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Carlisle Big Cat (2012)

The following article by Phil Coleman entitled 'Black Panther Spotted In Field Near Carlisle – Claim' appeared in the News & Star on 16 February 2012.

A bus driver has spoken of the moment he spotted what he believes may have been a large black panther in a field a few miles north of Carlisle. Read More »

Carlisle Big Cat (August 2012)

The following article entitled 'Couple Saw Big Cat Near Carlisle's Asda Superstore' appeared in the News & Star on 7 August 2012. Read More »

Carlisle Castle

Carlisle Castle

This building is reputed to be haunted by a ghostly woman. A soldier in 1823 was so frightened when he encountered her, that he bayoneted the apparition, impaling the wall behind it. The soldier fainted and died of shock the following day. Read More »

Carlisle Cathedral

Carlisle Cathedral

In 1868, a midget wearing old fashioned clothes and silver buckles on his shoes, was seen in the streets near the Cathedral but quickly vanished.

Carlisle Railway Station

Recent articles in the Cumberland News and Carlisle Living Magazine mention the re-opening of the Undercroft below Carlisle Railway Station for special tours this Halloween (2010) and mention the haunting like experiences that have reported both above and below ground at the station. Read More »

Carlisle's Cursing Stone

In 2001 a large stone inscribed with a curse was place in the underpass near Carlisle's Tullie House Museum. It was designed by a local Carlisle artist named Gordon Young and made by Andy Altman. Read More »

Carlisle's Haunting Past

As it will be Halloween soon I thought I would take a look at the haunting history of my home city of Carlisle and the surrounding areas. I decided to go on the late night tour of Carlisle city and train station. The tour (known more commonly as the Ghost walk) begins in the centuries-old station. Read More »

Carn Brea

Carn Brea was occupied from 3,900BC, and was protected from attack by stone ramparts. Archaeological evidence shows the settlement was attacked and burned down at some point in its history. Hoards of Celtic coins have also been found on the hill during excavation. Read More »

Carn Euny

Carn Euny Exterior

The remains of this Iron Age village dating from around 200BC, houses a 66-foot long fogou. A fogou is an underground passage, completed in stone and covered with earth. They date from the Iron Age period to the Roman occupation.

There is some speculation as to their purpose. Whether they are storage facilities, safe havens from attackers or channels for earth currents is debatable. Read More »

The Giant of Carn Galva

This tale tells of a gentle giant who lived in Cornwall, the land of giants, and a place where they were thought responsible for many of the natural landscape features. The story appears in Traditional and Hearthside Stories of West Cornwall by W. Botrell 1870. Read More »

Carn Gluze Long Barrow

Carn Gluze Long Barrow is a developed site that has seen burials over a long period of time. Early in the history of the barrow a deep shaft was built in the centre of the monument with steps leading down into it, its purpose is unclear although theories of ritual usage have been expounded. Read More »

Castle de Bergh

There is or rather was a very ancient castle in Lancashire near Liverpool called Castle de Bergh which belongs to a noble family of that name. Many years ago the possessor of the castle Mr de Burgh died and the castle was then let out to various of the tenantry among whom was a carpenter. Read More »

Castle Dore and the Tristan Stone

Castle Dore is an Iron age hillfort dating from around 200BC.  It was possibly home to Cunomonus a local king who had a son called Drustanus. The castle is also associated with the legend of Tristan and Isolde. Read More »

Castle Hill, Thetford

Castle Hill (Castle Mound or Military Parade) is the remains of Thetford's second castle, a 12th century motte and bailey castle which replaced the towns earlier 11th century Red Castle. Read More »

Castle Howe

The site of a fairy home on the banks of Bassenthwaite Lake.

Castle Rising

Castle Rising

The now ruined but still imposing Castle Rising with its extensive earthworks was built around 1140AD and is one of the most famous castles of its kind in the country. Back when it was built this area was a busy sea port, though it is now probably four miles from the waters of the North Sea. Read More »

Castlerigg Stone Circle

Castlerigg Stone Circle

Castlerigg Stone Circle is one of the finest in Cumbria, it is spectacularly situated within a panorama of rugged hills of ever changing character, depending on the mercurial Lakeland weather. Read More »

Castleshaw Roman Camp (Rigodunum)

Castleshaw Roman Camp

The original fort dates to the Flavian period, and was probably erected during the governship of Agricola (AD77 to AD83), when new Roman roads were being constructed in the Pennines as an aid to Roman expansion in the North. The larger fort became a smaller fortlet in the Trajanic era. Read More »

Castleton Garland

29th May - A Garland King and Lady ride around the parish boundary on white horses. A garland, which is a large cone of flowers, is placed over the king topped with a posy of flowers called the queen. After the tour the garland is placed on the church tower. The ceremony has ancient origins.

Cathedral Church of St Peter, York Minster

The largest gothic cathedral in northern Europe, York Minster dates from between 1220 and 1472. It is built upon the site of York's Roman Basilica and subsequently the location chosen for an early Christian Church (627AD – 640AD). Read More »

Cawood Castle

Cawood Castle was a palace of the Archbishop of York probably built upon an early Saxon fortification dating from the reign of King Athelstan (Æthelstan) 925AD - 939AD. During the English Civil War (1642–1651) Cawood was fought over several times and served as a prisoner of war camp. Read More »

Caxton Gibbet

The Caxton Gibbet stands on a small knoll between Cambridge and St Neots. Not far away is the pub of the same name, which has been haunted in the past by phantom footsteps.

According to a local story one of the early landlords intended to rob three wealthy travellers who were staying at the inn. Read More »

The Cerne Abbas Giant

Cerne Abbas Illustration

The Cerne Abbas Giant or the 'Rude Man' is one of the largest hillfigures in Britain, he (the figure's gender is beyond doubt) is one of two representations of the human form, the other being the Long Man of Wilmington in East Sussex. The giant, carved in solid lines from the chalk bedrock measures in at 180 feet high, and carries a huge knobbled club, which measures 120 feet in length. Read More »

Chanctonbury Ring

Chanctonbry Ring

Chanctonbury Ring is a hill on the Sussex Downs some 700 feet above sea level and, until the hurricane, which swept across Southern England, was crowned with beech trees. Excavations at the site showed that the ramparts dated from 300 BC. Remains of several Roman buildings were found during the early digs, along with various items and fragments of pottery. Read More »

Changelings

Changelings are part of Western Folklore, a child of a fairy type (Elf, Troll etc) which has been secretly swapped for a human baby and left in its place. George Waldron gave the following description of one he saw in the Isle of Man and it was subsequently reprinted in ‘The Science of Fairy Tales’ (1891) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. Read More »



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