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Fountains Abbey

The abbey was founded in 1132 by the Benedictines, but was destroyed 30 years later, and then reconstructed. The abbey became one of the wealthiest in Britain due to the booming medieval wool trade. Its wealth was also to be its downfall, and it was one of the first abbeys to be crushed under the dissolution of the monasteries in 1540. Read More »

Giggleswick

The ebbing and flowing well: legend tells how a nymph was being chased by a satyr who was overcome with lust. The nymph prayed to the gods and was saved by being turned into a well - famous for healing. The only thing that remained of the nymph was her eternal breath that causes the well to ebb and flow like the tides. Read More »

Gormire Lake & White Mare Crag

Surrounded by the dense Garbutt Wood, Gormire Lake is the result of glacial activity and is one of the few natural lakes in Yorkshire. Gormire Lake has a few little known gems of folklore attached it. One tale involves a witch who was being chased across the moor. Read More »

Grassington Bargest

The following story was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ by Edwin Sidney Hartland [1890], under the title ‘Billy B---‘s Adventure’ and Robert Hunt’s 'Popular Romances of the West of England' was cited. Read More »

Hairy Bob's Cave

Hairy Bob's Cave

On the seafront at the foot of the cliffs around Scarborough Castle, a hole in the cliff, about a metre deep can be found - this is known as Hairy Bob's Cave. It is clearly man-made and little more than a hole in the rock but, the origins and reasons behind its existence have been the source of legend and folklore in the town for over a century. Read More »

Haunted Huddersfield by Kai Roberts

Haunted Huddersfield

Growing up around the Lancashire/Yorkshire border I was never too far away from Huddersfield and the Holme Valley so I was particularly keen to read this book in the Haunted series, on Huddersfield and the local area. Read More »

Headless Woman of Dalton

The following account appeared in ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders’ by William Henderson (1879) “At Dalton, near Thirsk,” writes Mr. Baring-Gould, “is an old barn, which is haunted by a headless woman. One night a tramp went into it to sleep. Read More »

Heath Old Hall

Heath Old Hall was demolished in 1961 and I beleive the site has been built upon. It was reputedly haunted by a Blue Lady, Dame Mary Bolles (Wytham), of Osberton, 1st Baronetess (1579 - 1662), daughter of William Witham of Ledstone Hall who is buried in the Parish Church of Ledsham. Read More »

HM Prison Leeds, Armley

HM Prison Leeds, also known as Armley Gaol, is a Category B men's prison dating from 1847. It was also a site of execution, with its last hanging taking place on 29 June 1961. Read More »

Hob Hole, Runswick Bay

The haunt of a goblin, Hob, which is a generic term for a brownie of boggle in Yorkshire. This hob was unusual in that the was thought to be able to cure whooping cough, and parents would bring their afflicted child to the cave and recite a rhyme in the hope of a cure.

Directions: Runswick Bay reached via a minor road off the A174 to the Northwest of Whitby.

Holy Trinity Church, Coverham

Coverham Church

This church dates from the 13th century. Read More »

Holy Trinity Church, York

Although much of the exterior dates from the 17th and 18th centuries, Holy Trinity Church sits on a site that has been used for a church since the Doomsday Book. Holy Trinty itself dates from between the 13th and 15th century, boasting some fine examples of medieval stained glass. It is supposed to be haunted by a phantom nun, and two other ghosts.

Ilkley Moor UFO Abduction (1987)

On 1st December 1987 a former Police Officer, who has not been named, set off from his home early in the morning to visit a relative who lived in nearby East Morton. He decided to travel over Ilkley Moor and took with him a camera. Read More »

Ivelet Bridge Black Dog

The single span Ivelet Bridge over the River Swale dates from 1687 and was an important crossing point on the 16 mile Corpse Way from Muker to the Churchyard at Grinton, which was once the only consecrated burial ground in the dale. Read More »

Kettleness Black Dog

A phantom Black Dog is said to haunt Kettleness near Whitby. In Marc Alexander’s ‘To Anger the Devil’ which is a biography of the exorcist Reverend Dr Donald Omand, he describes how in the 1950s Rev Omand received letter from a schoolmaster detailing his experience with the dog and requesting an exorcism. Read More »

Kilburn White Horse

The Kilburn White Horse was finished on 4th November 1857 and is believed to be the most northern and possibly the largest White Horse in Britain, being 318’ long and 220’ high (though it was designed to be 314’ long and 228’ high). It faces south-south-west and is situated near Roulston Scar, to the south of Sutton Bank. Read More »

Kilgram Bridge

The site of Kilgram Bridge has been used for thousands of years to cross the River Ure. This Norman bridge prossibly dates from 1145AD (certainly standing by 1301 AD) and was built by the monks from the Cistercian Jervaulx Abbey. It was built upon the remains of an early Roman paved ford, the well preserved remains of which were used as the bridge's foundations. Read More »

Kirkstall Abbey

The following tunnel legend was published in Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson (1879). ’A…..tale is told of Kirkstall Abbey, near Leeds. Read More »

Knaresborough

Knaresborough is most famous for its connections with the prophetess Mother Shipton. She is said to have been born in a cave now known as Mother Shipton's cave, now a popular tourist attraction. Read More »

Leeds Town Hall

Leeds Town Hall

Beneath the front steps of Leeds Town Hall is the old Central Charge Office or Bridewell (a general term for a small prison), the reputed haunt of the ghost of the notorious burglar and murderer Charles Peace. Read More »

Maiden’s Castle, Reeth

The following treasure legend was published in Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson (1879). ‘I learn from Mr. Robinson, of Hill House, Reeth, Yorkshire, that in his neighbourhood as in many others is a place called Maiden’s Castle, in which tradition avers a chest of gold is buried. Read More »

Malt Shovel Public House, Oswaldkirk

The Malt Shovel is a Grade II listed building and according Sir Nikolaus Pevsner (born 30 January 1902 – died 18 August 1983) dates from around 1720. Originally built as a house by William Moore, the Malt Shovel has a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

Marks & Spencer, York

An article by Joanna Moorhead in The Guardian on 26 October 2011 tells us that 'Over at Coppergate Shopping Centre, site of a Viking fort, it seems an archaeological dig has disturbed spirits that had been lying dormant for centuries. Read More »

Marston Moor

On a minor road between the A59 and the B1224, a major battle of the civil war was fought on the 2nd July 1644. In 1968 some tourist were lost on the road when they came across a group of men dressed as 17th century soldiers. They thought that they were people in fancy dress, although the men looked worn out. They later discovered that they had been on the road through the battle site. Read More »

Middleham Castle

Middleham Castle

The castle is reputed to be the site of a buried hoard of treasure, to find it you must run a round the castle three times, and where you stop the treasure will be found. Unfortunately there is no indication of where you should start.

Directions: Off the A6108 to the South of Leyburn.

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