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Sedgley’s Beacon Tower

Sedgeley Beacon Tower

Sedgley Beacon lies some 237 metres (777 feet) above sea level in the heart of the West Midlands. It is said that the top of Beacon Hill is the highest point between Sedgley and the Ural Mountains in Russia. Commanding views were once enjoyed right across the industrial Black Country and beyond to the Clee and Malvern hills and the mountains of Wales. Read More »

Segontium Roman Fort

Segontium Roman Fort

This is the remains of a Roman auxiliary fort, one of the largest, and last to be abandoned by the Romans in North Wales. It was built by Gnaeus Julius Agricola in around 77 AD after his victory over the native tribe, the Ordovices. Read More »

Sexhow Ghost

According to ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson’ (1879). ‘Mr. G. M. Tweddell thus relates the history of an apparition which with fitting retributive justice haunted a certain Yorkshire farmer. Read More »

Sheebeg Cairn

Sheebeg Cairn (Sí Beag) is traditionally considered to be the burial site of Gráinne, (daughter of Cormac mac Airt, High King of Ireland ) and the giant hero of Irish legend, Fionn Mac Cumhaill (or Finn McCool), leader of the Fianna warriors of Ben Bulben. Read More »

Shozenji Temple And The Procession Of Ghosts

Ghost Procession

In 'Ancient Tales and Folk-lore of Japan' (1918), Richard Gordon Smith gives the following account of the ghosts that are said to haunt Shozenji temple.  The temple once stood near Fushimi, which is one of the eleven wards in the city of Kyoto. Read More »

Silkies

Selkies

Silkies are shape shifting sea fairies usually in the form of bright-eyed seals. They are localised to Northern Scotland and the Shetland Islands.

Silkies often came on to land in human form, where they would dance, especially on the night of the full moon. Read More »

Sir David Llwyd of Yspythi Ystwyth

The village of Ysbyty Ystwyth is thought to have been the property of the Knights Hospitallier ( Order of the Knights of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem) and also, maybe the home of one of Wales infamous magicians. Read More »

Sittal Hill, Freiston

Thought to be the site of monks hospital, Spittal Hill can be found at the end of Fox Hole Lane on the A52 and it has a repution of being the haunt of a shag-foal. Read More »

The Six Hills, Stevenage

The six hills which occupy prominence in the town are tumuli or Round Barrows dating from the Bronze Age. According to legend the hills are spade fulls of earth taken from Whomerly wood and thrown at the town by a giant (or the Devil) intent on destruction. His last shot went well off mark and knocked the steeple off Gravely Church two miles away. Read More »

Smoo Cave

Smoo Cave is a limestone cavern consisting of three chambers, a burn enters the second chamber through a hole in the roof falling for a distance of 80 feet. Read More »

Snakes Of The Derwent Valley

James Radclyffe, 3rd Earl of Derwentwater

According to local folklore, before 1715 there were no venomous snakes in the Derwent Valley, but after the execution of the Earl of Derwentwater an abundance of adders started to appear along the length of the river Derwent. Read More »

Snarly Yow

"Snarly Yow" is the name given to a phantom hound which haunted a section of the National Pike near Turner's Gap (Frederick County). The hound was first mentioned by Madeleine V. Dahlgren in 1882. Her book South Mountain Magic details no less than a dozen sightings of the beast. One account is from a Daniel Mesick, whose father kicked at a huge dog near Dame's Quarter. Read More »

Snowdon

Snowdon 1

Standing 3650 ft above sea level, Snowdon is the highest peak in Wales, second highest mountain in Britain and is also probably the busiest due to it popularity with hillwalkers. Read More »

Song, at the Feast of Brougham Castle by William Wordsworth

High in the breathless Hall the Minstrel sate.
And Emont's murmur mingled with the Song.--
The words of ancient time I thus translate,
A festal Strain that hath been silent long.
From Town to Town, from Tower to Tower,
The Red Rose is a gladsome Flower.
Her thirty years of Winter past;
The Red Rose is revived at last; Read More »

Southend-on-Sea Ratman

I thought I'd tell you of a local legend in Southend-on-Sea that I heard growing up and thought you'd enjoy. In our town, there is a pretty grim underpass that's been there for years, and has developed a reputation for being crime-ridden and basically a no-go-area after dark. However, more interesting is the ghost said to haunt it. Read More »

Southport Phantom Voice

John Roby recounted the following story entitled ‘The Phantom Voice’ in his ‘Traditions of Lancashire’ (1872) Read More »

Spirit of Llyn-Nad-y-Forwyn

The following folk tale of a haunting beside the River Colwyn in Beddgelert was taken from Elias Owen's Welsh Folk-Lore (1896). 'It is said that a young man was about to marry a young girl, and on the evening before the wedding they were rambling along the water's side together, but the man was false, and loved another better than the woman whom he was about to wed. Read More »

The Spriggans

Armed Spriggan

Spriggans is the name given to a family of fairies in Cornish folklore, they are the closely related to the Piskies, but were generally believed to be darker and more dangerous than their mischievous cousins. Whereas Piskies are generally described as being cheerful and fun loving, Spriggans are more spiteful and full of malice, directed at humans in the form of evil tricks. Read More »

Spring Heeled Jack – The Terror of the Black Country

Out of the dark, supernatural depths of Victorian England one name stands out. Jack.

Not Jack the Ripper, but a more supernatural fiend - Spring Heeled Jack! Read More »

St Andrew's Parish Church, Alfriston

St Andrew’s Parish Church is a Grade I listed building dating back to 1370. It was built in a cruciform shape and is referred to as The Cathedral of the Downs. There is a siting legend attached to St Andrews Church dating back to its original construction. Read More »

St Augustines Well, Cerne Abbas

St Augustines Well, Cerne Abbas

All the following details were made available on the information board inside the burial ground situated above St Augustine's Well; Read More »

St Bartholomew's Church, Fingest

St Bartholomews Church is a Grade I listed building and dates back to the 12th century. There is a folk good luck custom associated with weddings at St Batholomews, where the groom is expected to lift his bride over the church gate after the ceremony. To ensure this is done the church gate is usually kept locked on such occasions. Read More »

St Catherine's Church, Barmby Moor

Dating from around 1272, St Catherine's Parish Church was largely rebuilt in 1850 replacing much of the original Norman building. In the churchyard, just south of the main door is a stone which has been speculated may have been a place of pagan worship. Read More »

St Chad's Church, Saddleworth

St Chad's Church

Saddleworth church - dedicated to St Chad - has a legend associated with its location. It is said that the original site for the church was on nearby Brown Hill, but every night the stones were mysteriously moved to their present position. Eventually the builders gave up moving the stones back to Brown Hill, and built it where the stones were placed each night. Read More »

St Cynfarch and St Mary Church, Llanfair Dyffryn Clwyd

According to Elias Owen in his 'Welsh folk-lore: a collection of the folk-tales and legends of North Wales' (1887) 'For the following legend, I am indebted to Mr. R. Prys Jones, who resided for several years in the parish of Llanfair Dyffryn Clwyd. In answer to a letter from me respecting mysterious removal of churches, Mr. Read More »



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