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Hob Hole, Runswick Bay

The haunt of a goblin, Hob, which is a generic term for a brownie of boggle in Yorkshire. This hob was unusual in that the was thought to be able to cure whooping cough, and parents would bring their afflicted child to the cave and recite a rhyme in the hope of a cure.

Directions: Runswick Bay reached via a minor road off the A174 to the Northwest of Whitby.

Hoghton Tower

Dating from 1560-1565, Hoghton Tower is a Grade I listed fortified manor house situated on the highest hill in the Hoghton area. The following tale by John Roby was published in his ‘Traditions of Lancashire’ in 1872. He refers to it being left to decay and by the middle of the 19th century it was derelict. Read More »

Holman Clavel Inn

The Black Downs are also the home of the Holman Clavel Inn, which resides near Blagdon. The Inn was said to house a spirit known as 'Chimbley Charlie', a kind of protective hearth spirit once thought to reside in many homes. Read More »

Holy Island

The island was said to be the home of St Molaise who is reputed to have been born in Ireland in 570AD. He came to Holy Island to live as a hermit and Molaise's cave is one of his reputed abodes. Read More »

Holy Trinity Church, Coverham

Coverham Church

This church dates from the 13th century. Read More »

Hornby Park Mistress and Margaret Brackin

John Harland and T. T. Wilkinson give the following account of a haunting tradition in Lancashire Folk-lore (1867). 'The following story is told and believed by some persons in Hornby. The Park Mistress may be supposed to be the ghost of Lady Harrington, who committed murder three hundred years ago. Margaret Brackin was born in 1745, and died in 1795. Read More »

How Masakuni Regained His Sight

The following story by Richard Gordon Sith was published in his 1918 book 'Ancient Tales and Folk-lore of Japan'. SOME seventy years ago there dwelt in Kyoto a celebrated swordmaker, a native of the province of Awa, in Tokushima. Read More »

Hylton Castle

The Grade I listed ruin of Hylton Castle, seat of the Hylton (previously Hilton) family was built by Sir William Hylton (1376–1435) shortly after 1390. This small four storey gatehouse styled castle, replaced the earlier wooden fortification of Henry de Hilton, which had been built on this site around 1072. Read More »

Ilmington Hunter

In 'The Folklore Of Warwickshire' (1976) Roy Palmer mentions the following tale of an Ilmington man, who, 'with a pack of harriers became obsessed with hunting to the exclusion of everything else, including attendance at church. One night he went out to his hounds when they were howling, but they did not recognise him, and tore him to pieces. Read More »


The following is taken from an article by W Gregor in Folklore [A Quarterly Review Of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892). ‘Mr. A. Oldfield, in his account of The Aborigines of Australia, says that the natives believe that every deep muddy pool is inhabited by a Spirit called In-gnas, whose powers for mischief seem particularly active during night. Read More »

Ince Hall, Ince-in-Makerfield

Ince Hall, wigan

John Roby in his 'Traditions of Lancashire' (1872) relates the following tale which he entitled 'The Haunted Manor House', which he identifies as being Ince Hall in Wigan. As Roby acknowledges, there are a few buildings known as Ince Hall which leads to confusion when trying to identify the exactly where this tale is said to be based. Read More »

Inchmahome Priory

Cloisters at Inchmahome Priory

Situated on an island in the middle of Lake Menteith, the only 'Lake' in Scotland, Inchmahome Priory is a ruined Augustine (The Black Cannons) priory founded in 1238 by Walter Comyn, who was the Earl of Menteith. The Earl is likely to have founded the monastery for the good of his soul, and to show of his status as an important landowner. Read More »

Inkberrow Siting Legend

In his‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890), Edwin Sidney Hartland gives the following account of a siting legend. Read More »

Irish Folklore

From Newgrange - a reminder of a great age of monument building and ritual - through to natural wonders such as the Giant's Causeway, Ireland is a land of legend and mystery. The landscape is full of echoes of history interwoven with a rich mythology that forms an impressive and colourful heritage. Read More »

IRISH FOLKLORE COMMISSION 1935-1970 : History, Ideology, Methodology

Irish Folklore Commission

IRISH FOLKLORE COMMISSION 1935-1970 : History, Ideology, Methodology [Micheal Briody] Between 1935 and 1970 the Irish Folklore Commission (Coimisiún Béaloideasa Éireann), under-funded and at great personal cost to its staff, assembled one of the world's largest folklore collections. Read More »

Isabel Gowdie, Witch of Auldearn

Isabel (Isobel) Gowdie was a young housewife from Auldearn in Nairnshire who is remembered not just for being tried as a witch, but for her detailed confession. Her trial was in 1662 and what makes her confession so interesting, apart from the detail, is that is that it was supposedly taken without the use of torture. Read More »

Isle of Man Mermaid (1961)

According to Peter Costello in The Magic Zoo, there were several sightings of a mermaid around the Isle of Man during 1961. One of the witnesses was said to be the Lady Mayor of Peel. In August 1961 the Manx Tourist Board apparently offered a prize to whoever could capture the mermaid alive.

Isle of Yell Mermaid

In July 1833 a team of six fishermen entangled a mermaid in their fishing lines off the Isle of Yell. Read More »

Ivar And Matilda

"In the year 1249 Reginald began to reign on the 6th May, and on the 30th May of the same month was slain by the Knight Ivar and his accomplices."--Chronicon Manniæ. There was a young and gallant knight, named Ivar, who was enamoured of a very beautiful maiden, named Matilda. He loved her ardently, and she reciprocated his affection. Read More »

Jack o' Legs

This folktale was kindly brought to our attention by Alma Oakley of Weston in Hertfordshire.

Weston churchyard is reputed to be the final resting place of the Weston Giant: Jack o' Legs. Two stones mark his grave. One is positioned at his head and another at his feet, a distance of eight feet apart. Read More »

Jamie Freel and the Young Lady

The following story from' Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry' by William Butler Yeats (1888) takes place in Fannet, which is now known as Fanad, a peninsular by Lough Swilly. Although the tale includes a trip across the length of Ireland, according to the story the hero states he is nearly home when approaching Tamney, so I have used this village for my map reference below. Read More »

Jersey Devil –The Origins

Jersey Devil

Over the last 250 years there have been several sightings of a creature that has become known as the Jersey Devil (or Leeds Devil). Described as being bipedal with hooves and wings, the Jersey Devil would apparently dry up the milk within cows by breathing upon them. Read More »

Jewett City Vampires

The following article by Megan Baird entitled 'In 1854, vampire panic struck Connecticut town' was published in the Register Citizen on 2 November 2008.  

GRISWOLD, Conn. (AP) — In May of 1854, the Ray family of Jewett City was frantic. Read More »

John Jenkin Devil Summoner

Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins (1881) gives the following account of a devil summoning ceremony performed by a schoolmaster and renowned conjurer named John Jenkin in Pembrokeshire. Read More »

John MacInnes And The Each-Uisge

According to Mr. J. Calder Ross in 'Scottish Notes and Queries' (1893) "John MacInnes found the labour of his farm sadly burdensome. In the midst of his sighing an unknown being appeared to him and promised a horse to him under certain conditions. These conditions John undertook to fulfil. Read More »



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