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The Stainton Ghost

The Cumberland News, 30/06/1999 had an article by Ruth Berry and Gill Hands about the Stainton Ghost. According to the story, a church or abbey once stood near the village and human bones were found among the ruins. During the reformation the land upon which this holy building stood fell into the hands of a certain baron, now nameless. Read More »

Stanton Drew Stone Circle

Stanton Drew(1)

The Neolithic ritual site of Stanton Drew consists of three stone circles and a group of stones referred to as 'The Cove'. The largest of the circles known as the Great Circle consists of 27 stones, most of which are recumbent (lying down) having fallen in the past. Read More »

Steeles Lane, Meopham

Anna Dubuis gave the following account of a haunting on Steele Lane in her 31 October 2012 article ‘The ghosts and legends of north Kent’ which appeared in the Gravesend Reporter. Read More »

Stevenson Street, North Shields

The following account first appeared in Catherine Crowe’s The Night Side of Nature, or, Ghosts and Ghost Seers (1848) and was repeated in The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain by John Ingham (1897). The case concerns a residential property being leased by Mrs L in the early 19th century. Read More »

Stiperstones

Striper Tones

As with many tales regarding in Britain about the Devil, this one also has him carrying an apron full of stones, in this case from Ireland. He sat to rest upon what is now called The Devil's Chair and is the highest rock on this ridge. As usual, the apron strings break and he drops his load of stones. Read More »

Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle

This thirteenth century fortified manor house is supposedly the hiding place of a treasure chest full of gold, which was hidden by two giants. The legend says the treasure is guarded by a raven which sits atop the chest. The key to the chest was apparently lost when one of the giants dropped it in the moat. Read More »

The Giants of Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle (1)

This legend belongs to the area around Stokesay Castle in Shropshire, and was first recorded in Shropshire Folklore, A Sheaf of Gleanings by Burne and Jackson London 1883. What follows is a short adaptation of the original folklore. Read More »

Stokesley

The Wise man of a stokesley a man called Wrightson is reputed to have been a great seer and healer. The 7th son of a 7th daughter he was especially famed for healing cattle and his far sight. He died in the 1900s. Many villages had such wise men and women famed for their powers.

Stonehenge

Sunset at Stonehenge

Stonehenge is probably the most recognisable and enigmatic stone circle in Britain. The structure has fascinated people for centuries, and there are many theories as to what purpose it was put to by ancient man. Stonehenge has suffered over the years from trophy hunters, and the wear and tear of many visitors. Read More »

Stoneleigh Abbey

The Grade I listed Stoneleigh Abbey is country mansion dating from the 16th century, built in the grounds of a Cistercian Abbey which had been founded in 1154 and destroyed after the Dissolution of the Monasteries by King Henry VIII. ‘A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 2’ (1908) gives the following historical background of the Abbey. Read More »

Stoney Littleton Long Barrow

This early Neolithic Long Barrow was constructed around 3700BC. The forecourt is flanked by two projecting horns, which frame the entrance to the passageway. The actual passageway extends under the mound for 48 feet and has 3 chambers on either side of the passage and 1 end chamber. These were found to contain a mixed group of bones some of them burned, from a number of different burials. Read More »

Stowell Park

The Stowell Park Estate is a private agricultural and sporting estate owned by the Vestey family. The following account of a encounter with an apparition appeared in 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain by John Ingram (1897)'. Though the account does not refer to Stowell Park by name, rather as Chedworth, the 'seat of Lord Chedworth'. Read More »

Strada Restaurant, Bath

The Strada restaurant in Beau Nash House, Saint John's Place, Bath is beside the Theatre Royal and as the building name suggests it was lived in by the dandy Richard Beau Nash (Born 18 October 1674 – Died 3 February 1761). Read More »

Strange Lands By Andrew L Paciorek

Strange Lands

Andy Paciorek is one of Mysterious Britain & Irelands favourite contributors and his amazing artwork can be found illustrating articles throughout this site. Read More »

Strange Mitcham by James Clark

Strange Mitcham

Strange Mitcham by James Clark was first published as a booklet in 2002 as part of ASSAP's (Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) Project Albion. It was updated and republished in 2011 giving James the opportunity to add a few more articles and further information. Read More »

Stratford Tombstone Murder Ghost

I find it very distasteful when ghosts are identified as people who were killed in fairly recent events, especially as this could cause distress for the deceased's friends and family. I am therefore in two minds whether to mention this reputed haunting and I apologise if it upsets anyone. Read More »

Stretford Great Stone

By the entrance of Gorse Hill Park from Chester Road is a large boulder known as the Great Stone. This stone gave its name to Great Stone Road (beside which it stood until 1925) and the old Great Stone Farm. There are many stories, legends and theories concerning the origins of the stone. Read More »

Stroud Large Cat Sightings (2010)

On 23 January 2010 the Stroud News & Journal featured an article by Rachel Clare entitled ‘Does this print prove the existence of big cats in the Five Valleys?’. As the title suggests it was based on a photograph tracks of a suspected Big Cat. Read More »

Sun Inn, Saxilby

The Sun Inn at Saxilby probably dates from around the 18th century and is closely linked with a famous early 19th century murder, that of Mary Kirkham and it said that Tom Otter, the murderer, reputedly haunts the pub to this day. Read More »

Swains Lane

Dating from at least 1492 when it was referred to as Swayneslane, it was one of four old parallel pathways leading up to Highgate village. (The others being West Hill, Bromwich Walk (now disappeared) and Dartmouth Hill). Also known for a long time as Swines Lane, it passed between agricultural land giving access to the farms on either side of it. Read More »

The Swan Hotel, Telford

Haunted by Humphrey, the victim of a mugging in the 1800s. He was seen by the former cook, Mrs Peggy Sayer on the landing. He was described as wearing a thick leathery coat and trousers.

Swarkestone Bridge

Civil War Ghosts

At just under a mile in length, the Swarkestone Bridge over the River Trent was originally built in the 13th century and is the longest stone bridge in England. Being a strategic crossing it has been the focus of military action during both the Civil War and the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745 and it is suggested that perhaps some of the soldiers involved hunt the bridge still. Read More »

Swearing on the Horns

Swearing on the Horns

Between the 17th and 19th centuries there was a folk custom in the Public Houses and Inns of Highgate known as the ‘Swearing on the Horns’. Read More »

Swinside Stone Circle

Swinside Stone Circle

A beautiful solitary stone circle, the stones are said to be uncountable, there is also a legend which suggests a church buried beneath the stones. It is sometimes referred to as the Sunkenkirk for this very reason. The circle is also referred to as the 'grey cobbles'. Read More »

Swinsty Hall

Swinsty Hall dates from the 16th Century and can be found on the banks of Swinsty Reservoir (built 1874). Read More »



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