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Battle Abbey

On 14 October 1066 the Battle of Hastings took place. The Saxon King Harold II, defending Britain with 7500 infantry engaged the invading Norman army of William Duke of Normandy. William had mustered a fleet of 700 ships to bring his 2200 cavalry, 1700 archers and 4500 infantry across the English Channel from Northern France. Read More »

Boarshead, Crowborough

In an article entitled 'Ghostly goings-on in the forest and beyond', the Kent and Sussex Courier made the following refernce to a haunting on 23 December 2011. Read More »

Brede Ogre

According to local legend, a child eating ogre in Brede Park was identified as the Sheriff of Surrey and Sussex, Sir Goddard Oxenbridge of Brede Place. Said to have stood seven foot tall (most likely just over 5 foot), he was also known as the Brede Giant. Oxenbridge died on 10 February 1531 and his tomb (constructed in 1537) can be found in the Parish Church of St George in Brede. Read More »

Brede Place

Originally dating from the 14th century, Brede Place is a Grade II listed building that was then rebuilt in the 15th century by Sir Robert Oxenbridge, father of Sir Goddard Oxenbridge, the Bede Giant. For a time the house was associated with smugglers and some haunt like stories were told to keep the locals away. Read More »

Church Hill, Crowborough

There is a siting legend associated with The Church of St John the Evangelist, whch was consecrated on 31 July 1839. The orignal site that was chosen is said to have been to the West, on Church Hill near Friar's Gate. As with other siting legends the stones would be moved each night and positioned in the current spot. Read More »

Deans Place Country Hotel

Dating from the 17th century and formerly being the moated manor house of a large farm estate, the Grade II listed Deans Place has been a hotel since the start of the 20th century. The building has a reputation of being haunted by a female figure in a long blue dress or robe. Read More »

Herstmonceux Castle

A 15th Century castle was one of the first to be built from brick. It is a former home of the Royal Observatory (from 1946) and now part of The International Study Centre of Queen's University (Ontario). Read More »

Pevensey Castle

Between 300-340AD the Roman fort of Anderitum was built, one of the last and strongest of the south forts. It formed part of the Litus Saxonicum (Saxon Shore) a series of defensive positions designed to defend Roman Britain from the threat of the Saxons. This fort formed the foundations of Pevensey Castle. Read More »

St Andrew's Parish Church, Alfriston

St Andrew’s Parish Church is a Grade I listed building dating back to 1370. It was built in a cruciform shape and is referred to as The Cathedral of the Downs. There is a siting legend attached to St Andrews Church dating back to its original construction. Read More »

St Lewina

St Lewina was a young British virgin who was martyred by Saxons on 24 July 687AD (whilst Theodore was 7th Archbishop of Canterbury). Following her death she was buried at Seaford, near Lewes in East Sussex. Read More »

The White Way, Alfriston

The White Way is a road running between Alfriston and Seaford, which according to local legend has a reputation for being haunted. According to tradition, one Midsummers Eve, a young man, who was the heir to the Chowne* estate was killed with his dog (possibly a white terrier) near Dean’s Place and quickly buried in a shallow grave. Read More »

Uckfield Black Cat (2013)

The Sussex Express published the following article entitled 'Big Cat sighted at Uckfield' on 31 May 2013. 'A group of members of staff from Uckfield Community Hospital, were working a night shift when they glanced towards the window as something had caught their eye. Read More »

Walshes Road, Jarvis Brook

In an article entitled 'Ghostly goings-on in the forest and beyond', the Kent and Sussex Courier referred to the following ghost in 23 December 2011.
Read More »

Ye Olde Smugglers Inne, Alfriston

Partially dating from 1358, and originally known as The Market Cross Inn or Market Cross House, this public house changed its name in the 1920’s and now reflects its association with Stanton Collins, the leader of the Alfriston gang and their smuggling activities. Read More »



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