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St Levan's Church

It is said that the sound of a bell issues from a particular grave in the churchyard, when someone who is destined to die soon passes over it.

The church yard also contains a stone said to have been split open by St Levan. According to tradition if the gap becomes wide enough for a horse and cart to pass through it, it will signal the end of the world. Read More »

St Margaret's Church, Hornby

The Grade I listed St Margaret's Church in Hornby was founded by Sir Edward Stanley, Lord Mounteagle, in 1514, the tower of which still stands. (An earlier church had been on the site dating from around 1338). Read More »

St Mary's Bleeding Gravestone

St Mary’s Church is the last resting place of Richard Smith who was killed on 12th April 1727, aged 20 years old. A recruiting sergeant for the army had come to Hinckley and was informing a crowd of potential new soldiers about the virtues of taking the King’s shilling, when Richard started barracking him, making jokes and quips. Read More »

St Mary’s Church, Barnetby-le-Wold

The church of St Mary’s on Church Hill in Barnetby-le-Wold dates from Saxon times though the current building is rebuilt during the Norman era. The church was actually declared redundant and closed in 1972 soo you cannot visit it without making special arrangements. One special item of note regarding St Mary’s was its lead font which dated from the early 12th century. Read More »

St Mary’s Loch

James Hogg (born 1770 – died 21 November 1835) ‘The Ettrick Shepherd’ wrote the following concerning a water cow that was said to have lived in the 5 km long St Mary’s Loch, which is the largest natural loch in the Borders. Read More »

St Michaels Parish Church, Ashton-under-Lyne

St Michaels Parish Church is thought to have been founded by Sir John Assheton (died 1428), Member of Parliament and soldier. Read More »

St Moluag's Church

St Moluag's Church Interior

This small and ancient church has a plethora of legends and traditions associated with it, making it one of the most important mysterious sites on the Isle of Lewis. Read More »

St Mullins Monastery and Holy Well

Originally known as Rinn Ros Broic (Badgers Wood Point), Kennedy’s Field and Achadh-Cainidh, St Mullins is the site where St Moling built his monastery during the 7th Century. Read More »

St Nidan's Old Church and The Thigh Stone

St Nidan’s Church in Llanidan is associated with a stone that had strange magical like properties including aiding fertilisation and having the power to move on its own.  Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins (1881) mentions that ‘The old British historian Nennius speaks of a stone, one of the wonders of the Isle Read More »

St Oswald's Church, Winwick

St Oswald, King of Northumbria (Born 604 – Died 5 August 642) was killed during the Battle of Maserfield (Maserfelth) against the pagan Mercian King Penda (Died 15 November 655). Read More »

St Patrick’s Chair and Well

St Patrick’s Chair and Well (also known as the Druids Chair and Well or St Brigid’s Well or St Brigit’s Well) lies within Altadeven Wood, not far from the Ulster Way footpath. The chair is a huge 2m high stone block, shaped like a throne. Read More »

St Peter's Church, Stanion

A two meter long whale bone inside this 13th century church has been linked to a legend of a huge cow that was big enough to feed the whole village in times of need. Read More »

St Peters, Llanbedr

Llanbedr Stone

St Peters Church in Llanbedr is where you can find, behind the rear pew, an ancient engraved stone that stands two foot nine inches in height and two foot wide. The engraving is that of a seven turn spiral measuring twelve inches in diameter. It is said to be similar to those associated with the Irish Boyne culture. Read More »

The Buggane of St Trinians

St Trinians 1910

St Trinian's church is the ruined shell of a 14th Century building standing at the foot of Mount Greeba on the Isle of Man. The chapel was the haunt of a Buggane: a fearsome creature of Manx folklore that appears in a number of folktales from the island. Read More »

St Tysilio's Church, Llandysilo

The Gothic St Tysilio's in Llandysilo dates from 1867 but is built on the foundations of a much earlier church. Thought to be founded by St Tysilio early in the 7th century there are records of a chapel here dating back as early as 1254 and 1291. It was probably this earlier building that was reputedly haunted by a spirit which was according to folklore exorcised. Read More »

St Vincent’s Church, Burton

St Vincents dates back probably to the Norman occupation with a church in Burton being recorded in the Domes Day Book of 1086 and the earliest recorded rector being Richard de Basingham in 1186. Read More »

St. Llechid's Church, Llanllechid

The Church of St Llechid is a Grade II listed building. Built to replace a much earlier 15th century church, the building dates from 1844. There is a siting legend relating the building of original St. Read More »

St. Tydecho Stone

In the village of Llanymawddwy, there is an ancient church dedicated to St. Tydecho, thought to be the son of Anna Pendragon, King Arthur’s sister. Wirt Sykes in British Goblins (1881) gives the following tale of St. Tydecho and a blue stone. ‘There was a stone in the valley of Mowddwy, which did good service for the church. A certain St. Read More »

Stiperstones

Striper Tones

As with many tales regarding in Britain about the Devil, this one also has him carrying an apron full of stones, in this case from Ireland. He sat to rest upon what is now called The Devil's Chair and is the highest rock on this ridge. As usual, the apron strings break and he drops his load of stones. Read More »

Stokesley

The Wise man of a stokesley a man called Wrightson is reputed to have been a great seer and healer. The 7th son of a 7th daughter he was especially famed for healing cattle and his far sight. He died in the 1900s. Many villages had such wise men and women famed for their powers.

Stonehenge

Sunset at Stonehenge

Stonehenge is probably the most recognisable and enigmatic stone circle in Britain. The structure has fascinated people for centuries, and there are many theories as to what purpose it was put to by ancient man. Stonehenge has suffered over the years from trophy hunters, and the wear and tear of many visitors. Read More »

Strange Lands By Andrew L Paciorek

Strange Lands

Andy Paciorek is one of Mysterious Britain & Irelands favourite contributors and his amazing artwork can be found illustrating articles throughout this site. Read More »

Strange Mitcham by James Clark

Strange Mitcham

Strange Mitcham by James Clark was first published as a booklet in 2002 as part of ASSAP's (Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) Project Albion. It was updated and republished in 2011 giving James the opportunity to add a few more articles and further information. Read More »

Strange Project Albion

Project Albion is part of one of ASSAP’s longest running and most successful research endeavours and it has been likened to a Domesday book of the paranormal. It is an attempt to record the full spectrum of anomalies, past and present, within their geographical, as well as historical, context. Read More »

Strata Florida Abbey

The abbey was founded in early part of the 13th century by the Cistercian monks, and was one of the grandest in Wales at its height. It was seen as a centre of education and political activity. The abbey was destroyed during the reformation. Read More »



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