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Wavertree's Demon Well

According to James Mackinley in ‘Folklore of Scottish Lochs and Springs’ (1893) ‘At Wavertree, in Lancashire, once stood a monastery and beside it was a well. When pilgrims arrived, the occupants of the monastery received their alms. If nothing was given, a demon, chained to the bottom of the well, was said to laugh. Read More »

Wayland's Smithy

Wayland's Smithy

Wayland's Smithy is one of the most impressive and atmospheric Neolithic burial chambers in Britain. Read More »

Weeton Cairn Boggart

In the 1876 book entitled ‘History of the Fylde of Lancashire’ by John Porter, reference is made to an extensive barrow or cairn near Weeton Lane Heads which was accidentally opened. This burial chamber had the reputation of being haunted by a boggart or hairy ghost. Read More »

Welling Big Cat (2003)

Alison White in a Newshopper article entitled ‘Sightings of big cats rocket in past month’ (30 December 2006) metions that ‘In April 2003, teenager Daniel Brown disturbed a giant black cat in the back garden of his home in Preston Drive, Welling. Read More »

Wem Rekindled by Andrew Homer

Figure 5

Andrew Homer was involved in the Wem Town Hall “Girl in the flames” photographic anomaly right from when the story broke in 1995. He was one of the few ASSAP investigators to actually meet with the photographer, Tony O’Rahilly. Read More »

Wem Town Hall

Wem Town Hall

On 19th November 1995 Wem Town Hall burnt down. As this ninety year old building was burning some locals gathered to watch and one of them, Tony O'Rahilly, took a very interesting picture with a 200mm lens from the road. The picture, once developed, shows what appears to be a young girl in the doorway of the burning building. Read More »

West Walls, Carlisle

West Walls

The ghost of a Cavalier has been seen close to the West Walls early some mornings, though I am unaware of anyone seeing him recently. The West Walls are the last remaining example of Carlisle's defensive wall that encircled the early city. They served the city well especially during the Civil War when Carlisle was besieged by Cromwell's soldiers during 1644 and 1645. Read More »

Westbury White Horse

Westbury White Horse

A conventional looking horse it measures 107 feet tall and 175 feet across. The horse sits below Bratton Hill Iron Age fort. The hillfort has a Bronze Age barrow within its fortifications suggesting an earlier heritage. Read More »

Westminster Abbey

Since 1066AD, Westminster Abbey has been the traditional coronation and burial site for British monarchs, but there are no members of the Royal family among the ghosts that reputedly haunt here. Read More »

Whalley Abbey

In 1296, Cistercian monks moved from Stanlow Abbey and founded Whalley Abbey, with the first stone being laid by Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln, Baron of Pontefract, 10th Baron of Halton, Lord of Denbigh and 7th Lord of Bowland (Born 1251 – Died February 1311). Following the dissolution of the monasteries, Whalley Abbey was closed in 1537 and now stands in ruins. Read More »

Whalton Baal Festival

4 July - Whalton Baal Festival is a traditional Midsummer fire festival, probably deriving from Celtic times. Baal derives from an old word for light.

Wheeler End Common

A ghostly woman attired in a red dress has been seen crossing the road near here. She is allegedly the ghost of a young woman who died 2 weeks before her wedding day in 1776. She was last seen in 1943.

Directions: To the North of Lane End off the B482.

The Wherwell Cockatrice

Wherwell Cockatrice

Nothing now remains of Wherwell Priory and a Manor House now stands in its place. The priory was founded by Queen Elfrida, widow of King Edgar the Peaceful circa 986AD. Read More »

Whispering Knights

The remains of a portal dolmen burial chamber dating from around 4100BC the Whispering Knights can be as evocative as their name suggests, looming from the mist in the cool Warwickshire morning. They stand 5 to 8 feet in height and are close to the Rollright Stones in Oxfordshire with which they share folklore. Read More »

Whitby

Whitby is associated with a wealth of traditions and legends. The abbey, now a guant ruin, was built in 651AD and destroyed in a Danish raid in 870AD, it was reconstructed by the Benedictines in the 11th Century. At one time crowds used to gather at the West side of Whitby churchyard, where there was clear view of the North side of the abbey and the highest window. Read More »

Whitby Abbey

Whitby Abbey 2

Whitby Abbey is one of the most atmospheric locations in England. The desolate ruins stand stark above steep cliffs overlooking the old whaling village of Whitby in North Yorkshire, a testament to the town's former religious significance. Read More »

White Hart, Crystal Palace

On 4th March 2009 the following article by Jennifer Heape entitled ’ Crystal Palace pub's strange basement 'haunted by girl', appeared in the Streatham Guardian

Deep beneath the White Hart pub in Crystal Palace rumours of secret tunnels, hauntings and witchcraft abound. Read More »

The White Hart, Hemel Hempstead

The White Hart is said to be haunted by the ghost of a young man who was murdered while fighting off a press gang. He is thought to have died at the bottom of the stairs, where the figure of a man has been seen with a look of terror on his face.

White Horse Sarsen Stone

Mentioned as a item of possible interest to a visitor of Alton Priors, in the village is a sarsen stone with a copy of the Alton Barnes White Horse carved upon it. Read More »

White Lady of Shooters Hill

In the years around 1830 the area surrounding the Shooters Hill and the Well Hall Road junction was said to be haunted by strange “unaccountable noises” and the apparition of a white lady. The haunting was thought be some to be connected to the skeleton of an unidentified female skeleton unearthed by a labourer on 10 June 1844. The woman had a long golden hair and a fractured skull. Read More »

Whiteleas Ghost Plane

The following account of an experience with a phantom aircraft was published in the Shields Gazzette on Wednesday 4 February 2009 in an article entitled ‘Did Dougal see a ghost plane?’ Read More »

Whitmore Park Black Dog

According to ‘The Folklore of Warwickshire’ (1976) by Roy Palmer, a Black Dog ‘with a matted, shaggy coat and green eyes roams Whitmore Park at night. People avoid the area, since to see the dog means a death in the family’ It is thought that in 1949 this creature standing about six foot tall was seen on Watery Lane. Read More »

Whittlesey Straw Man

Some sources say this festival takes place on the Monday after twelfth night (Plough Monday), the tuesday following Plough Monday or the Saturday.  Either way,  a man is dressed from head to foot in straw bundles and dances around the town of Whittlesey, going from house to house looking for gifts of food, money and beer. Read More »

Who Put Bella in the Wych Elm?

Wych Elm

On 18th April 1943 four Stourbridge teenagers, Fred Payne, Tommy Willetts, Robert Hart and Bob Farmer discovered the remains of a woman inside a hollow Wych Elm (also known as Scots (Scotch) Elm or Ulmus glabra) in Hagley Wood. It has been suggested that ritualistic magic or even wartime espionage may have been behind this murder mystery that after sixty years is still a focus of interest. Read More »

Widow Webb of Barby

In the late 19the century a house in the village of Barby had a reputation of being haunted by a widow who could not rest until her estate and debts were settled in full. Read More »

The Dolphin Hotel, Littlehampton

Ellie and Katie along with their staff have created a warm and friendly pub with a traditional feel and traditional values. They have worked hard to turn the Dolphin into one of the safest, cleanest and most welcoming pubs around. Between them they have nearly 30 years experience in the pub and catering trade. Read More »



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