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St Nidan's Old Church and The Thigh Stone

St Nidan’s Church in Llanidan is associated with a stone that had strange magical like properties including aiding fertilisation and having the power to move on its own.  Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins (1881) mentions that ‘The old British historian Nennius speaks of a stone, one of the wonders of the Isle Read More »

St Oswald's Church, Winwick

St Oswald, King of Northumbria (Born 604 – Died 5 August 642) was killed during the Battle of Maserfield (Maserfelth) against the pagan Mercian King Penda (Died 15 November 655). Read More »

St Patrick’s Chair and Well

St Patrick’s Chair and Well (also known as the Druids Chair and Well or St Brigid’s Well or St Brigit’s Well) lies within Altadeven Wood, not far from the Ulster Way footpath. The chair is a huge 2m high stone block, shaped like a throne. Read More »

St Peter's Church, Stanion

A two meter long whale bone inside this 13th century church has been linked to a legend of a huge cow that was big enough to feed the whole village in times of need. Read More »

St Peters, Llanbedr

Llanbedr Stone

St Peters Church in Llanbedr is where you can find, behind the rear pew, an ancient engraved stone that stands two foot nine inches in height and two foot wide. The engraving is that of a seven turn spiral measuring twelve inches in diameter. It is said to be similar to those associated with the Irish Boyne culture. Read More »

The Buggane of St Trinians

St Trinians 1910

St Trinian's church is the ruined shell of a 14th Century building standing at the foot of Mount Greeba on the Isle of Man. The chapel was the haunt of a Buggane: a fearsome creature of Manx folklore that appears in a number of folktales from the island. Read More »

St Tysilio's Church, Llandysilo

The Gothic St Tysilio's in Llandysilo dates from 1867 but is built on the foundations of a much earlier church. Thought to be founded by St Tysilio early in the 7th century there are records of a chapel here dating back as early as 1254 and 1291. It was probably this earlier building that was reputedly haunted by a spirit which was according to folklore exorcised. Read More »

St Vincent’s Church, Burton

St Vincents dates back probably to the Norman occupation with a church in Burton being recorded in the Domes Day Book of 1086 and the earliest recorded rector being Richard de Basingham in 1186. Read More »

St. Llechid's Church, Llanllechid

The Church of St Llechid is a Grade II listed building. Built to replace a much earlier 15th century church, the building dates from 1844. There is a siting legend relating the building of original St. Read More »

St. Tydecho Stone

In the village of Llanymawddwy, there is an ancient church dedicated to St. Tydecho, thought to be the son of Anna Pendragon, King Arthur’s sister. Wirt Sykes in British Goblins (1881) gives the following tale of St. Tydecho and a blue stone. ‘There was a stone in the valley of Mowddwy, which did good service for the church. A certain St. Read More »

Stiperstones

Striper Tones

As with many tales regarding in Britain about the Devil, this one also has him carrying an apron full of stones, in this case from Ireland. He sat to rest upon what is now called The Devil's Chair and is the highest rock on this ridge. As usual, the apron strings break and he drops his load of stones. Read More »

Stokesley

The Wise man of a stokesley a man called Wrightson is reputed to have been a great seer and healer. The 7th son of a 7th daughter he was especially famed for healing cattle and his far sight. He died in the 1900s. Many villages had such wise men and women famed for their powers.

Stonehenge

Sunset at Stonehenge

Stonehenge is probably the most recognisable and enigmatic stone circle in Britain. The structure has fascinated people for centuries, and there are many theories as to what purpose it was put to by ancient man. Stonehenge has suffered over the years from trophy hunters, and the wear and tear of many visitors. Read More »

Strange Lands By Andrew L Paciorek

Strange Lands

Andy Paciorek is one of Mysterious Britain & Irelands favourite contributors and his amazing artwork can be found illustrating articles throughout this site. Read More »

Strange Mitcham by James Clark

Strange Mitcham

Strange Mitcham by James Clark was first published as a booklet in 2002 as part of ASSAP's (Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) Project Albion. It was updated and republished in 2011 giving James the opportunity to add a few more articles and further information. Read More »

Strange Project Albion

Project Albion is part of one of ASSAP’s longest running and most successful research endeavours and it has been likened to a Domesday book of the paranormal. It is an attempt to record the full spectrum of anomalies, past and present, within their geographical, as well as historical, context. Read More »

Strata Florida Abbey

The abbey was founded in early part of the 13th century by the Cistercian monks, and was one of the grandest in Wales at its height. It was seen as a centre of education and political activity. The abbey was destroyed during the reformation. Read More »

Stretford Great Stone

By the entrance of Gorse Hill Park from Chester Road is a large boulder known as the Great Stone. This stone gave its name to Great Stone Road (beside which it stood until 1925) and the old Great Stone Farm. There are many stories, legends and theories concerning the origins of the stone. Read More »

Swearing on the Horns

Swearing on the Horns

Between the 17th and 19th centuries there was a folk custom in the Public Houses and Inns of Highgate known as the ‘Swearing on the Horns’. Read More »

Taliesin the Bard

Taliesin

This is the version translated by Lady Charlotte Guest, and published in 1849 in the collection of old Welsh tales entitled the Mabinogion. Traditionally Taliesin is placed in the time of Arthur, which is generally believed to be in the 6th century AD. Read More »

Tamlin of Carterhaugh Wood

Carterhaugh Wood is the setting for the tale of Tamlin (Tam Lin, Tamas Lin, Tamlane, Tam Lane or Tam Lien) who was in bondage to the Fairy Queen and guardian of the wood. Maidens were warned by their King not to enter Carterhaugh Wood as Tamlin would take either one of their possessions (a ring or green mantle) or their virginity. Read More »

Tarbh Uisge

The Tarbh Uisge or Water Bull is a creature of Scottish folklore similar to the Each Uisge (Water Horse). Some sources claim they could only be found in isolated pools in the highlands, while others suggest they frequented the coastal regions of Scotland. Read More »

Tarroo-Ushtey Of Onchan

In The Folk-lore Of The Isle Of Man (1891), Arthur William Moore gives the following account of a chance encounter with a Tarroo-Ushtey or Water Bull (the Scottish name for these creatures is Tarbh Uisge). Read More »

The Aberystwyth Mermaid

The story of the Aberystwyth Mermaid was published after 1826, written in Welsh. The general abbreviated story is outlined below. Read More »

The Abuela's Skeleton

A poor family once lived close to Lago de Patzcuaro, farming beans, corn and squash. There was a wife, her husband, her mother and her small son. The boy was especially fond of his grandmother (abuela) and he was the apple of her eye. They would often pick wildflowers together or go down to the lake shore and watch the boats on the water. Read More »



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