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All Saint's Church, Easington

Originally dating from 1190AD, the Parish Church of All Saints is a Grade I listed building. The grave yard attached to the church was used up to 1883, after which a closure order was made. Read More »

Awd Simmon Beeather

A Glossary of Words used in Holderness (1877) gives the following description for the word Simmon and mentions an associated ghost. ‘Simmon, pounded brick or tiles, used by brick-layers for colouring the mortar. Beating simmon was formerly the hard labour punishment in Beverley Borough Gaol. Read More »

Ba’l Hill, Neolithic Round Barrow

The Neolithic round barrow at Wold Newton stands nearly three meters and has a diameter of around 40 meters. It stands beside an intermittently flowing stream known as the Gypsey Race. It was excavated in 1894 by JR Mortimer.

Church of St. Andrew, Bugthorpe

It has been suggested that burying someone face down is a sign of disrespect for the deceased and a way to possibly humiliate them. One such burial may have taken place in Bugthorpe (or Buckthorpe) Churchyard according to Rev. J. W. Appleford in his 1880 book 'A Brief Account of the Parish and Church of St. Read More »

Cobbler’s Well

The following story of Cobbler’s Well was printed in ‘County Folk-Lore Volume VI - Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning The East Riding of Yorkshire (1911)’ which was edited by Eliza Glutch. ‘In a hollow on Beverley Westwood is a stone trough, into which a spring of exceedingly cold pure water once flowed abundantly. Read More »

Drummers Well, Harpham

The drumming well located near to the church is reputed to foretell death in the family of St Quentin. The folklore relates to a story about a fourteenth century drummer called Tom Hewson, who was accidentally knocked down the well by a St Quentin squire. His mother put a curse on the family predicting that the sound of drumming from the well would predict death in the family. Read More »

Easington Hall

Easington Hall was the seat of the Overton family and although I don’t know exactly where it was in Easington, I have come across a reference to it being on the principle street in the village. Read More »

East Yorkshire News Year's Traditions

The following New Year traditions from East Yorkshire were published in 'County Folk-Lore Volume VI - Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning The East Riding of Yorkshire (1911)’ which was edited by Eliza Glutch.

All peacock feathers must be thrown out before New Year's Day, or else you will have ill luck.
  Read More »

Fimber Crossroads

The following extract is taken from ‘History of Fimber. A treatise on Agricultural Improvements, Memories of Remarkable Events and Village Tales' by T. Edmondson (1857), in which he describes local folklore concerning the haunting of the crossroads at Fimber. Read More »

Gypsy Race

The Gypsy runs from the Great Wold Valley and out into the North Sea at Bridlington. Bad fortune is said follow when the Gypsey Race flows. The following description of the Gypsey Race was published as response to a letter in the Bridlington Free Press on Wednesday 21 May 2008. Read More »

Halliwell Boggle

Between Atwick and Bewholme, at the foot of the hill on which Atwick church stands, there is a spring and pool of water overhung by willows haunted by the Halliwell Boggle. A boggle is an imaginary hobgoblin, without any special form, causing fear and terror. — [Folk-Lore of East Yorkshire' by John Nicholson (1890)]

Haunted Hull by Mark Riley

Haunted Hull by Mark Riley

The bustling city of Hull has a long and distinguished history, but the area also harbours some disturbing secrets. Discover the darker side of Hull with this terrifying collection of spine-chilling tales from around the city. Read More »

Headless Horseman, Atwick

Between Atwick and Skipsea there races along-occasionally the headless man mounted on a swift horse. - [Folk-Lore of East Yorkshire' by John Nicholson (1890)]

Headless Man, Frodingham

Between Frodingham and Foston a headless man haunts the road, but he has only been seen once. — [Folk-Lore of East Yorkshire' by John Nicholson (1890)]

Hull Christmas Traditions

According to 'County Folk-Lore Volume VI - Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning The East Riding of Yorkshire (1911)’ edited by Eliza Glutch. 'On Christmas morning in Hull the children come in droves, pealing at your door-bell in order to wish you "a merry Christmas." The following is a favourite doggerel: Read More »

Hull Masonic Hall, Dagger Lane

The following article entitled 'Hunt for Charlie the ghost at Hull Masonic Hall in Dagger Lane' was published in the Hull Daily Mail on 22 November 2014.  It concerned a paranormal investigation to raise money for charity. Read More »

Llyn-Yr-Avave or the Beaver Lake

According to Oliver's Beverley and The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893),‘The origin of Bever-lee, the town of Beverley, which was in the ancient wood Deira, is referred to in the old religious ceremony of drawing the shrine, or emblematical Beaver, out of the lake in the wood, and placing it in security on an eminence in the sight of the assembled Read More »

Nutwood Big Cat (2012)

Add to that the eerie atmosphere of dense woodland at night and it is enough to make the hairs on your neck stand on end.

But, that is what greeted two men who were out on a shooting trip in an East Yorkshire wood. Read More »

Priory Church of St Mary, Bridlington

The Priory Church of St Mary is a Grade I listed building and stands on the site of an Augustine Priory founded in 1113 and dissolved during the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1538. There is a story associated with the Priory Church and the name for Bridlington folk, Bolliton (or Bollington, Burlington) Jackdaws” Read More »

Riding The Stange

‘This is another species of popular punishment which formerly prevailed at Beverley, but is now deservedly fallen into desuetude. The ceremony was performed when a husband had been guilty of beating his wife, or vice versa ; and was as follows. Read More »

The Rudston Monolith

Rudston Monolith

Standing in the Norman churchyard of All Saints Church, the Rudston Monolith is the highest standing stone in Great Britain at 7.6m (25ft) with a 5m circumference and an estimated weight of 40 Tonnes.

An experiment run by William Strickland in the 18th century suggests the stone may extend underground to a similar depth as it high above ground. Read More »

Screaming Skull of Lund

I cannot find any details about this story apart from the following reference Folk-Lore of East Yorkshire' by John Nicholson (1890). 'There is a similar tradition (to that of Burton Agnes Hall) respecting the Manor House at Lund, where the skull has been walled u Read More »

Skipsea Castle

Skipsea Castle dates from around 1086 and was one of the early Norman period Motte and Bailey Castles. The remains of the castle which was destroyed in 1221 when William de Froz II rebelled against King Henry III (born 1 October 1207 – died 16 November 1272) are traditionally thought to be haunted by a white lady, the wife of Drogo de la Bouerer, who founded the castle. Read More »

St Catherine's Church, Barmby Moor

Dating from around 1272, St Catherine's Parish Church was largely rebuilt in 1850 replacing much of the original Norman building. In the churchyard, just south of the main door is a stone which has been speculated may have been a place of pagan worship. Read More »

St John's Well, Harpham

The well of St John of Beverley can be found beside the road on the east side of Harpham. St John (died 7 May 721) was born in Beverley and on his feast day (7th May) it is decorated and a procession of the choir and congregation of Beverley Minster make their way to it from the church in Harpham. Read More »



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