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Pitt Place

Pitt place was built on a chalk pit by the banker and Member of Parliament Alderman William Belchier between 25 February 1755 (when his former house on Chalk Lane, Epsom, burned down) and August 1759. Read More »

Pond Square Chicken, Highgate

Pond Square

Pond Square in Highgate has the reputation of being haunted by the apparition of a chicken. Not just any fowl though, this chicken is rumoured to be the worlds first frozen chicken which participated in the final fatal experiment of Sir Francis Bacon, Viscount of St. Read More »

Puddle Dock 1674

In 1674 a publication entitled ‘News from Puddle-Docke in London, or, A Perfect particuler of the strange apparitions and transactions that have happened in the house of Mr. Edward Pitts next door to the still at Puddle-Dock’ was printed. As the title suggests it concerned the reported haunting Edward Pitts home. Read More »

Red Lion Square

Cromwell's Execution

Laid out in 1698, Red Lion Square is on the boundary between Holborn and Bloomsbury and was named after the Red Lion Inn that used to be on the site. Red Lion Square is reputedly haunted by the regicides Oliver Cromwell, John Bradshaw and Henry Ireton. Read More »

Royal Air Force Museum, Hendon

S-Sugar

Opened on 15 November 1972, the Royal Air Force Museum displays 100 aircraft within it’s five exhibition halls. This collection includes a Hawker Typhoon, one of the two remaining Vickers Wellingtons and probably the most famous of the Avro Lancaster bombers, R5868 'S-Sugar' (S for Sugar), which was the first RAF heavy bomber to complete 100 operational sorties during World War II. Read More »

Sarah Siddons School

Sarah Siddons on North Wharf Road opened opened in 1961 as a secondary school for girls from Regent’s Park and Bellfield Schools. Part of North Westminster Community School since 1980, the Paranormal Database website suggests that it was haunted by the ghost of the Welsh actress, Sarah Siddons (Born 5 July 1755 – Died 8 June 1831) wearing a blue dress and a small hat. Read More »

Shooters Hill Big Cat (1963)

On 18 July 1963 a large cat was seen by a lorry driver traveling up the western side of Shooters Hill. He saw what he thought was an injured animal, possibly a dog and stopped to give it assistance. The animal got up and fled into the woods. It had a curled tail and was golden in colour. It had some prey in its mouth and it appears that the driver disturbed ait whilst it was feeding. Read More »

Sidcup Big Cat (2005)

Alison White in a Newshopper article entitled ‘Sightings of big cats rocket in past month’ (30 December 2006) gives the following account of a reported big cat encounter in Sidcup. Read More »

Smithfield Horned Figure (17th Century)

The sale of meat at Smithfield can be traced back over 800 years and in the 17th century an apparition of a horned figure reputedly terrorized the area leaping over the butchers stalls. When some of the butchers hit the figure with their cleavers and knives the blades apparently they passed straight through him without leaving a wound.

Southampton Fields and The Brothers Footsteps

An area behind the British Museum was known as Southampton Fields. Read More »

Spring Heeled Jack – The Terror of the Black Country

Out of the dark, supernatural depths of Victorian England one name stands out. Jack.

Not Jack the Ripper, but a more supernatural fiend - Spring Heeled Jack! Read More »

Spring Heeled Jack? Ewell 2012

The following story by Lauren May entitled 'Paranormal experts weigh in on dark figure mystery' appeared in the Epsom Guardian 8 March 2012 and concerns a strange experience reported by multiple witnesses that took place on Valentines Day. Read More »

St Andrews Church, Cobham

St Andrews in Cobham dates back to the 12th century, though it has been through extensive renovation during its 800 year history. The church is supposed to be haunted by a strange apparition, that of a blue donkey.

St Batholomew the Great Parish Church

Rahere

Founded in 1123 by Rahere, a jester/minstrel in the court of King Henry I (1068 – 1 December 1135), making this one of the oldest churches in London. Originally established as an Augustinian Priory Church, its nave was demolished in 1539 when King Henry VIII ordered the Dissolution of the Monastery’s. Read More »

St Botolph's Church without Bishopgate

St Botolph Picture

In 1982 Chris Brackley took a famous photograph whilst he was in St Botolph’s Church. The photograph was of the interior of the church, taking in the aisle, altar and main stain glass window. In the upper right hand side of picture there appears to be ghostly image of a figure dressed in period costume in the Choir Loft. Read More »

St James's Church Garlickhythe

St James's Church Garlickhythe

St James's Church Garlickhythe is an ancient church that was destroyed during the Great Fire of London of September 1666 and rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren (opening on 10 December 1682, though the tower was not finished until 1717). Read More »

St James's Palace

John Ingram recounts the following experience with an apparition at St James's Palace, in his 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain (1897)'. Read More »

St James’s Park

St James's Park 1833

Dating from 1536, measuring 58 acres, St James’s Park, named after a thirteenth century leper hospital which was dedicated to St James the Less, is the oldest of the Royal Park’s in London and is reputedly haunted by a murdered headless woman in red. Read More »

St Magnus the Martyr Church

St Magnus the Martyr

St Magnus the Martyr was the second church to be damaged during the Great Fire of London in 1666 and was subsequently rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren (born 20 October 1632 – died 25 February 1723) at a cost of £9,580. Read More »

St Mary’s Church, Wanstead

The current St Mary’s dates from 1787 and is a Grade I listed building designed by Thomas Hardwick. The earlier church stood 70’ south of the present building and was demolished when the newer church was completed in 1790. The later church does have some monuments inside it that were originally from the older one and according to tradition it may have a few apparitions as well. Read More »

St Nicholas's Churchyard, Chiswick

St Nicholas's Church, Chiswick

St Nicholas’s Church on Church Street in Chiswick is reputedly haunted by two of Oliver Cromwell’s daughters and there is even a legend associated with the church suggesting that the Lord Protector himself may have finally found peace there. Read More »

Strange Mitcham by James Clark

Strange Mitcham

Strange Mitcham by James Clark was first published as a booklet in 2002 as part of ASSAP's (Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) Project Albion. It was updated and republished in 2011 giving James the opportunity to add a few more articles and further information. Read More »

Swains Lane

Dating from at least 1492 when it was referred to as Swayneslane, it was one of four old parallel pathways leading up to Highgate village. (The others being West Hill, Bromwich Walk (now disappeared) and Dartmouth Hill). Also known for a long time as Swines Lane, it passed between agricultural land giving access to the farms on either side of it. Read More »

Swearing on the Horns

Swearing on the Horns

Between the 17th and 19th centuries there was a folk custom in the Public Houses and Inns of Highgate known as the ‘Swearing on the Horns’. Read More »

Sydenham Black Panther

In March 2005 a large black cat attacked a Sydenham resident named Anthony Holder. The story of the incident appeared in the Daily Mail on 23 March 2005 in an article (featured below) by Sam Greenhill entitled ‘The night I was mauled by London's 'black panther’ Read More »



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