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August


Burning of the Bartle, West Witton

Famous for the Burning of the Bartle festival, when an effigy of St Bartholomew is burned in the town. The festival takes place on the nearest Saturday to the 24th of August. Read More »

The Festival of the Torches

15th August - In Roman times this was Diana's chief festival, when lighted torches were placed in her sacred groves. Her other sacred day was the 'Feast of our Lady Queen of Heaven' on the 31st of May. Read More »

Lammas / Lugnasadh

1 August - Celtic festival of Lugh, the god of light. Celebration of the early harvest, when loaves were baked and sometimes distributed from churches. Lammas is derived from Loaf Mass.

Marymass

3rd or 4th Monday in August - Once said to have been celebrated with hilltop fires, the festival is now associated with Mary Queen of Scots. A Queen is voted from the local Irvine girls and a parade goes through the town along with other events.

Plague Sunday

Cucklet Church

Last Sunday in August - A service is held in Cucklet Cleft (Cucklet Church), a natural cavern destroyed by glacier ice near Eyam, Derbyshire. The service commemorates the bravery of the Eyam villagers and William Mompesson, for closing Eyam village after it became infested with the plague in 1665. Read More »

Rochdale Rush-Bearing

Rochdale Rushcart

As far as I am aware Rochdale no longer celebrates the Rush Bearing festival, though nearby Littleborough revived theirs in 1991 and continue to celebrate it each year. Below is description of how Rochdale and its Rush-Bearing from Lancashire Legends (1873) by John Harland & T T Wilkinson. Read More »

Saddleworth Rushcart

Uppermill Rushcart 1880

Rushbearing dates back to the middle ages and is a festival where rushes were collected to be strewn out over the floors of churches, back when the floors were just earthen. The tradition died off when church floors started to be flagged by the 19th century, though in some villages and towns it was revived as a folk custom. Read More »

The Burryman

14 August - On the second Friday of August, a man completely covered in Burdock burs (known as the Burryman) walks the boundaries of South Queensferry, a distance of seven miles. The ritual probably has pagan origins.



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