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A64 between York and Norton

Traditionally haunted by the spirit of Nance, who is said to guide travellers when there are dense mists. The story goes that she was due to marry a mail-coach driver but fell for the charms of a highwayman. He turned out to be a bad choice, as he left her and their baby to die of exposure on the lonely road. Read More »

A640 Buckstones Ghost

The following article by Phil Clay entitled ‘The Buckstones Ghost’ appeared in the Saddleworth White Rose Society (in the county of York) Newsletter (2000) and details his experience with an apparition whilst serving as a Police Officer in Saddleworth whilst it was part of West Yorkshire. Read More »

Acaster Malbis

During the medieval period in Britain the Jewish people were heavily persecuted, one of the heavy persecutions was carried out in York. A group of Jewish people fled to Acaster Mathis, and used the parish church for meeting. Some local villagers managed to trap the group inside and then set fire to the building - killing all those who were trapped inside. Read More »

All Saints Church, Nunnington and the Dragon of Loschy Wood

The following account of the legend of the Dragon of Loschy Hill was detailed in the 1888 book ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ by Rev Thomas Parkinson who quoted his source as being an article entitled Serpent Legends of Yorkshire from the Leisure Hour (May 1878). Read More »

Auld 'Opper Of Raydale House

Raydale House is a 17th century building that has been largely rebuilt during the 19th century and, it was during the 19th century that it acquired a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

Bagdale Hall

Bagdale Hall

The hall is the oldest building in Whitby built in 1516. It is now a hotel said to be haunted by Browne Bushell, a former owner who was executed for piracy. He has been seen walking up the staircase, and has also been heard in the same place.

There has been other strange phenomena associated with the hall over the years, including poltergeist activity.

Bainbridge

Associated with a 700 year old tradition of horn blowing. The horn was sounded every night during the autumn and winter months. It was once a guide to travellers, who may have become lost in the great forests that surrounded the area.

Directions: Off the A684 to the East of Hawes. Or just listen for the horn.

Beauty for Discount Store, Kirkgate (1977)

Mike Hallowell recounted the following story of a Leeds ghost in his article entitled ‘The strange case of the cellar dweller’ which was published in the Shields Gazette on Wednesday 10 October 2007. Read More »

Bolling Hall Museum

Now a museum, Bolling Hall, parts of which which date from the 14th century, is one of Bradford’s oldest buildings. It would also appear to have a reputation for being haunted and has a famous legend relating to a white lady in what is known as the Ghost Room. Read More »

Brimham Rocks

The rocks are associated with a wealth of folklore, and were perhaps a place of ancient worship. They were once thought to have been carved by the druids, although their strange weathering is entirely natural. One stone is called the wishing stone, it has a hole into which you would place the fingers of your right hand and then make a wish. Read More »

Burning of the Bartle, West Witton

Famous for the Burning of the Bartle festival, when an effigy of St Bartholomew is burned in the town. The festival takes place on the nearest Saturday to the 24th of August. Read More »

Byland Abbey

William of Newburgh's Chronicle of 1290AD is said to mention the sighting of a round silvery object flying over the Byland Abbey in Yorkshire. Read More »

Calverley Old Hall

Now a holiday let, parts of this Grade I listed building date from the 15th Century and it was the home of the Calverley Family. Read More »

Cathedral Church of St Peter, York Minster

The largest gothic cathedral in northern Europe, York Minster dates from between 1220 and 1472. It is built upon the site of York's Roman Basilica and subsequently the location chosen for an early Christian Church (627AD – 640AD). Read More »

Cawood Castle

Cawood Castle was a palace of the Archbishop of York probably built upon an early Saxon fortification dating from the reign of King Athelstan (Æthelstan) 925AD - 939AD. During the English Civil War (1642–1651) Cawood was fought over several times and served as a prisoner of war camp. Read More »

Church of St Mary and St Alkelda

Church Of St Mary & St Alkelda

Dating from 1280, this is one of only two churches dedicated to St Alkeda (Alkelda,Athilda, Alcelda) (the other being in Giggleswick) and is said to be her final resting place. St Alkeda was a chaste Saxon maiden, sometimes described as a princess and a nun. Read More »

Dean Court Hotel, York

Built by the architects J.B. & W. Atkinson in 1865, the Dean Court Hotel was originally three separate houses for Clergy from the nearby York Minster. Read More »

Dobb Park Lodge

The following story is taken from ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions’ of Great Britain by John Ingram (1897. 'On the southern slope of a picturesque valley, through which the Washburn pours its waters, stands the ruins of Dobb Park Lodge; a lofty, four-storied mansion of the Tudor period. Read More »

Dracula's Whitby by Ian Thompson

Dracula's Whitby

Sharpen your fangs and prepare to bite into this this new book focussing on the Whitby that Bram Stoker would have been more than familiar with. In this new book by author Ian Thompson, and published by Amberley Press, we are invited along on an exploration of old Whitby town and discover for ourselves the places and locations that Stoker, and indeed his Dracula, frequented. Read More »

Druids Temple, Ilton

Druids Temple

The Druids Temple, situated near Ilton, about 4 miles west of Masham is a folly created by William Danby of nearby Swinton Hall in 1820. The structure sits deep within a private forest and includes a large stone table, a sheltered cave and an altar stone. The temple is approximately 100 feet long and 50 feet wide, with some of the stones standing over 10 feet high. Read More »

Filey Brigg

Filey Brigg is a long ridge of rocks jutting into the North Sea, associated with folklore concerning the Devil and a dragon. Read More »

Fountains Abbey

The abbey was founded in 1132 by the Benedictines, but was destroyed 30 years later, and then reconstructed. The abbey became one of the wealthiest in Britain due to the booming medieval wool trade. Its wealth was also to be its downfall, and it was one of the first abbeys to be crushed under the dissolution of the monasteries in 1540. Read More »

Giggleswick

The ebbing and flowing well: legend tells how a nymph was being chased by a satyr who was overcome with lust. The nymph prayed to the gods and was saved by being turned into a well - famous for healing. The only thing that remained of the nymph was her eternal breath that causes the well to ebb and flow like the tides. Read More »

Gormire Lake & White Mare Crag

Surrounded by the dense Garbutt Wood, Gormire Lake is the result of glacial activity and is one of the few natural lakes in Yorkshire. Gormire Lake has a few little known gems of folklore attached it. One tale involves a witch who was being chased across the moor. Read More »

Grassington Bargest

The following story was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ by Edwin Sidney Hartland [1890], under the title ‘Billy B---‘s Adventure’ and Robert Hunt’s 'Popular Romances of the West of England' was cited. Read More »

Craig-y-Nos Castle


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