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The City of London Cemetery

Opened in 1856, the 200 acre, Grade I listed City of London Cemetery is one of the largest municipal cemeteries in Europe and the final resting place for several famous people. During the 1970’s it was reported that a gravestone in the western portion of the cemetery glowed bright orange and no external light source or cause for this effect could be determined upon investigation. Read More »

The Cock and Bottle, York

According to a local paper, George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham who used to live on Skeldergate, York, haunts The Cock and Bottle. The haunting has included the sound of door being broken, the apparition of an ugly man, and other sightings. The ghost is said to be evil and to hates crucifixes.

The Connaught Tavern

Now known as The Fox@Connaught (since 2003), this pub dates from 1881 and is a Grade II listed building. Read More »

The Court Oak, Harborne

The Court Oak built in 1932 has a reputation of being haunted. The following Mirror article entitled 'Wine snob ghost 'haunting Birmingham pub smashes house wine bottles' dates from 30 October 2011. Read More »

The Crown and Horseshoes, Enfield

The Crown and Horseshoes public house is an 18th century Grade II listed building and can be found on Horse Shoe Lane, by the canal. The Crown and Horseshoes has in the past had a reputation for being haunted. “Other than the footsteps and the mysterious banging of doors, nothing much happens these days”, Joan Forman told the author and investigator Andrew Green in 1976. Read More »

The Crown Inn, Amersham

The reputedly haunted Grade II listed Crown was originally an old coaching inn dating back to the 16th century or 17th century* and now forms part of the Dhillon Group's family of modern coaching inns. Read More »

The Crystal Palace, Bath

Crystal Palace

The Crystal Palace on Abbey Green in Bath is so called in commemoration of The Grand Exhibition which took place in Hyde Park, London between 1 May 1851 and 15 October 1851. Prior to this name change, the Inn was known as The Three Tuns. Read More »

The Dead Hand

The "Dead Hand," or the "Holy Hand," as it is sometimes styled, alluded to in the foregoing tradition,is the centre around which quite a galaxy of marvellous tales have gathered. It is known to have belonged to Father Edmund Arrowsmith, a Jesuit, who suffered the extreme penalty of the law at Lancaster, on the 28th August 1628. Read More »

The Devil of Drakelowe

In 'Collections for a history of Staffordshire' (1880) we are introduced to the following account of the events surrounding the case know as The Devil of Drakelowe and the abandonment of the hamlet. The story may have its origins in the Anglo Saxon meaning of Drakelow, 'Dragons Mound' which may indicate a burial site with a guardian spirit. Read More »

The Devil's Apronful

In his  ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ (1888), Rev Thomas Parkinson gave the following account of how the stones known as The Devil's Apronful got their name. Read More »

The Devil's Arrows

The Devil's Arrows are three Neolithic Megaliths - the tallest of which is 23 feet high - standing in a crooked alignment of around 580 feet. The fourth stone was destroyed in the 16th century, when Camden noted that it had been pulled down by treasure seekers.

In legend they were thrown by the Devil from Howe Hill to destroy Aldborough, hence their common name. Read More »

The Devil's Bridge, Burnsall

There stories throughout Britain of the Devil building bridges and Rev Thomas Parkinson in his 'Yorkshire Legends and Traditions' (1888) gives the following account for the bridge over the River Dibb at Burnsall. Read More »

The Devil's Elbow

A curved stretch of road on the B6105 between Glossop and Woodhead is known as the Devils Elbow, it has been the scene of strange events and is associated with a Devil legend. Many place names in this area may have strange origins. Names such as Shining Clough and Lantern Pike suggest places associated with mysterious light phenomena. Read More »

The Dingle, Shrewsbury

Now an ornate pond in the civic gardens known as The Quarry, the Dingle is haunted by a ghost that was identified in the 1800s as Mrs Foxhall. She was burnt alive there in 1647 for the murder of her husband by poisoning.

The Duck, Aylesbury (Demolished)

The Duck public house closed in 2009 and was demolished the following year, so we will probably learn nothing anything new from this reputedly haunted building. Luckily the following article entitled 'Ghostly goings-on puzzle pub couple ' was published in the Bucks Herald on 18 February 2004. Read More »

The Duckworth Hall, Oswaldtwistle

John Fahey gave the following account of the haunting at The Duckworth Hall in his 30 October 2003 article entitled 'Spooky tales of a haunted Hyndburn' which was was published in the Accrington Observer. Read More »

The Dule Upo' Dun

‘A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 6’(1911) mentions that ‘On the road from Clitheroe to Waddington, near Brungerley Bridge, once stood an inn known as the 'Dule upo' Dun', from its sign representing the Devil galloping madly along upon a dun horse. Read More »

The Dun Cow & The Old Rib

In 'Lancashire Legends' (1873), John Harland shares the following piece of folklore.  'The anonymous writer of "Curious Corners round Preston," states that the "Old Rib " is the name giyen to an old farm in the township of Whittingham, in the parish of Kirkham, five miles north of Preston. Read More »

The Dun Cow, Shrewsbury

This Inn was built by Roger de Montgomery in around 1085, making it one of the oldest in Britain. Reputedly haunted by a monk. Read More »

The Eclipse Inn, Winchester

The Eclipse Inn dates from 1540 and over the past centuries the building has had many uses including a rectory, private residence, ale house (around 1750) and from the nineteenth century an Inn. Read More »

The Elephant & Castle, Amersham

Probably dating from the 17th century, The Elephant & Castle is another of Amershams reputedly haunted inns. In 2001 the following interview by Victoria Birch concerning the haunting appeared in the The Argus. Read More »

The Elms, Smithfield

Anne Askew

Smithfield haled a fairly prominent place in medieval London. Not only was it the site of a famous market and a place where Royalty held their tournaments, the Elms at Smithfield was also well known as a place of execution and it is thought that some of those who were cruelly killed at this spot may haunt it still. Read More »

The Embassy Of Finland, London

The Embassy of Finland at 38 Chesham Place dates from around the 1830s. It was not of course always an Embassy and has over the years been known by various names such as Belgrave House and Herbert House. It is from an early time, possibly when it was a private residence that the reputed haunting of the Embassy has its roots. Read More »

The Feathers Hotel

The Feathers

The Feathers Hotel is a beautiful seventeenth century building with a carved timber façade and a reputation of being haunted. It was originally built for an attorney called Rees Jones in 1619 and the Feathers name relates to the Ostrich Feathers that are part of the design in the exterior wooden façade. Read More »

The Flask Tavern

The Flask Tavern dates back to the 17th century and has served the likes of Karl Marx (born 5 May 1818 – died 14 March 1883), William Hogarth (born 10 November 1697 – died 26 October 1764) (painter) and Dick Turpin (born 1705 – died 7 April 1739) (highwayman) who is said to have been hidden there for a while. Read More »



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