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The Hellfire Club

Medmenham Abbey

"Hellfire Club" is a name that brings in mind a coven of hooded and caped Enlightment-era gentlemen practising all kinds of debauchery, Satan worship being the most prominent. Read More »

Holy Trinity Church, Penn

On Easter Sunday, 10 April 1955, Ruth Ellis shot and killed David Moffett Drummond Blakely outside The Magdala pub, Hampstead, London. He is buried in the graveyard extension of Holy Trinity Church in Penn (Plot 48). Ruth Ellis (Born 9 October 1926 in Rhyl) was convicted of his murder and subsequently hanged at Holloway Prison on 13 July 1955. Read More »

Hughenden Manor

Hughenden Manor is a Georgian Mansion now owned and opened to the public by the National Trust. It was the home of Benjamin Disraeli (21 December 1804 - 19 April 1881), Leader of the Conservative Party, Prime Minister between 1874 and 1880 and 1st Earl Beaconsfield from 1876. He is buried in a vault beneath St Michael's Church at Hughenden Manor and is said to haunt the house. Read More »

Ivinghoe Beacon

The National Trails Ridgeway footpath begins and ends at Ivinghoe Beacon on Beacon Hill. The remains of a late Bronze Age to Early Iron Age univallate hill fort and numerous barrows can be found here. The ramparts are 2m high in places and it is thought that the main ditch around the fort would have been 3.1 meters m wide and 2.2 meters deep. Read More »

Jack the Leather, Edlesborough

Jack the Leather was a highwayman who is said to have been caught whilst hiding in the stables of Church Farm. According to tradition, soldiers noticed the lathered farm horses that Jack had been exercising each night by riding them around the farm’s spring-fed moat. He was captured and dragged to a Gibbet at either Ivinghoe Beacon, or Gallows Hill. Read More »

Kings Head Inn, Aylesbury

Owned and run by the National Trust since 1925, the Grade II listed 15th century Kings Head on the Market Square is a fantastic building steeped in a rich history and I suppose it is only natural that it has a reputation of being haunted as well by several ghosts, including a nun. Read More »

Mary Blandy

Mary Blandy1

Mary Blandy (Born 1720) was executed on 6 April 1752 outside Oxford Castle for murdering her father, Francis Blandy at the request of her lover, Captain William Henry Cranstuon.  As with Mary Queen of Scots, Oliver Cromwell and several other famous ghosts, Miss Blandy reputedly haunts at numerous locations over several counties. Read More »

Near Burnham Abbey

Burnham Abbey was originally a house for Augustinian nuns dating back to 1265. It was surrendered on 19 September 1539 during the Dissolution of the Monasteries and then passed on through private ownership. The Abbey was a farm by 1719 and in 1916 was bought by The Society of the Precious Blood, Augustinian nuns in the Anglican Communion who remain there to this day. Read More »

Olney Houses & Devil Legends

The following stories associating the Devil with homes in Olney were published in ‘Olney, Bucks’ (1907) by Oliver Ratcliff. ‘According to legendary accounts the Devil seems to have frequently favoured Olney with his presence. Read More »

Parish Church of St Peter and St Paul, Olney

According to ‘A History of the County of Buckingham: Volume 4’ (1927) ‘A church existed in the parish from a very early period, probably long before 1273, the date of the first known reference, but the present structure was built during the middle of the 14th century, the chancel being erected first and the other parts of the building some few years later. Read More »

Pednor Bottom, Road Ghost

The hamlet of Pednor near Chesham is reputedly haunted by a road ghost. It is said the apparition has been seen at Pednor Bottom, a valley just south of Pednor. Unfortunately key details change depending upon which version of the experiences you read. Within a short period of time the apparition was reportedly experienced twice. Read More »


A ghostly horseman is said to gallop through the lanes of Penn in the night shrieking with laughter, he disappears as fast as he appears.

The spirit is identified as that of an 18th century farm labourer.

Directions: Penn lies to the East of High Wycombe on the B474.

Slaptonbury Mill

There is a ghost legend attached to Slaptonbury Mill, of which not even ruins remain. Read More »

St Bartholomew's Church, Fingest

St Bartholomews Church is a Grade I listed building and dates back to the 12th century. There is a folk good luck custom associated with weddings at St Batholomews, where the groom is expected to lift his bride over the church gate after the ceremony. To ensure this is done the church gate is usually kept locked on such occasions. Read More »

The Bell, Edlesborough

Now a private residence, The Bell was a Grade II listed public house dating from the mid 18th century. The Luton Paranormal website refers to a time after 1984 when John and Margaret Pilgrim lived there. Read More »

The Boot & Slipper Public House, Amersham

The 15th century Boot & Slipper Public House, part of the Chef & Brewer chain has a reputation of being haunted by a ghost that is usually felt rather than seen. Read More »

The Chequers, Amersham

During the sixteenth several martyrs were burned in Amersham on charges of heresy and the strong conviction of their beliefs. The Chequers at 51 London Road, which dates from the 15th century had a possible involvement with these sad deaths and it is speculated that the long reputed haunting of the inn may be related to them. Read More »

The Crown Inn, Amersham

The reputedly haunted Grade II listed Crown was originally an old coaching inn dating back to the 16th century or 17th century* and now forms part of the Dhillon Group's family of modern coaching inns. Read More »

The Duck, Aylesbury (Demolished)

The Duck public house closed in 2009 and was demolished the following year, so we will probably learn nothing anything new from this reputedly haunted building. Luckily the following article entitled 'Ghostly goings-on puzzle pub couple ' was published in the Bucks Herald on 18 February 2004. Read More »

The Dun Cow, Olney

Possibly having been located at 2 Yardley Road, the Dun Cow inn is now long gone. In his almanac ‘Olney, Bucks’ (1907), Oliver Ratcliff gives the following story about the pub. ‘The old Dun Cow Inn, which stood on the Yardley Road, was also reported to be haunted. Read More »

The Elephant & Castle, Amersham

Probably dating from the 17th century, The Elephant & Castle is another of Amershams reputedly haunted inns. In 2001 the following interview by Victoria Birch concerning the haunting appeared in the The Argus. Read More »

The Royal Standard of England, Beaconsfield

Originally known as The Ship and dating from 1213, The Royal Standard of England on Brindle Lane, Beaconsfield is thought to be the oldest Free House in England and is reputedly haunted by two ghosts. Read More »

The Saracens Head Inn, Amersham

Two ghosts are thought to haunt this old 16th century coaching inn said to have been built from timbers taken from old ships. One of the ghosts is reputedly a serving wench dating from the 17th century and the second ghost, according to their website is a mystery.

The Two Brewers

The Two Brewers public house is a Grade II listed building which according to the 1907 ‘Olney, Bucks’ almanac by Oliver Ratcliff has a Devil legend associated with it. ‘There is an inn, called the Two Brewers, which he used to visit frequently, causing the host to play the fool and dance at his bidding. Read More »

The White Hart Hotel, Buckingham

The White Hart Hotel was originally an 18th century coaching inn and is said to be reputedly haunted, though I am unsure as of yet what the details of the haunting may be.



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