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Warblington Parsonage

The parsonage in Warblington was said to be haunted in the late 17th century. Though I do not believe the building to exist today, I understand it may have stood on Pook Lane. Below is how the story was published in 1897 in ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain’ by John Ingram. Read More »

The Screaming Skull of Wardley Hall

The skull that resides at Wardley Hall is another skull with opposing legends to account for its existence. In tradition the skull - which was kept behind a panel - was supposed to be that of royalist Roger Downs who lived in the 17th century. Read More »

Warminster

Warminster was the centre of a UFO flap during the 1960s and 70s and became a UFO Mecca for many years. UFO groups and interested people held many sky watches in the area. Specifically from Cradle Hill and Starr Hill.

10 August 1965 Read More »

Warton Crag

Warton Crag is a large limestone hill with a few pieces of interesting folklore as described in Lancashire Folk-lore by Harland and Wilkinson 1867: “On the lower declivity of Warton Crag, in the parish of Warton (which abuts on Morecambe Bay and the Westmorland border), commanding a beautiful and extended prospect of the bay, a seat called 'The Bride's Chair’ was resorted to on the day Read More »

Wasdale Corpse Road

As Wasdale had no church early in its history, the deceased had to be carried over the fells to Eskdale for internment, and this route became known as the corpse road. This is haunted by the ghost of a horse carrying the body of woman tied to it. Read More »

Washington Old Hall

Washington Old Hall is a small 17th century manor owned by the National Trust and is reputedly haunted by a woman in a grey dress. Although not the original building, it is the ancestral home of George Washington's (first President of the United States) family though they then moved to Sulgrave Manor around1613. Read More »

Wassailing The Apple Trees - Carhampton

Wassail originates from the Old English "waes hael", meaning "be well".  It is a mulled cider or ale seasoned with honey and spices.  Wassailing the apple trees is a traditional way of blessing th etrees to ensure a good harvest.  Villagers would gather around the apple trees making a racket to awaken the tree spirits and scare away any lingering deamons.  The strongest tre Read More »

Wassailing The Apple Trees - Henfield

Wassailing the Apple Trees or Apple Howling as it is known in Sussex is a festival to bless the apple trees to ensure a good crop in the coming year.  The event takes place on Twelfth Night after dark.  A horn is blown and Morris Men form a torch lit procession to the oldest and strongest apple tree where they form a ring. Read More »

Watton Abbey

A private residence, Watton Abbey is a Grade I listed building dating from fourteenth and fifteenth centuries and built on the location of Watton Priory, which was a Gilbertine double monastery founded by Eustace fitz John (died 1157) in 1150, as a penance for having fought in the Battle of the Standard (aka Battle of Northallerton) (23 August 1138) on the Scottish side. Read More »

Wavertree's Demon Well

According to James Mackinley in ‘Folklore of Scottish Lochs and Springs’ (1893) ‘At Wavertree, in Lancashire, once stood a monastery and beside it was a well. When pilgrims arrived, the occupants of the monastery received their alms. If nothing was given, a demon, chained to the bottom of the well, was said to laugh. Read More »

Wayland's Smithy

Wayland's Smithy

Wayland's Smithy is one of the most impressive and atmospheric Neolithic burial chambers in Britain. Read More »

Weeton Cairn Boggart

In the 1876 book entitled ‘History of the Fylde of Lancashire’ by John Porter, reference is made to an extensive barrow or cairn near Weeton Lane Heads which was accidentally opened. This burial chamber had the reputation of being haunted by a boggart or hairy ghost. Read More »

Welling Big Cat (2003)

Alison White in a Newshopper article entitled ‘Sightings of big cats rocket in past month’ (30 December 2006) metions that ‘In April 2003, teenager Daniel Brown disturbed a giant black cat in the back garden of his home in Preston Drive, Welling. Read More »

Wem Rekindled by Andrew Homer

Figure 5

Andrew Homer was involved in the Wem Town Hall “Girl in the flames” photographic anomaly right from when the story broke in 1995. He was one of the few ASSAP investigators to actually meet with the photographer, Tony O’Rahilly. Read More »

Wem Town Hall

Wem Town Hall

On 19th November 1995 Wem Town Hall burnt down. As this ninety year old building was burning some locals gathered to watch and one of them, Tony O'Rahilly, took a very interesting picture with a 200mm lens from the road. The picture, once developed, shows what appears to be a young girl in the doorway of the burning building. Read More »

West Walls, Carlisle

West Walls

The ghost of a Cavalier has been seen close to the West Walls early some mornings, though I am unaware of anyone seeing him recently. The West Walls are the last remaining example of Carlisle's defensive wall that encircled the early city. They served the city well especially during the Civil War when Carlisle was besieged by Cromwell's soldiers during 1644 and 1645. Read More »

Westbury White Horse

Westbury White Horse

A conventional looking horse it measures 107 feet tall and 175 feet across. The horse sits below Bratton Hill Iron Age fort. The hillfort has a Bronze Age barrow within its fortifications suggesting an earlier heritage. Read More »

Westminster Abbey

Since 1066AD, Westminster Abbey has been the traditional coronation and burial site for British monarchs, but there are no members of the Royal family among the ghosts that reputedly haunt here. Read More »

Whalley Abbey

In 1296, Cistercian monks moved from Stanlow Abbey and founded Whalley Abbey, with the first stone being laid by Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln, Baron of Pontefract, 10th Baron of Halton, Lord of Denbigh and 7th Lord of Bowland (Born 1251 – Died February 1311). Following the dissolution of the monasteries, Whalley Abbey was closed in 1537 and now stands in ruins. Read More »

Whalton Baal Festival

4 July - Whalton Baal Festival is a traditional Midsummer fire festival, probably deriving from Celtic times. Baal derives from an old word for light.

Wheeler End Common

A ghostly woman attired in a red dress has been seen crossing the road near here. She is allegedly the ghost of a young woman who died 2 weeks before her wedding day in 1776. She was last seen in 1943.

Directions: To the North of Lane End off the B482.

The Wherwell Cockatrice

Wherwell Cockatrice

Nothing now remains of Wherwell Priory and a Manor House now stands in its place. The priory was founded by Queen Elfrida, widow of King Edgar the Peaceful circa 986AD. Read More »

Whispering Knights

The remains of a portal dolmen burial chamber dating from around 4100BC the Whispering Knights can be as evocative as their name suggests, looming from the mist in the cool Warwickshire morning. They stand 5 to 8 feet in height and are close to the Rollright Stones in Oxfordshire with which they share folklore. Read More »

Whitby

Whitby is associated with a wealth of traditions and legends. The abbey, now a guant ruin, was built in 651AD and destroyed in a Danish raid in 870AD, it was reconstructed by the Benedictines in the 11th Century. At one time crowds used to gather at the West side of Whitby churchyard, where there was clear view of the North side of the abbey and the highest window. Read More »

Whitby Abbey

Whitby Abbey 2

Whitby Abbey is one of the most atmospheric locations in England. The desolate ruins stand stark above steep cliffs overlooking the old whaling village of Whitby in North Yorkshire, a testament to the town's former religious significance. Read More »



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