 1512 - Buried 15 November 1562) and it was beside this tomb, according to the Paranormal Database, that the apparition of the af Read More »

St Nicholas's Churchyard, Chiswick

St Nicholas's Church, Chiswick

St Nicholas’s Church on Church Street in Chiswick is reputedly haunted by two of Oliver Cromwell’s daughters and there is even a legend associated with the church suggesting that the Lord Protector himself may have finally found peace there. Read More »

St Oswald's Church, Winwick

St Oswald, King of Northumbria (Born 604 – Died 5 August 642) was killed during the Battle of Maserfield (Maserfelth) against the pagan Mercian King Penda (Died 15 November 655). Read More »

St Oswald’s Holy Well, Winwick

St Oswald’s Well is Grade II listed and can be found a mile north of St Oswald's Church, Winwick in a field beside the A573. Read More »

St Osyth's Dragon

There is a tradition that a Dragon prowled the area around St Osyth in the 12th Century. According to Sir Richard Baker (born 1568 – died 18 February 1645) 'In the seventeenth year of his (King Henry II) reign, there was seen at St. Read More »

St Osyth’s Fountain

Some wells in Britain are associated with the beheading of their patron saint, examples of which include the case of St Winifred, St Fremund, St Juthware and St Osyth. Read More »

St Patrick's Well

Around 450AD St Patrick, patron saint of Ireland is supposed to have preached on the banks of Ullswater in Cumbria. The whole Patterdale area is named after him. In Glenridding a Holy Well dedicated to St Patrick can still be found roughly one mile outside of the village of Glenridding. Read More »

St Peter's Church, Stanion

A two meter long whale bone inside this 13th century church has been linked to a legend of a huge cow that was big enough to feed the whole village in times of need. Read More »

St Sidwell's (Sativola's or Sadfyl's) Well

According to 'The Legendary Lore Of The Holy Wells Of England' by Robert Charles Hope (1893). 'On the spot where St. Sidwella is reputed to have been martyred is the well dedicated in her honour; it is situated on the left-hand of the Exeter side of the tunnel leaving the city, at a place called Lion's Holt. Read More »

St Simon's Well

According to Edmund Bogg in “From Eden Vale to the plains of York or A Thousand Miles in the Valleys of the Nidd and Yore" (1894) ”In the township of East Scrafton is a spring of water known as St. Simon's Well. Near it once stood an oratory called St. Simon's Chapel; not a vestige of this remains. The well was formerly used as a bath. Tradition says that St. Read More »

St Vincent’s Church, Burton

St Vincents dates back probably to the Norman occupation with a church in Burton being recorded in the Domes Day Book of 1086 and the earliest recorded rector being Richard de Basingham in 1186. Read More »

St. Catherine's Hill

St. Catherine's Hill is a prominent chalk hill not far from Winchester in Hampshire's South Downs. The hill appears to have had a significant place in local life since early times, and indeed the remains of an iron age hillfort can still be seen there today, hinting that St. Catherine's Hill was of military, economic and perhaps spiritual importance. Read More »

The Stainton Ghost

The Cumberland News, 30/06/1999 had an article by Ruth Berry and Gill Hands about the Stainton Ghost. According to the story, a church or abbey once stood near the village and human bones were found among the ruins. During the reformation the land upon which this holy building stood fell into the hands of a certain baron, now nameless. Read More »

Stanton Drew Stone Circle

Stanton Drew(1)

The Neolithic ritual site of Stanton Drew consists of three stone circles and a group of stones referred to as 'The Cove'. The largest of the circles known as the Great Circle consists of 27 stones, most of which are recumbent (lying down) having fallen in the past. Read More »

Steeles Lane, Meopham

Anna Dubuis gave the following account of a haunting on Steele Lane in her 31 October 2012 article ‘The ghosts and legends of north Kent’ which appeared in the Gravesend Reporter. Read More »

Stevenson Street, North Shields

The following account first appeared in Catherine Crowe’s The Night Side of Nature, or, Ghosts and Ghost Seers (1848) and was repeated in The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain by John Ingham (1897). The case concerns a residential property being leased by Mrs L in the early 19th century. Read More »

Stiperstones

Striper Tones

As with many tales regarding in Britain about the Devil, this one also has him carrying an apron full of stones, in this case from Ireland. He sat to rest upon what is now called The Devil's Chair and is the highest rock on this ridge. As usual, the apron strings break and he drops his load of stones. Read More »

Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle

This thirteenth century fortified manor house is supposedly the hiding place of a treasure chest full of gold, which was hidden by two giants. The legend says the treasure is guarded by a raven which sits atop the chest. The key to the chest was apparently lost when one of the giants dropped it in the moat. Read More »

The Giants of Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle (1)

This legend belongs to the area around Stokesay Castle in Shropshire, and was first recorded in Shropshire Folklore, A Sheaf of Gleanings by Burne and Jackson London 1883. What follows is a short adaptation of the original folklore. Read More »

Stokesley

The Wise man of a stokesley a man called Wrightson is reputed to have been a great seer and healer. The 7th son of a 7th daughter he was especially famed for healing cattle and his far sight. He died in the 1900s. Many villages had such wise men and women famed for their powers.

Stonehenge

Sunset at Stonehenge

Stonehenge is probably the most recognisable and enigmatic stone circle in Britain. The structure has fascinated people for centuries, and there are many theories as to what purpose it was put to by ancient man. Stonehenge has suffered over the years from trophy hunters, and the wear and tear of many visitors. Read More »



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