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Glyndwr’s Oak

According to the National Gazetteer of Great Britain & Ireland 1868, Newcastle is described as ‘a hamlet…..where are the remains of an ancient castle and an oak said to have been planted by Owain Glyndwr.’ It is said the locals considered the oak to be possessed by evil spirits who harmed anyone that damaged the tree in any way. Read More »

Goblin Market by Christina Georgina Rossetti

Goblin Market

Goblin Market is a poem by Christina Georgina Rossetti (Born 5 December 1830 – Died 29 December 1894) and was first published in 1862 (having been written in 1859). Rossetti, who published children's poems, claimed that the Goblin Market was aimed at children, however, also suggested that it was not, given the sexual imagery it contains.

MORNING and evening Read More »

Goddard Crovan's Stone

Down in the valley of St. Mark's, near a little purling brook, lies the famous granite boulder, weighing between twenty and thirty tons, known by the name of Goddard Crovan's stone. It was cast into this situation one day by Goddard Crovan, son of Harold the Black, of Iceland, who lived with his termagant wife in a great castle on the top of Barrule. Read More »

Godley Green

Said to have been haunted by a phantom hound with a yellow coat. It was as big as a bull. The hound was once attributed to being a phantom lion from a local game park. Most phantom hounds of folklore seem to be black in colour, although a few such as this one appear in different colours.

Godshill Church

The Norman church at Godshill is associated with a legend that is common throughout Britain with slight variations.

Tradition tells that the original site of the church was towards the Southwest, but each night the stones of the church were moved by an unknown agency on to the hill where the church now stands. Read More »

Gokwe Zimbabwean Mermaids

On 6th February 2012 the following article by Dan Newling entitled 'Reason for Zimbabwe reservoir delays... mermaids have been hounding workers away!', appeared in the Daily Mail. Read More »

Gormire Lake & White Mare Crag

Surrounded by the dense Garbutt Wood, Gormire Lake is the result of glacial activity and is one of the few natural lakes in Yorkshire. Gormire Lake has a few little known gems of folklore attached it. One tale involves a witch who was being chased across the moor. Read More »

Grayrigg Hall

There is an interesting piece of folklore relating to a curse connected to an early Quaker named Francis Howgill (born 1618 – died 1669) and Grayrigg Hall, ancestral home of the Duckett family. Read More »

Green Bridge Cave

The cave is associated with the common legend that a fiddler (sometimes a piper in other stories) went in to the cave to play and never returned, perhaps crossing through to the fair realm. His music is still said to be heard now and again from the depths of the cave.

Directions: Pendine is reached from the A4066

The Green Children of Woolpit

Woolpit Village Sign

This story was told by medieval writers (Ralph of Coggestall and William of Newbridge), about the discovery of fairy children in the South of England in the twelfth century.There are two versions of the story, one placed in Suffolk and one in Norfolk, with only a small distance separating them. Read More »

Green Man of Fingest

Henry Burghersh (born 1292 – died 4 December 1340) was consecrated as the Bishop of Lincoln on 20 July 1320. According to the ‘Handbook to the Cathedrals of England’ (1881) ‘Anthony Bek, Chancellor of Lincoln, was elected by the Chapter on Bishop Dalderby's death. Read More »

Grimspound Bronze Age Settlement

Grimspound is a late Bronze Age settlement enclosed by a huge stone wall. The inhabitants were probably cattle farmers and the hut circles are the remains of their homes and pens for the cattle. It is not clear if the outer wall was for defence purposes or to keep the cattle enclosed. Read More »


A hideous hag who haunts Welsh families, and is also associated with specific places. Read More »

Habergham Hall and the Lady’s Lament

Nothing now remains of Habergham Hall which stood on the western boundary of Burnley not far from the cemetery. Ancestral home of the Habergham family, the following extract concerning traditions surrounding the last Mrs Habergham appeared in ‘Lancashire Legends’ (1873) by John Harland & T T Wilkinson. Read More »

Hairy Bob's Cave

Hairy Bob's Cave

On the seafront at the foot of the cliffs around Scarborough Castle, a hole in the cliff, about a metre deep can be found - this is known as Hairy Bob's Cave. It is clearly man-made and little more than a hole in the rock but, the origins and reasons behind its existence have been the source of legend and folklore in the town for over a century. Read More »

Hardknott Roman Fort (Mediobogdvm)

The Roman Fort of Mediobogdvm, above Hardknott Pass, is said to hold a fairy rath where King Eveling holds his court. Hardnott Pass can be found at the end of the Eskdale Valley and is also one of the steepest roads in Cumbria.

Harlech and ‘The Mabinogion’

Much of the Mabinogion saga is based in the Ardudwy region of North Wales. It was from the ‘Castle Rock’ or ‘Rock of Harlech’ (where Harlech Castle now stands) that the Welsh King Bendigeidfran first saw the Irish longboats of Matholwch loom into view with their shields turned upside down as a sign of peace. Read More »

Haunted Lambeth by James Clark

Haunted Lambeth by James Clark

Written by fellow ASSAP (Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) member, James Clark, Haunted Lambeth features a collection of paranormal tales including poltergeists, apparitions, black dogs and other unexplained phenomena. Read More »

Haunted Ships

In the early 1800s Allan Cunningham described his experiences on the Solway Firth and stories around what he referred to as Blawhooly Bay. His piece below entitled 'Haunted Ships' has been reproduced many times throughout the 19th and early 20th century.
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Healing Wells at Healing

The village of Healing near Grimsby has two notable healing wells, though they are probably not the source of the villages name. In the Domesday Book, Healing is shown as being Hegelinge, an Anglo Saxon term, possibly similar to Hægelingas meaning ‘the sons or followers Hægel’. Read More »

Henry Edmund And The Fairies In Llanhilleth

There are many folk tales from Wales concerning fairies carrying people away. One such story is said to have taken place in Llanhilleth (Lanhiddel) and involved Charles Hugh, a person thought to have dealings with them. The following version appeared in British Goblins: Welsh Folk-lore, Fairy Mythology, Legends and Traditions (1881) by Wirt Sykes.
Read More »

Here Is The Story Of Llud And Llevelys

The Story of Llud and Llevelys appears in the The Mabinogion and here is the translation published by Lady Charlotte Guest (1877). Read More »

Hermitage Castle

Hermitage Castle 2

Hermitage Castle has a long and colourful history, the castle was a bastion of power in the 'debatable land': land that was exchanged between English and Scottish hands during the border wars and skirmishes. The castle is steeped in folklore and legend, and there have been reports of varied strange phenomena in recent years. Read More »

The Hexham Heads


It was 1972, and at the Robson family home in Hexham, only ten minutes walk away from where the legendary Wolf of Allendale had roamed the woods, the two young Robson brothers dug up two small, carved stone heads whilst they w Read More »

The Hill of Tara

The Hill of Tara – ancient seat of the Kings of Ireland – is the focal point in a complex landscape of ancient monuments dating from the Neolithic to the Iron Age. It is a stirring setting where mythology and history fuse together, and has been revered as a holy site for thousands of years. Read More »



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