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Fynnon Galchog (The Lime Well)

This natural spring is situated on flat ground on the northern side of the headland of Great Orme. It is said that it never runs dry, even in times out drought. The water from the well is also said to be beneficial in the development of strong bones and teeth in children. There is an old story linked to this well. Read More »

Galley Hill

A hill called Galley Hill on the outskirts of Luton was in former times the site of a gallows, where public executions would have taken place. Read More »

Geraint The Son Of Erbin

Geraint The Son Of Erbin is a tale from the Mabinogion. The following translation by Lady Charlotte Guest was published in 1877. Read More »

Giggleswick

The ebbing and flowing well: legend tells how a nymph was being chased by a satyr who was overcome with lust. The nymph prayed to the gods and was saved by being turned into a well - famous for healing. The only thing that remained of the nymph was her eternal breath that causes the well to ebb and flow like the tides. Read More »

The Glaistig

Glaistigs

The Glaistig was a solitary supernatural being of the Scottish Highlands, with the upper half of a woman and the lower half of a goat, although she was also believed to appear in human and animal form. Her skin was grey, and long golden hair fell about her body. Like many of the fairy races she was often seen clothed in green, in the form of a long flowing robe, which covered her goat half. Read More »

Glastonbury

Glastonbury Tor Landscape

Glastonbury has been identified with the mysterious Isle of Avalon from the twelfth century, its past has become steeped in myth and legend, and it is probably most famous for its Arthurian and early Christian traditions. Read More »

Glastonbury Tor

Glastonbury Tor

The Tor has been associated with magic and mystery for thousands of years. It seems likely that early man used the tor for rituals, and maze like path has been identified spiralling around the tor seven times. Professor Philip Rahtz dated the terraces to the Neolithic period, and concluded that they may have been part of a maze. Read More »

Glen Maye Water Horse

Arthur William Moore in his The Folk-lore Of The Isle Of Man (1891) gave this account of a haunting connected to a Water Horse in the Glen Maye area. Read More »

Gliwice Vampire Graves (2013)

On 11 July 2013 The Telegraph published the following article by Matthew Day entitled Polish archaeologists unearth 'vampire grave' Read More »

Glyndwr’s Oak

According to the National Gazetteer of Great Britain & Ireland 1868, Newcastle is described as ‘a hamlet…..where are the remains of an ancient castle and an oak said to have been planted by Owain Glyndwr.’ It is said the locals considered the oak to be possessed by evil spirits who harmed anyone that damaged the tree in any way. Read More »

Goblin Market by Christina Georgina Rossetti

Goblin Market

Goblin Market is a poem by Christina Georgina Rossetti (Born 5 December 1830 – Died 29 December 1894) and was first published in 1862 (having been written in 1859). Rossetti, who published children's poems, claimed that the Goblin Market was aimed at children, however, also suggested that it was not, given the sexual imagery it contains.

MORNING and evening Read More »

Goddard Crovan's Stone

Down in the valley of St. Mark's, near a little purling brook, lies the famous granite boulder, weighing between twenty and thirty tons, known by the name of Goddard Crovan's stone. It was cast into this situation one day by Goddard Crovan, son of Harold the Black, of Iceland, who lived with his termagant wife in a great castle on the top of Barrule. Read More »

Godley Green

Said to have been haunted by a phantom hound with a yellow coat. It was as big as a bull. The hound was once attributed to being a phantom lion from a local game park. Most phantom hounds of folklore seem to be black in colour, although a few such as this one appear in different colours.

Godshill Church

The Norman church at Godshill is associated with a legend that is common throughout Britain with slight variations.

Tradition tells that the original site of the church was towards the Southwest, but each night the stones of the church were moved by an unknown agency on to the hill where the church now stands. Read More »

Gokwe Zimbabwean Mermaids

On 6th February 2012 the following article by Dan Newling entitled 'Reason for Zimbabwe reservoir delays... mermaids have been hounding workers away!', appeared in the Daily Mail. Read More »

Gormire Lake & White Mare Crag

Surrounded by the dense Garbutt Wood, Gormire Lake is the result of glacial activity and is one of the few natural lakes in Yorkshire. Gormire Lake has a few little known gems of folklore attached it. One tale involves a witch who was being chased across the moor. Read More »

Grayrigg Hall

There is an interesting piece of folklore relating to a curse connected to an early Quaker named Francis Howgill (born 1618 – died 1669) and Grayrigg Hall, ancestral home of the Duckett family. Read More »

Green Bridge Cave

The cave is associated with the common legend that a fiddler (sometimes a piper in other stories) went in to the cave to play and never returned, perhaps crossing through to the fair realm. His music is still said to be heard now and again from the depths of the cave.

Directions: Pendine is reached from the A4066

The Green Children of Woolpit

Woolpit Village Sign

This story was told by medieval writers (Ralph of Coggestall and William of Newbridge), about the discovery of fairy children in the South of England in the twelfth century.There are two versions of the story, one placed in Suffolk and one in Norfolk, with only a small distance separating them. Read More »

Green Man of Fingest

Henry Burghersh (born 1292 – died 4 December 1340) was consecrated as the Bishop of Lincoln on 20 July 1320. According to the ‘Handbook to the Cathedrals of England’ (1881) ‘Anthony Bek, Chancellor of Lincoln, was elected by the Chapter on Bishop Dalderby's death. Read More »

Grimspound Bronze Age Settlement

Grimspound is a late Bronze Age settlement enclosed by a huge stone wall. The inhabitants were probably cattle farmers and the hut circles are the remains of their homes and pens for the cattle. It is not clear if the outer wall was for defence purposes or to keep the cattle enclosed. Read More »

Gwrach-y-rhybin

A hideous hag who haunts Welsh families, and is also associated with specific places. Read More »

Habergham Hall and the Lady’s Lament

Nothing now remains of Habergham Hall which stood on the western boundary of Burnley not far from the cemetery. Ancestral home of the Habergham family, the following extract concerning traditions surrounding the last Mrs Habergham appeared in ‘Lancashire Legends’ (1873) by John Harland & T T Wilkinson. Read More »

Hairy Bob's Cave

Hairy Bob's Cave

On the seafront at the foot of the cliffs around Scarborough Castle, a hole in the cliff, about a metre deep can be found - this is known as Hairy Bob's Cave. It is clearly man-made and little more than a hole in the rock but, the origins and reasons behind its existence have been the source of legend and folklore in the town for over a century. Read More »

Hardknott Roman Fort (Mediobogdvm)

The Roman Fort of Mediobogdvm, above Hardknott Pass, is said to hold a fairy rath where King Eveling holds his court. Hardnott Pass can be found at the end of the Eskdale Valley and is also one of the steepest roads in Cumbria.



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