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All Saints Church & The Holbeach Gamblers

There were once four men of Holbeach, by the names of Slator, Watson, Barker and Codling who would, in the closing years of the 18th century, would regularly meet at the Chequers Inn in the town. Their heavy drinking was always accompanied by rowdy gambling over the card table, until, one day in 1793, the death of Mr. Codling put and end to their sport. Read More »

Bardney Abbey

Bardney Abbey

If visiting the home of a Lincolnshire family, someone leaving a door open might be asked the unusual question "Do you come from Bardney?" This is said in a similar tone and meaning to "Were you born in a barn?" elsewhere in the country. The saying has its roots in an old tale about a miraculous occurrence at Bardney Abbey. Read More »

Barnoldby le Beck

The Churchyard of St Helen’s in Barnoldby le Beck and the fields and surrounding the village have been said to be haunted by a Shag-Foal, a rough coated goblin horse, described as a cross between a black dog and a horse. Read More »

Best Western The Vine Hotel, Skegness

The Lincolnshire coast was once a major focus of smuggling in Britain. Read More »

Byard's Leap

Black Meg was a man-eating ogress who lived in a cave on the wild and lonely expanse of Ancaster Heath. She terrorised the countryside for miles around, devouring anyone she came across. Her foul, evil spells made the land barren and she used her long iron claws to maul and kill livestock. Read More »

Church of St John the Baptist, Northorpe

According to tradition, the churchyard of the Grade I listed St John the Baptist’s Church in Northorpe was reputedly haunted by a black dog. In County Folk-Lore, By Mrs Gutch and Mabel Peacock, 1908 they state that the dog ‘went by the well-known name of the Bargest’. Read More »

Epworth Old Rectory

Epworth Rectory has a lot of historical interest, being the childhood home of John Wesley, the founder of Methodism. His father, the Revd. Samuel Wesley, arrived at the rectory with his wife Susanna in 1696. Thirteen years later, the original house was destroyed by fire. Read More »

Green Lady of Thorpe Hall

Historically, Thorpe Hall was owned by the Bolle family, one of the most colourful of whom was Sir John Bolle (born 1560 - died 3 November 1606). A swashbuckling Elizabethan adventurer, gentleman and patriot, Bolle took part in Sir Walter Raleigh's 1596 attack and capture of Cadiz. Read More »

Haunted Grimsby by Jason Day

Haunted Grimsby

Join Paranormal Investigator Jason Day as he takes you on a journey around haunted Grimsby in the latest book in the Haunted series published by The History Press. Read More »

Healing Wells at Healing

The village of Healing near Grimsby has two notable healing wells, though they are probably not the source of the villages name. In the Domesday Book, Healing is shown as being Hegelinge, an Anglo Saxon term, possibly similar to Hægelingas meaning ‘the sons or followers Hægel’. Read More »

Julian's Bower

The village of Alkborough lies at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Trent and overlooks the Humber. The village's claim to fame is a bizarre circular turf maze of unknown origin. Read More »

The Mystery of Lincoln Cathedral

Lincoln Cathedral

There is a suspicion of true irony in the fact that Hollywood came to film scenes of Dan Brown's 'The Da Vinci Code' at the splendid Gothic Cathedral of Lincoln, since it has been discovered that it has its own authentic code entwining with the global mystery of Rennes-le-Chateau, starting with the discovery of a strange depiction at the scene of The Last Supper at the Great East Window, whereupon Read More »

Little St. Hugh of Lincoln

Stories of blood libel are not unfortunately unknown in Britain and like central Europe we have our antisemitic stories such as those surrounding William of Norwich, Simon of Trent, Robert of Bury, Harold of Gloucester and Little St. Hugh of Lincoln. Read More »

Maiden Well, North Kelsey

Maiden Well Lane in North Kelsey was probably named after the Maiden Well which was visited on St Mark’s Eve (April 24th) by unmarried women in order to discover, through divination who they will marry. Read More »

Metheringham Lass

A phenomena has been reported by many shaken drivers who have passed the former RAF airfield at Metheringham, Lincolnshire, late at night. At first glance this appears to be a version of the "Vanishing Hitchhiker" stories which are common all over the world, but there are some deviations from the usual story. Read More »

Observatory Tower, Lincoln Castle

On 13 April 2004 the following story was published in the Lincolnshire Echo detailing a family's strange experience at Lincoln Castle's Observatory Tower.

A Family got the fright of their lives when they stumbled on what they believe was a malevolent ghost in Lincoln Castle. Read More »

Old Mother Nightshade of Gedney Dyke

Until the middle of the 20th century the villages of the Lincolnshire fens were isolated, insular places. Everyone tended to know everyone else and a stranger in town would be cause for much suspicion and gossip. It was during the early 18th century, that an old fenwoman who lived in the village of Gedney Dyke, became the subject of much gossip and rumour. Read More »

RAF Grimsby

RAF Grimsby (Waltham) was opened in 1941 as a satellite for the larger airfield nearby at Binbrook. During it's time as an operational bomber base three squadrons served there; 100 Squadron, 142 Squadron and 550 Squadron. Read More »

RAF Scampton

Nigger

RAF Scampton reopened in 1936 (originally having opened as Home Defence Flight Station Brattleby in 1916, renamed Scampton in 1917 and closed in 1919) and at the outbreak of World War II it was transferred to Bomber Commands No. 5 Group, being the base for 83 Squadron, 49 Squadron, 57 Squadron and 617 Squadron (the Dambusters). Read More »

Scunthorpe General Hospital

Opening on 5 December 1929, Scunthorpe General Hospital was originally named The Scunthorpe and District War Memorial Hospital. Read More »

Sittal Hill, Freiston

Thought to be the site of monks hospital, Spittal Hill can be found at the end of Fox Hole Lane on the A52 and it has a repution of being the haunt of a shag-foal. Read More »

St Mary’s Church, Barnetby-le-Wold

The church of St Mary’s on Church Hill in Barnetby-le-Wold dates from Saxon times though the current building is rebuilt during the Norman era. The church was actually declared redundant and closed in 1972 soo you cannot visit it without making special arrangements. One special item of note regarding St Mary’s was its lead font which dated from the early 12th century. Read More »

St Vincent’s Church, Burton

St Vincents dates back probably to the Norman occupation with a church in Burton being recorded in the Domes Day Book of 1086 and the earliest recorded rector being Richard de Basingham in 1186. Read More »

Sun Inn, Saxilby

The Sun Inn at Saxilby probably dates from around the 18th century and is closely linked with a famous early 19th century murder, that of Mary Kirkham and it said that Tom Otter, the murderer, reputedly haunts the pub to this day. Read More »

The Black Lady of Bradley Woods

Hundreds of years ago there lived a poor woodcutter in Bradley Woods with his pretty young wife and their baby boy. They lived very happily together until the woodcutter was pressed into military service for the local lord.  He was sent to fight in the wars that were then raging in England. Read More »



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