You are hereFestivals

Festivals


Plague Sunday

Cucklet Church

Last Sunday in August - A service is held in Cucklet Cleft (Cucklet Church), a natural cavern destroyed by glacier ice near Eyam, Derbyshire. The service commemorates the bravery of the Eyam villagers and William Mompesson, for closing Eyam village after it became infested with the plague in 1665. Read More »

Plough Monday

This takes place on the Monday following twelfth night. Ploughs were traditionally blessed in churches at this time, to ready them for the coming of spring.

Quarr Abbey

The abbey is said to be haunted by Eleanor of Aquataine - Henry II's queen, who was exiled here before her death in France in 1204.

Monks also celebrated a feast of fools here on New Years Day; the festival was thought to be christianised version of the Roman festivals Saturnalia, and Bachanalia.

Riding The Black Lad (Black Knight Pageant), Ashton-under-Lyne

In 1911, the following description of this ancient Ashton custom appeared in A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 4. Read More »

Rochdale Rush-Bearing

Rochdale Rushcart

As far as I am aware Rochdale no longer celebrates the Rush Bearing festival, though nearby Littleborough revived theirs in 1991 and continue to celebrate it each year. Below is description of how Rochdale and its Rush-Bearing from Lancashire Legends (1873) by John Harland & T T Wilkinson. Read More »

Rogation Day

23 May - Rogation Day is a rare festival from the Christian calender.  Rogation Day is one of the three days prior to Ascension Day and would see processions going around parish boundaries blessing their crops.  This was known as 'beating the bounds'.

Saddleworth Rushcart

Uppermill Rushcart 1880

Rushbearing dates back to the middle ages and is a festival where rushes were collected to be strewn out over the floors of churches, back when the floors were just earthen. The tradition died off when church floors started to be flagged by the 19th century, though in some villages and towns it was revived as a folk custom. Read More »

Scarborough

Scarborugh Castle

Scarborough also has a Robin Hood legend. On one of his adventures he joined the small fishing fleet, but turned out to be a useless fisherman, as he forgot to bait the hooks. Read More »

Sheellah's Day

March 18 - Sheellah's Day is an Irish festival in honour of Sheelah-na-gig.

Souls Day

2 November - All Souls Day is related to Samhain and commemorating the dead.

St Andrews Day

30 November - St Andrews Day, patron Saint of Scotland.

St Bridget or Brigit's Day

1 February - St Brigit is a Christianised version of Brighid or Bride, a goddess associated with the beginning of spring, once widely venerated in by the Celts.

St Clement's Day

23 November - The Patron Saint of Iron workers, it is possibly an earlier festival date of Wayland or another smith god.

St Davids Day

March 1 - This is St Davids Day, the patron Saint of Wales who died on this date 598AD.

St George's Day

St George

Today St George’s Day is not celebrated in England with anywhere near the vigour it was in past centuries, and is actually celebrated more in other countries that share his patronage, with traditions that have not been broken for hundreds of years. Read More »

St Lewina

St Lewina was a young British virgin who was martyred by Saxons on 24 July 687AD (whilst Theodore was 7th Archbishop of Canterbury). Following her death she was buried at Seaford, near Lewes in East Sussex. Read More »

St Lucy's Day

13 December - Traditionally a day for divining the identity of future husbands.

St Mark's Eve

24 April - The feast day of St Mark the Evangelist (founder of the Church of Alexandria) falls on 25th April, but there are some interesting folk customs that fall on the eve of the feast.

Divining Who Is To Die Read More »

St Mullins Monastery and Holy Well

Originally known as Rinn Ros Broic (Badgers Wood Point), Kennedy’s Field and Achadh-Cainidh, St Mullins is the site where St Moling built his monastery during the 7th Century. Read More »

St Swithin's day

15 July - The Bishop of Winchester or St Swithin died in AD 862. In legend the monks could not remove his body for 40 days and 40 nights because of torrential rain. It has now become folklore that if it rains on St Swithins day, it will rain for 40 days and 40 nights.

St Valentines Day

14 February - An ancient festival dedicated later to St Valentine. It is associated with love and marriage. In the past some of its customs involved looking into the future to try and reveal the identity of future partners.

Strange Mitcham by James Clark

Strange Mitcham

Strange Mitcham by James Clark was first published as a booklet in 2002 as part of ASSAP's (Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) Project Albion. It was updated and republished in 2011 giving James the opportunity to add a few more articles and further information. Read More »

Strange Project Albion

Project Albion is part of one of ASSAP’s longest running and most successful research endeavours and it has been likened to a Domesday book of the paranormal. It is an attempt to record the full spectrum of anomalies, past and present, within their geographical, as well as historical, context. Read More »

Summer Solstice

21 June - Summer Solstice is the longest day in the year.

The Ashton Gyst-Ale

The gyst-ale, or guising feast, was an annual festival of the town of Ashton-under-Lyne. It appears from the rental of Sir John de Assheton, compiled a.d. 1422, that a sum of twenty shillings was paid to him as lord of the manor for the privilege of holding this feast by its then conductors. Read More »

Craig-y-Nos Castle


Rooms from £55.00 per night midweek with continental breakfastRooms from £55.00 per night midweek with continental breakfast



Share/Save

Navigation

Recent comments

Featured Site