You are hereSomerset

Somerset


Nether Stowey

Nether Stowey has a number of holy wells, and the crossroads at Over Stowey is traditionally haunted by a creature known as the Galley Beggar, who laughs demonically at passers by. A Galley Begger is the local name for a frightening spirit.

Norton Fitzwarren Dragon

Here the Roman general Ostorius was said to have killed hundreds of ancient Britons. Over the centuries a dragon is said to have grown from the corruption of the rotting bodies (this spontaneous growth of creatures from rotting matter was a common belief in Medieval times). Read More »

Paranormal Somerset by Sonia Smith

Paranormal Somerset

Everyone loves a good ghost story, as a kid it's what got me interested in the paranormal and it's what will hopefully get the next generation interested in finding out more. Most ghost books review accounts and experiences but this one takes a story and gives it a fictional twist with characters so that you become involved in the story and identify with the events surrounding them. Read More »

Sedgemoor

Sedgemoor

Like many of the ancient battlefields of Britain, Sedgemoor - the site of the final defeat of the Duke of Monmouth's ill armed rebel army - has gathered many folklore traditions and legends. Read More »

Shervage Wood

Shervage Wood has is home to a number of traditions, perhaps because it was once perceived as being enchanted. In legend and folklore the wood was the home of a dragon known as The Gurt Vurm of Shervage Wood. The dragon was said to have the girth of at least three mature oak trees, and was the bane of the local villages eating cattle and making a general nuisance of itself. Read More »

Shute Shelve Hill

Shute Shelve Hill stands at 764ft overlooking the town of Axbridge. In the 17th century Shute Shelve was used as a site of public execution and is thought to be haunted a woman and two men that were hanged there for the murder of the womans husband.

Taunton Castle

Many places in Somerset have traditions and legends relating back to the Monmouth Rebellion of 1685, locally known as the 'Duking Days'. Many Somerset people were to suffer at the hands of the authorities after the failed uprising, and Taunton Castle was the scene for some of the trails of the Bloody Assizes, when hundreds of people were sent to the Gallows by Judge Jeffries. Read More »

The Chalice Well, Glastonbury

Chalice Well

The Chalice Well has been associated with healing and with the Holy Grail for many years. According to legend Joseph of Arimethea placed the cup that held the blood of Christ into the well. The waters run red with Iron Oxide another association with blood. Read More »

The George and Pilgrim Hotel, Glastonbury

Known as the George before the 20th century, The George and Pilgrim dates from the 1430's* and was originally owned by the Abbots of Glastonbury Abbey until its dissolution in September 1539. Read More »

Wassailing The Apple Trees - Carhampton

Wassail originates from the Old English "waes hael", meaning "be well".  It is a mulled cider or ale seasoned with honey and spices.  Wassailing the apple trees is a traditional way of blessing th etrees to ensure a good harvest.  Villagers would gather around the apple trees making a racket to awaken the tree spirits and scare away any lingering deamons.  The strongest tre Read More »

Wievliscombe

The red sandstone Church of St Andrew in Wievliscombe was designed by Richard Carver and built between 1827-1829. It has a font and a sandstone cross which date to the 14th century, but interestingly it also has a devil legend associated with it. When the church was being built, the devil appeared riding a green dragon and started to hurl rocks at the church. Read More »

Wookey Hole

Wookey Hole is famed for "The Witch of Wookey" a giant stalagmite, which resembles a witches face in profile. Folklore tells that the stalagmite was once a witch who terrorised the local area, and was petrified by the intervention of a Glastonbury monk. Read More »

Craig-y-Nos Castle


Rooms from £55.00 per night midweek with continental breakfastRooms from £55.00 per night midweek with continental breakfast



Share/Save

Navigation

Recent comments

Featured Site