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The Kings Arms, Peckham Rye

Kings Arms

132 Peckham Rye was once the address of The King’s Arms public house, which was hit by a bomb during a World War II German air raid I which eleven people lost their lives. The pub was rebuilt and overtime eventually became a nightclub named Kings on the Rye before finally being demolished in the late 1990’s by a block of flats. Read More »

The Kings Head Hotel, Cuckfield

The Kings Head Hotel is no longer open for business and the building has been changed into a residential mews (Kings Mews). However, this hotel which dated from at least 1832 (when Pigot's Directory of Sussex showed James Webber as the landlord) had a reputation of being haunted by a ghost known locally as Geranium Jane. Read More »

The Lady With The Lantern, St Ives

‘The Lady With The Lantern’(1) is a story which appeared in English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ by Edwin Sidney Hartland [1890]. It is reproduced below complete with footnote. Read More »

The Lamb Inn

The Lamb Inn

Demolished in 1905, The Lamb Inn became a centre of attention during the 18th century with an investigated and well reported poltergeist like haunting that lasted over a year. The Lamb Inn dated from 1651 and stood between Gloucester Land and Lawford Street. There is I believe nothing remaining of the old building now. Read More »

The Llandoger Trow, Bristol

Llandoger Trow

The Llandoger Trow is a fantastic looking building which dates from 1664 and can be found on King Street, across from the Theatre Royal in Bristol. The pub has a long tradition of serving those connected with the arts and the men who worked the sea. It also has a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

The London Stone

London Stone (4)

Mounted behind an iron grill in the wall of 111 Cannon Street (originally known as Candlewick Street) can be found what could be described as one of London’s most ancient monuments, The London Stone (also known as The Brutus stone). Read More »

The Lookout Inn, Lawe Top

The Lookout Inn stands opposite the partially reconstructed Arbeia Roman Fort which dates from around 120AD and served as a maritime supply base for the garrisons on Hadrian’s Wall. We probably should not be surprised to hear of a Roman ghost haunting The Lookout Inn. Read More »

The Lord Eldon, Knutsford

The 300 year old Lord Eldon public house is thought to be haunted by the ghost of Annie Sarah Pollitt, daughter of James Pollitt the landlord of the Lord Eldon in the late 19th century.  She was also, in 1864 crowned the first May Queen of Knutsford’s famous Royal May Day fair. Read More »

The Lost Child

Robert Hunt in his 'Popular Romances of the West of England; or, The Drolls, Traditions, and Superstitions of Old Cornwall' (1865) gives an account of the lost child of Trefonick which was given to him thirty years earlier by an old woman of the parish. Read More »

The Malt Shovel, Dudley

The Malt Shovel is situated in one of the most haunted areas of Dudley. One of the ghosts here is called the Blue Boy and is only seen in the upstairs windows of the pub usually as an indistinct, misty form.

Another of the apparitions is a small person who walks in accompanied by a black dog. When staff go to look where they have gone they are nowhere to be seen. Read More »

The Manchester Arms, Hull

The following story entitled 'Ghost captured on video at Manchester Arms pub in Hull's Old Town' was published in the Hull Daily Mail on 9 November 2012.

WHEN the landlady calls time, she is the visitor who refuses to leave. Read More »

The Manor Castle, Sheffield

This pub sits in the grounds of the now ruined Manor Castle (or Manor Lodge) in Sheffield and is haunted by the apparition of a figure. When encountered by Jack Wright, the new Landlord he moved his family straight back out after three weeks of being continuously haunted, if not by seeing the figure then by feeling a presence. Read More »

The Marine, South Shields

On Thursday 14 June 2012, the following story by Mike Howell entitled ‘High spirits at South Shields pub’ was published in the Shields Gazette. ’THE Marine is no ordinary pub. Read More »

Merry Maidens

Standing stones known as the Merry Maidens, lie Southeast of St Buryan, and are thought to date back to the Bronze Age. The circle consists of regular spaced granite stones, most under four feet in height. Read More »

The Millenium Devizes White Horse

In 1998, unaware of the now lost 1845 Devizes White Horse (aka Snobs Horse), Sarah Padwick who was new to the area wrote into the local newspaper suggesting that to celebrate the Millenium, a hill figure should be cut on Roundway Down. Read More »

The Miller at the Professor’s Examination

THERE once came to England a famous foreign professor, and before he came he gave notice that he would examine the students of all the colleges in England. After a time he had visited all but Cambridge, and he was on his road thither to examine publicly the whole university. Read More »

The Miners Arms, Gornal

The Miners Arms has played host to a few strange experiences. A figure has been seen a few times in the pub who simply disappears when he is spotted. He has been known to approach the bar as if to order a drink and then simply vanish. Read More »

The Monition of Cursing, Archbishop Gavin Dunbar of Glasgow

"Gude folks, heir at my Archibischop of Glasgwis letters under his round sele, direct to me or any uther chapellane, makand mensioun, with greit regrait, how hevy he beris the pietous, lamentabill, and dolorous complaint that pass our all realme and commis to his eris, be oppin voce and fame, how our souverane lordis trew liegis, men, wiffis and barnys, bocht and redeimit be the precious blud Read More »

The Mumby Boggart And The Crafty Farmer

A farmer bought a new field, which was inhabited by a squat, hairy boggart, a kind of troll. The boggart refused to allow the farmer to plant anything in the field, claiming it was his and the farmer had no right to it. The farmer, in turn, pointed out that he'd paid good money for the land and by right he ought to be able to use it. Read More »

The National Railway Museum

The National Railway Museum is the worlds largest museum dedicated to rail travel and covers over 300 years of worldwide history. One of the many exhibits, a sleeping car, is supposed to be haunted by an unknown prescence.

The New Crown Inn, Bath

The following historical description about The New Crown Inn at 21 Newbridge Hill and their reputed ghost can be found on their website.   Read More »

The New Inn, Gloucester

Dating from the mid 15th century, The New Inn is a Grade I listed building that originally served as hostelry for St Peter’s Abbey. In 1553 Lady Jane Grey (Born 1536 – Died 12 February 1554) was staying here when King Edward VI died. It was here that she was proclaimed Queen, a reign that lasted 9 days. Read More »

The New Leathern Bottle, Warfield

Dating from the late 17th century, The New Leathern Bottle is a Grade II listed building with a reputation of being haunted. According to their website a murder took place here. They state that ‘In the mid 1800s the Leathern Bottle, as it was then, was owned and run by the Careys. Hannah Carey was known to be a loose woman and would make herself available to the men of the area. Read More »

The New Talbot, West Bromwich

Despite the name the New Talbot is nearly a hundred years old and underwent refurbishment in 2012. After the pub manager lost his phone whilst cleaning up after hours he decided to check security camera footage to see where it had gone. Part of the footage shows the phone flying off a chair and landing on the floor. Read More »

The Noahs Ark, Tipton

The Noahs Ark was once run by an ex professional boxer, Tom Cartwright, who stood no nonsense from anyone.

Tom was rudely awoken one night by a figure he took to be an intruder. Naturally he brought his boxing skills to bear and attempted to floor the man standing by his bed. As his fists passed straight through the young man, he vanished into thin air. Read More »



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