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Fetching a Halter

Llyn Gwynant

The following folk tale entitled 'Fetching a Halter' appeared in 'The Welsh Fairy Book' (1908) by W. Jenkyn Thomas 'A VERY large company came together to hold a merry evening at Bwlch Mwrchan, a farmhouse close by Lake Gwynan, in Snowdonia. It was a stormy night. The wind whistled and howled in the woods, tearing the trees like matchsticks. Read More »

The Feytin' Ape

feytin_ape

Here’s a tall tale I collected from a local character when I was researching folklore in Oldham, Lancashire. While the tale is purely fictional it does include some half truths and was ‘doing the rounds’ of the local pubs. Read More »

Ffrith Farm Ghost

The following piece of Ghost lore, which describes poltergeist like activity was given to Elias Owen by a schoolmaster, Mr. Read More »

Ffynnon Elian (St. Elian's Well)

St Elian’s Well, like most Holy Well’s was associated with having healing properties until around 1723 when it developed a reputation for being a cursing well. Thought to have sprang forth to quench the thirst of St Elian in the 6th century, the well was a source of pilgrimage for many centuries. Read More »

Ffynnon Lloer

This mountain lake is situated within the Carneddau range in Snowdonia. The lake has an area of approximately 6 acres, is 250 metres long and is overshadowed by the peaks of Pen yr Ole Wen (the seventh highest peak in Wales (3209 feet)) and Carnedd Dafydd (the third highest peak in Wales (3425 feet)). Read More »

Ffynnon Tegla (St Tegla’s Well)

Ffynnon Tegla, (or St Tegla’s or St Tecla’s Well) can be found on private land* near the River Alyn in Llandegla (Llandegla-yn-Iâl). Read More »

Flibbertigibbet

The flibbertigibbet was a night demon who 'mopped and mowed' between the ringing of the curfew bell and the crowing of the first cock, with the object of terrifying young women.
[The Folklore Of Warwickshire (1976) by Roy Palmer]

The Flying Dutchman

The Flying Dutchman is the most famous example of a phantom ship, although its true origins are now lost in the mists of time. It is the prime folk motif of this type, appearing in various adaptations and in literature, most recently given graphic solidity in the Pirates of the Caribbean films. Read More »

Folklore And The Fin Folk of Orkney

Yesnaby Castle by Wolfgang Schlick

Folklore is an integral part of any cultural heritage. Sometimes written off as childish fairytale, folklore deserves to be recognized as a valuable treasure trove of information about our own past. The tales and legends of folklore are the result of oral tradition handed down by mouth through the generations. Read More »

Folklore of Britain and Ireland

The British Isles and Ireland has a rich diversity of folklore, stemming in part from the mix of cultural identity from region to region. They have had a turbulent history, were invaders and settlers have brought with them their own beliefs and lore, which have become amalgamated into older traditions. Read More »

Forres

King Duff (930AD-966AD) was son of King Malcolm I and succeeded King Indulf to the throne of Alba (Scotland) in 962AD. Culen, son of Indulf attempted to take the throne in battle but failed. However King Duff fell ill shortly afterwards and in his weakened state could not govern the country properly and rebellions began to break out. Read More »

Fountains Abbey

The abbey was founded in 1132 by the Benedictines, but was destroyed 30 years later, and then reconstructed. The abbey became one of the wealthiest in Britain due to the booming medieval wool trade. Its wealth was also to be its downfall, and it was one of the first abbeys to be crushed under the dissolution of the monasteries in 1540. Read More »

Freni-Fawr

This mountain has long been associated with the fairies and is traditionally an entrance to the other world.

Directions: To the West of Crymych

Frustrating the Fairies Day

4 May - Irish day for confusing the fairies so that they could not create any havoc.

Fynnon Galchog (The Lime Well)

This natural spring is situated on flat ground on the northern side of the headland of Great Orme. It is said that it never runs dry, even in times out drought. The water from the well is also said to be beneficial in the development of strong bones and teeth in children. There is an old story linked to this well. Read More »

Galley Hill

A hill called Galley Hill on the outskirts of Luton was in former times the site of a gallows, where public executions would have taken place. Read More »

Geraint The Son Of Erbin

Geraint The Son Of Erbin is a tale from the Mabinogion. The following translation by Lady Charlotte Guest was published in 1877. Read More »

Giggleswick

The ebbing and flowing well: legend tells how a nymph was being chased by a satyr who was overcome with lust. The nymph prayed to the gods and was saved by being turned into a well - famous for healing. The only thing that remained of the nymph was her eternal breath that causes the well to ebb and flow like the tides. Read More »

The Glaistig

Glaistigs

The Glaistig was a solitary supernatural being of the Scottish Highlands, with the upper half of a woman and the lower half of a goat, although she was also believed to appear in human and animal form. Her skin was grey, and long golden hair fell about her body. Like many of the fairy races she was often seen clothed in green, in the form of a long flowing robe, which covered her goat half. Read More »

Glastonbury

Glastonbury Tor Landscape

Glastonbury has been identified with the mysterious Isle of Avalon from the twelfth century, its past has become steeped in myth and legend, and it is probably most famous for its Arthurian and early Christian traditions. Read More »

Glastonbury Tor

Glastonbury Tor

The Tor has been associated with magic and mystery for thousands of years. It seems likely that early man used the tor for rituals, and maze like path has been identified spiralling around the tor seven times. Professor Philip Rahtz dated the terraces to the Neolithic period, and concluded that they may have been part of a maze. Read More »

Glen Maye Water Horse

Arthur William Moore in his The Folk-lore Of The Isle Of Man (1891) gave this account of a haunting connected to a Water Horse in the Glen Maye area. Read More »

Gliwice Vampire Graves (2013)

On 11 July 2013 The Telegraph published the following article by Matthew Day entitled Polish archaeologists unearth 'vampire grave' Read More »

Glyndwr’s Oak

According to the National Gazetteer of Great Britain & Ireland 1868, Newcastle is described as ‘a hamlet…..where are the remains of an ancient castle and an oak said to have been planted by Owain Glyndwr.’ It is said the locals considered the oak to be possessed by evil spirits who harmed anyone that damaged the tree in any way. Read More »

Goblin Market by Christina Georgina Rossetti

Goblin Market

Goblin Market is a poem by Christina Georgina Rossetti (Born 5 December 1830 – Died 29 December 1894) and was first published in 1862 (having been written in 1859). Rossetti, who published children's poems, claimed that the Goblin Market was aimed at children, however, also suggested that it was not, given the sexual imagery it contains.

MORNING and evening Read More »

Craig-y-Nos Castle


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