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The Lost Child

Robert Hunt in his 'Popular Romances of the West of England; or, The Drolls, Traditions, and Superstitions of Old Cornwall' (1865) gives an account of the lost child of Trefonick which was given to him thirty years earlier by an old woman of the parish. Read More »

The Manchester Arms, Hull

The following story entitled 'Ghost captured on video at Manchester Arms pub in Hull's Old Town' was published in the Hull Daily Mail on 9 November 2012.

WHEN the landlady calls time, she is the visitor who refuses to leave. Read More »

The Manor Castle, Sheffield

This pub sits in the grounds of the now ruined Manor Castle (or Manor Lodge) in Sheffield and is haunted by the apparition of a figure. When encountered by Jack Wright, the new Landlord he moved his family straight back out after three weeks of being continuously haunted, if not by seeing the figure then by feeling a presence. Read More »

The Marine, South Shields

On Thursday 14 June 2012, the following story by Mike Howell entitled ‘High spirits at South Shields pub’ was published in the Shields Gazette. ’THE Marine is no ordinary pub. Read More »

Merry Maidens

Standing stones known as the Merry Maidens, lie Southeast of St Buryan, and are thought to date back to the Bronze Age. The circle consists of regular spaced granite stones, most under four feet in height. Read More »

The Millenium Devizes White Horse

In 1998, unaware of the now lost 1845 Devizes White Horse (aka Snobs Horse), Sarah Padwick who was new to the area wrote into the local newspaper suggesting that to celebrate the Millenium, a hill figure should be cut on Roundway Down. Read More »

The Monition of Cursing, Archbishop Gavin Dunbar of Glasgow

"Gude folks, heir at my Archibischop of Glasgwis letters under his round sele, direct to me or any uther chapellane, makand mensioun, with greit regrait, how hevy he beris the pietous, lamentabill, and dolorous complaint that pass our all realme and commis to his eris, be oppin voce and fame, how our souverane lordis trew liegis, men, wiffis and barnys, bocht and redeimit be the precious blud Read More »

The Mumby Boggart And The Crafty Farmer

A farmer bought a new field, which was inhabited by a squat, hairy boggart, a kind of troll. The boggart refused to allow the farmer to plant anything in the field, claiming it was his and the farmer had no right to it. The farmer, in turn, pointed out that he'd paid good money for the land and by right he ought to be able to use it. Read More »

The National Railway Museum

The National Railway Museum is the worlds largest museum dedicated to rail travel and covers over 300 years of worldwide history. One of the many exhibits, a sleeping car, is supposed to be haunted by an unknown prescence.

The New Crown Inn, Bath

The following historical description about The New Crown Inn at 21 Newbridge Hill and their reputed ghost can be found on their website.   Read More »

The New Inn, Gloucester

Dating from the mid 15th century, The New Inn is a Grade I listed building that originally served as hostelry for St Peter’s Abbey. In 1553 Lady Jane Grey (Born 1536 – Died 12 February 1554) was staying here when King Edward VI died. It was here that she was proclaimed Queen, a reign that lasted 9 days. Read More »

The Nun of Covent Garden

Covent Garden (or Convent Garden) was a 40 acre area owned by the Abbey of Westminster that was used as a market garden in the Middle Ages. It was managed through the issuing of leases by the Abbot of Westminster until the Dissolution of the Monasteries by King Henry VII between 1536 and 1541, when it was taken by the state and eventually passed into the private ownership of the Earl of Bedford. Read More »

The Old Black Lion, Northampton

This old public house has in the past been reputedly haunted with poltergeist type phenomena, with beer barrels that move. Phantom footsteps have also been heard moving around.

The Old Queen’s Head, Islington

The Old Queens Head

The Old Queen’s Head Public House (44 Essex Road) is a well known live music venue attracting world class bands and DJ’s, but this building that dates back to the early 19th century has a unique history and a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

The Old Rectory (Friary Court, Old Friary), Southfleet

Since the 1950s, the 14th century Grade II listed, Old Rectory on Hook Green Road has been divided into two residences, Friary Court and the Old Friary. The rectory, which had a reputation for being haunted in the 19th century, was probably built by Thomas de Alkham (Died 1356), rector of Southfleet from 1323 and the chancellor of Rochester Diocese from 1327. Read More »

The Old Rectory, Cheam

The Grade II listed Old Rectory on Malden Road in Cheam, dates from the early 16th Century and according to their website it is said to be haunted by around seven ‘shy’ ghosts. Read More »

The Palace, Kirkgate

Originally a merchants house built in 1741, The Palace had become a registered Inn by 1841, possibly due to the Beerhouse Act of 1830 which enticed private residences to be become public houses. Read More »

The Parish Church of St Michael, Cornhill

St Michaels’ Church in Cornhill is a Grade I listed building, built by Sir Christopher Wren between 1699 and 1672 following the destruction of the earlier medieval church in the Great Fire of London. It was in this now lost medieval building that according to legend a creature was encountered by the bell ringers early in the first half of the sixteenth century. Read More »

The Parish Church of All Saints North Street, York

All Saints North Street

All Saints is considered to be York's finest medieval church and has one of the best stained glass displays in Britain. Read More »

The Plough, Ormskirk

The following article by Jamie Bowman entitled 'Car crash awakens The Plough pub’s ghost according to landlady' was published in the Ormskirk Advertiser on 19 July 2012. Read More »

The Plough@Eathorpe

The Plough Inn (now The Plough@Eathorpe) is an 18th century coaching house situated on the Fosse Way, the Roman road that linked Exeter with Lincoln. There are stories associated with the pub being haunted. The outline of a figure is said to have been reported walking across the bar area and one member of staff is thought to have been poked in the shoulder whilst mopping the floor.

The Poplars, Deddington

There is an early mention of the house formerly known as Poplars having been haunted. This is included on the website just a piece of historical interest and to add to the geographical mapping of reported activity, old and young. Read More »

The Priest & The Prophetess: Joanna Southcott in the West Midlands

Joanna Southcott

Joanna Southcott was born in April 1750 in Taleford, and raised in the village of Gittisham in Devon, England. Read More »

The Result Of A Curse

The following account of an apparition being witnessed outside an unnamed West End church appraed in The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain (1897) by John Ingram. Read More »

The Roebuck, Richmond

Dating from around 1730, The Roebuck public house can be found at 130 Richmond Hill, Richmond and is well known for the amazing views it provides of the River Thames below. In 1972 it was reputedly the scene of a haunting type experience. Guy Lyon Playfair gave the following account of the case in ‘The Haunted Pub Guide’. Read More »



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