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The Parish Church of All Saints North Street, York

All Saints North Street

All Saints is considered to be York's finest medieval church and has one of the best stained glass displays in Britain. Read More »

The Parish of St Andrew, Leyland

The Parish of St Andrew in Leyland dates from 1220, though it is thought a church has been on this site since the 12th Century. The church has had several alterations over the centuries, but what I want to concentrate on is the initial construction of the first church and the siting legends associated with it. Read More »

The Pedlar of Swaffham

The following story entitled ‘The Pedlar of Swaffham’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. Read More »

The Plough, Ormskirk

The following article by Jamie Bowman entitled 'Car crash awakens The Plough pub’s ghost according to landlady' was published in the Ormskirk Advertiser on 19 July 2012. Read More »

The Plough@Eathorpe

The Plough Inn (now The Plough@Eathorpe) is an 18th century coaching house situated on the Fosse Way, the Roman road that linked Exeter with Lincoln. There are stories associated with the pub being haunted. The outline of a figure is said to have been reported walking across the bar area and one member of staff is thought to have been poked in the shoulder whilst mopping the floor.

The Poplars, Deddington

There is an early mention of the house formerly known as Poplars having been haunted. This is included on the website just a piece of historical interest and to add to the geographical mapping of reported activity, old and young. Read More »

The Priest & The Prophetess: Joanna Southcott in the West Midlands

Joanna Southcott

Joanna Southcott was born in April 1750 in Taleford, and raised in the village of Gittisham in Devon, England. Read More »

The Princess of Canterbury

The following tale entitled ‘The Princess of Canterbury’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. ‘IN days of yore, when this country was governed by many kings, among the rest the King of Canterbury had an only daughter, wise, fair, and beautiful. Read More »

The Princess of Colchester

The following tale entitled ‘The Princess of Colchester’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. ‘LONG before Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, there reigned in the eastern part of England a king who kept his Court at Colchester. Read More »

The Rake Inn, Littleborough

The old Grade II listed coaching house which has been known as The Rake Inn, Hayrake and now The Rake Mediterranean Tapas Restaurant, dates from the very late 17th century and has been a public house since at least 1734, when Abraham Whitehead was the landlord. Read More »

The Red Lion, Wombourne

The ghost of a mysterious lady has haunted The Red Lion for many years. When Frank and Lil Ward moved to the pub in 1963 they were told she was a previous landlady who had died falling down the cellar steps but this is debatable. Read More »

The Result Of A Curse

The following account of an apparition being witnessed outside an unnamed West End church appeared in The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain (1897) by John Ingram. Read More »

The Roebuck, Richmond

Dating from around 1730, The Roebuck public house can be found at 130 Richmond Hill, Richmond and is well known for the amazing views it provides of the River Thames below. In 1972 it was reputedly the scene of a haunting type experience. Guy Lyon Playfair gave the following account of the case in ‘The Haunted Pub Guide’. Read More »

The Rose & Crown, Hemel Hempstead

The Rose & Crown, Hemel Hempstead

The Rose and Crown in Hemel Hempstead was originally a butchers shop. In 1537 the owner is recorded as brewing mead for his workers. The ale business grew until it took over and the oldest ale house in the Old High Street, Hemel Hempstead began. Read More »

The Royal Oak, East Lavant

The 18th century Royal Oak public house and restaurant in East Lavant had a reputation of being haunted in the 1950’s. It has been suggested that the apparition of a bearded man has been seen in the back rooms and heard climbing the stairs during the evening. Read More »

The Royal Oak, St Neots

The Royal Oak no longer occupies 38 High Street in St Neots, but in 1963, Mr Hart the Landlord reported a strange and nasty smell that was considered to be paranormal in nature. Earlier in the in 20th century an exorcism was carried out in the building but the reason for it is unknown, though it can be assumed that the haunting went back many years.

The Royal Standard of England, Beaconsfield

Originally known as The Ship and dating from 1213, The Royal Standard of England on Brindle Lane, Beaconsfield is thought to be the oldest Free House in England and is reputedly haunted by two ghosts. Read More »

The Royal Victoria & Bull Hotel, Dartford

The Royal Victoria & Bull Hotel on High Street in Dartford is Grade II Listed and dates from 1703.  Originally it was a large coaching inn on the London to Canterbury and Dover road. Read More »

The Rufus Stone

Death of William Rufus

The Rufus stone (now encased in metal) erected by Earl De La Warr in 1745, marks the location where King William II of England (referred to as William Rufus due to his red faced complexion) died in a hunting accident on 2 August 1100. Some mystery still envelopes the events of his death. Read More »

The Salamander, Bath

Referred to locally as ‘The Sally’, The Salamander can be found at 3 John Street, Bath, a Grade II listed building dating back to 1736. Haunt like experiences have been reported here during this century at least, including unexplained footsteps and unaccounted for singing and talking being heard. Read More »

The Sands of Cocker

The following story entitled ‘The Sands of Cocker’ was published in ‘Goblin Tales of Lancashire’ by James Bowker (1878). Read More »

The Saracens Head Inn, Amersham

Two ghosts are thought to haunt this old 16th century coaching inn said to have been built from timbers taken from old ships. One of the ghosts is reputedly a serving wench dating from the 17th century and the second ghost, according to their website is a mystery.

The Screaming Skull of Burton Agnes Hall

The skull at Burton Agnes Hall is another famous screaming skull, although its exact whereabouts in the hall is unknown. It is thought to reside behind one of the walls, having been bricked up and forgotten about years before. Read More »

The Ship Inn, Oundle

The Ship Inn is a 14th century coaching house in picturesque Oundle. It supposed to be haunted by the ghost of a former landlord who committed suicide by jumping out of an upper story bedroom window, breaking his neck. His ghost has been encountered by several subsequent licensees and visitors to the Ship Inn alike.

The Siege of Lathom

Siege of Lathom

Nothing now remains of the original Lathom House, the last Royalist stronghold in Lancashire, which was besieged by Parliamentarian forces for three months in 1644. Read More »



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