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The Theatre Royal, York

The Theatre Royal is reputed to be haunted by a ghostly nun who has been witnessed several times. The Theatre was built on the site of Old St Leonard's Hospital founded in the 12th century. The theatre also has a tradition about a Grey Lady, and the ghost of an actor who died in a duel.

The Thomas a Beckett Public House

The Thomas a Beckett Public House at 320 Old Kent Road is no longer open for business (now the Nolias Art Gallery) but the building still remains and it ihas  a rare and rich heritage, even without the ghosts.  Old Kent Road partially follows the route of what was Watling Street (the Roman road).  The pub got its name due to it being so close to what was St Thomas-a-W Read More »

The Three Crutches, Strood

One night in the 13th century a Templar Knight named Sir Richard or Reginald Braybrooke was murdered whilst travelling (probably) to Temple Manor after visiting Lord Cobham. He was shot through the heart by and arrow and his body was not discovered until the following day at a location where three roads met. The murderer was never caught or brought to justice. Read More »

The Three Mariners Inn, Scarborough

The Three Mariners

The Three Mariners Inn - which is now a museum dedicated to the history of smuggling in the area - dates back to the 1300s and, is the earliest licensed premises in Scarborough.

It is said to be haunted by a headless woman, who warns fishermen of impending disaster. Read More »

The Toby Carvery, Cleadon

Formerly known as The Britannia, this old coaching inn dates from the 17th century and has a reputation for being haunted. Read More »

The Town Of Ramsgate, Wapping

The Town Of Ramsgate public house is a Grade II listed building dating from the 17th century. Press Gangs were said to recruit drunks and imprison them in the cellars of pub, prior to them taking up their new career in the Navy. Read More »

The Treasurer's House

The Treasurer's House was the seat of the treasurers of York Minister from the 12th century to 1546. The last treasurer - William Cliffe - resigned, after all the treasure was removed during the dissolution of the monasteries. The house was extensively rebuilt in the 17th century. Read More »

The Trent Aegir

At Gainsborough, several times a year, can be seen a phenomenon known as the "Trent Aegir". This is a large tidal bore which rolls down from the Humber. It is known to have happened since at least the Viking era, as the name Aegir is taken from the Norse god of the sea. Read More »

The Undreamed Region: Barrows In Folklore & Archaeology

Hills, mounds and burial sites. Places which have a timeless allure. Such places can be seen and regarded as mythically liminal, a place that it is not a place. A place outside of time. A place where the living freely walk with the dead. Barrows are just such places. Read More »

The Volunteer, Baker Street

The Volunteer public house on Baker Street (so named as it recruiting up station during the war) is reputedly built upon the site of a large 17th Century house that was once owned by the Neville family. This building burnt down in 1654 and the Nevilles were lost in the flames. However, Rupert Neville is said to haunt the pubs cellars. Read More »

The Walworth Castle Hotel

Walworth Castle, near Darlington, County Durham, is a Best Western Hotel, with an extensive and complicated history. The current building is Grade 1 listed, and its medieval style was commissioned by its one time owner Thomas Jenison (died 1586), and completed circa 1600. Read More »

The West Kennet Long Barrow

West Kennet Long Barrow Sketch

West Kennet Long Barrow is one of the many prehistoric monuments that are part of the Avebury complex of Neolithic sites. It is one of the most impressive and well-preserved burial chambers in Britain, as well as being one of the most visited. Read More »

The West Kennet Long Barrow: Evidence of Occult Activities

Occult Symbol

[Please note the views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Mysterious Britain team]

To the average tourist the West Kennet Long Barrow is another ancient monument to look over and wonder at the way in which it was constructed, with numerous slabs of sarsen stone laid one upon another. Read More »

The WestGate, Bath

The following paragraph from the pubs in Bath website refers to it being haunted. 'Situated in the bustling centre not 100 metres from the famous baths, the WestGate is a lively meeting place with a twist on the traditional pub. Read More »

The White Hart Hotel, Buckingham

The White Hart Hotel was originally an 18th century coaching inn and is said to be reputedly haunted, though I am unsure as of yet what the details of the haunting may be.

The White Lady of Rochester Castle

Rochester Castle is situated in the City of Rochester, one side is the River Medway, Rochester Cathedral stands opposite and many Victorian and older buildings surround on all sides. The moat has long since silted up and was used as a graveyard. Read More »

The White Swan Hotel, Henley-in-Arden

The reputedly haunted 16th century White Swan Hotel can be found on High Street in Henley-in-Arden. Built on the site of an earlier Inn which dated 1352, the present White Swan was built around 1550. Read More »

The Windmill, York

A whole host of acitivity has been reported at The Windmill, including cold spots, strange footsteps, the apparition of a 18th centry ostler and spontaneous glass and bottle shattering.

The Wise Woman Of Littondale

The following legend of 'The Wise Woman Of Littondale' appeared in 'The Table Book' (1827) by William Hone (Born 3 June 1780 – Died 8 November 1842) and partially reprinted in ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ by Rev Thomas Parkinson (1888). Read More »

The Woolpack Inn, Chilham

According to The Woolpack Inn's website, this Grade II listed 600 year old building is haunted by a friendly Grey Lady that reputedly wanders the main building.

The Worlds End, Ecton

The Worlds End public house in Ecton dates from the 17th century and is said to be haunted by the ghost of barmaid who was killed by her jealous suitor. First mentioned in 1678 when it was then known as the Globe, it was rebuilt in 1765. Read More »

The Worm Of Sexhow

The Worm of Sexhow, according to ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ by Rev Thomas Parkinson (1888): ’Sexhow is a small hamlet or township in the parish of Rudby, some four miles from the town of Stokesley, in Cleveland. Upon a round knoll at this place a most pestilent dragon, or worm, took up its abode; whence it came, or what was its origin, no one knew. Read More »

The Written Stone, Dilworth

A large inscribed stone measuring eight feet long, two feet wide and one and a half feet deep was placed beside a old road (now known as Written Stone Lane) in Dilworth during the 17th century. The reason why the stone was placed is unknown, though several stories have grown up around it. The following account was published in 'Lancashire Legends' (1873) by John Harland & T T Wilkinson. Read More »

The York Arms, York

The York Arms is haunted by a Grey Lady. She also haunts the Theatre RoyalTheatre Royal, which stands across from it, this sounds like a linked legend, and it may be worth noting if there is a legend about a connecting tunnel.

Theatre Royal, Bath

Theatre Royal

The Theatre is haunted by a Grey Lady, she has been seen many times over the years by actors and actresses.  Legend suggests that she is the ghost of an actress who committed suicide in the Garricks Head next door, after a duel between her lover and her husband left her lover dead. Read More »



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