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Snarly Yow

"Snarly Yow" is the name given to a phantom hound which haunted a section of the National Pike near Turner's Gap (Frederick County). The hound was first mentioned by Madeleine V. Dahlgren in 1882. Her book South Mountain Magic details no less than a dozen sightings of the beast. One account is from a Daniel Mesick, whose father kicked at a huge dog near Dame's Quarter. Read More »


Snowdon 1

Standing 3650 ft above sea level, Snowdon is the highest peak in Wales, second highest mountain in Britain and is also probably the busiest due to it popularity with hillwalkers. Read More »

Song, at the Feast of Brougham Castle by William Wordsworth

High in the breathless Hall the Minstrel sate.
And Emont's murmur mingled with the Song.--
The words of ancient time I thus translate,
A festal Strain that hath been silent long.
From Town to Town, from Tower to Tower,
The Red Rose is a gladsome Flower.
Her thirty years of Winter past;
The Red Rose is revived at last; Read More »

Southend-on-Sea Ratman

I thought I'd tell you of a local legend in Southend-on-Sea that I heard growing up and thought you'd enjoy. In our town, there is a pretty grim underpass that's been there for years, and has developed a reputation for being crime-ridden and basically a no-go-area after dark. However, more interesting is the ghost said to haunt it. Read More »

Southport Phantom Voice

John Roby recounted the following story entitled ‘The Phantom Voice’ in his ‘Traditions of Lancashire’ (1872) Read More »

Spirit of Llyn-Nad-y-Forwyn

The following folk tale of a haunting beside the River Colwyn in Beddgelert was taken from Elias Owen's Welsh Folk-Lore (1896). 'It is said that a young man was about to marry a young girl, and on the evening before the wedding they were rambling along the water's side together, but the man was false, and loved another better than the woman whom he was about to wed. Read More »

The Spriggans

Armed Spriggan

Spriggans is the name given to a family of fairies in Cornish folklore, they are the closely related to the Piskies, but were generally believed to be darker and more dangerous than their mischievous cousins. Whereas Piskies are generally described as being cheerful and fun loving, Spriggans are more spiteful and full of malice, directed at humans in the form of evil tricks. Read More »

Spring Heeled Jack – The Terror of the Black Country

Out of the dark, supernatural depths of Victorian England one name stands out. Jack.

Not Jack the Ripper, but a more supernatural fiend - Spring Heeled Jack! Read More »

St Andrew's Parish Church, Alfriston

St Andrew’s Parish Church is a Grade I listed building dating back to 1370. It was built in a cruciform shape and is referred to as The Cathedral of the Downs. There is a siting legend attached to St Andrews Church dating back to its original construction. Read More »

St Augustines Well, Cerne Abbas

St Augustines Well, Cerne Abbas

All the following details were made available on the information board inside the burial ground situated above St Augustine's Well; Read More »

St Bartholomew's Church, Fingest

St Bartholomews Church is a Grade I listed building and dates back to the 12th century. There is a folk good luck custom associated with weddings at St Batholomews, where the groom is expected to lift his bride over the church gate after the ceremony. To ensure this is done the church gate is usually kept locked on such occasions. Read More »

St Catherine's Church, Barmby Moor

Dating from around 1272, St Catherine's Parish Church was largely rebuilt in 1850 replacing much of the original Norman building. In the churchyard, just south of the main door is a stone which has been speculated may have been a place of pagan worship. Read More »

St Chad's Church, Saddleworth

St Chad's Church

Saddleworth church - dedicated to St Chad - has a legend associated with its location. It is said that the original site for the church was on nearby Brown Hill, but every night the stones were mysteriously moved to their present position. Eventually the builders gave up moving the stones back to Brown Hill, and built it where the stones were placed each night. Read More »

St Cynfarch and St Mary Church, Llanfair Dyffryn Clwyd

According to Elias Owen in his 'Welsh folk-lore: a collection of the folk-tales and legends of North Wales' (1887) 'For the following legend, I am indebted to Mr. R. Prys Jones, who resided for several years in the parish of Llanfair Dyffryn Clwyd. In answer to a letter from me respecting mysterious removal of churches, Mr. Read More »

St Digain's Church, Llangernyw

St Digain's Church in Llangerny has a unique living ancient monument, a male yew tree that is possibly aged 4000 to 5000 years making it one of the oldest living organisms in the world. There is also a tradition associated with the church and All Hallows Eve when a spirit would reputedly announce the names of those about to die from the altar. Read More »

St Ethelbert’s Holy Well

Around 794AD, King Offa of Mercia demanded the head of the Christian King Ethelbert of East Anglia whilst he was making arrangements to marry Offa's daughter. Not far from the location of Marden Church the young king was assassinated and his body hidden. After rumours of Ethelbert's ghost being seen in the marden area, Offa asked the Pope for absolution. Read More »

St Fillan's Chair and Well Dunfillan

A rocky seat on top of the Dunfillan, is the place where St Fillan is said to have sat and blessed the surrounding lands. The chair was thought to be able to heal rheumatism of the back, although you had to be dragged back down the hill by your legs to affect a cure. This would certainly cause enough bruising to allow you to forget about your rheumatism for a while. Read More »

St Giles' Church In Wales, Wrexham

One of the Seven Wonders of Wales, St Giles’ Church dates from the 16th century and has an interesting piece of folklore attached to it. Alfred. Read More »

St Govan's Chapel

This tiny chapel hidden in a deep ravine in the rocks dates from the thirteenth century. There may have been a chapel or religious structure here in the fifth century making it one of the earliest places of Christian worship. It has been suggested that the chapel was part of a larger Hermitage but its history is unclear. Read More »

St Gwynog’s Church, Aberhafesp

St Gwynog’s Church in Aberhafesp currently dates from 1857 when the earlier church was rebuilt. Though the first parish registers date from 1578, there are records of a church here in Aberhafesp dating back to 1254. The church is dedicated to the 6th century Gwynog (Born 511 – Died 580), the son of Gildas. Read More »

St Levan's Church

It is said that the sound of a bell issues from a particular grave in the churchyard, when someone who is destined to die soon passes over it.

The church yard also contains a stone said to have been split open by St Levan. According to tradition if the gap becomes wide enough for a horse and cart to pass through it, it will signal the end of the world. Read More »

St Margaret's Church, Hornby

The Grade I listed St Margaret's Church in Hornby was founded by Sir Edward Stanley, Lord Mounteagle, in 1514, the tower of which still stands. (An earlier church had been on the site dating from around 1338). Read More »

St Mary's Bleeding Gravestone

St Mary’s Church is the last resting place of Richard Smith who was killed on 12th April 1727, aged 20 years old. A recruiting sergeant for the army had come to Hinckley and was informing a crowd of potential new soldiers about the virtues of taking the King’s shilling, when Richard started barracking him, making jokes and quips. Read More »

St Mary’s Church, Barnetby-le-Wold

The church of St Mary’s on Church Hill in Barnetby-le-Wold dates from Saxon times though the current building is rebuilt during the Norman era. The church was actually declared redundant and closed in 1972 soo you cannot visit it without making special arrangements. One special item of note regarding St Mary’s was its lead font which dated from the early 12th century. Read More »

St Mary’s Loch

James Hogg (born 1770 – died 21 November 1835) ‘The Ettrick Shepherd’ wrote the following concerning a water cow that was said to have lived in the 5 km long St Mary’s Loch, which is the largest natural loch in the Borders. Read More »



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