You are hereFolklore / Fairies

Fairies


Llangar Church, Corwen

The white washed Llangar Church can be found about a mile from Corwen and can be dated from the late 13th century though it could possibly be as old as the 11th century. Its original name of 'Llan Garw Gwyn' (The Church of The White Deer) possibly alludes to a legend dating back its initial erection. Read More »

Llyn Barfog (The Bearded Lake)

Llyn Barfog is situated in high countryside above the northern banks of the River Dyfi. The lake is isolated, small, and covered with yellow water lilies in the summer. Sir John Rhys in Celtic Folklore suggests that it was originally called Llyn-y-Barfog (The Bearded One’s Lake) referring to some ancient mythical being who would have lived there. Read More »

Llyn Coch (Red Lake)

If you ascend Yr Wyddfa (Mount Snowdon) on the Snowdon Ranger path you will encounter Llyn Coch. Legend has it that this lake is a favourite abode of the Tylwth Teg (Fairy Folk). There is a ‘Fairy Bride’ legend associated with the lake, one version of which goes something like this: Read More »

Llyn Cowlyd

On the edge of the Carneddau range of mountains in Snowdonia lays the deepest lake in North Wales, Llyn Cowlyd. The lake has been dammed so it is unnaturally deep, but it has given soundings of 229 feet, and has a mean depth of 109 feet. The lake is almost 2 miles long, and a third of a mile wide, with the adjacent hills dropping steeply to the lakes edges. Read More »

Llyn Du'r Arddu

In 'Celtic Folklore Welsh And Manx' (1901) John Rhys describes the following tale he was told concerning a fairy bride in the summer of 1881. ‘An old woman, called Siân Dafydd, lived at Helfa Fawr, in the dingle called Cwm. Brwynog, along the left side of which you ascend as you go to the top of Snowdon, from the village of lower Llanberis, or Coed y Ddol, as it is there called. Read More »

Llyn Ebyr

Edwin Sidney Hartland gives the following tale about how a mother retrieved her twin children after they had been replaced by fairy changelings in his ‘The Science of Fairy Tales’ (1891)’ ‘Water's antagonism to witches is notorious; and ample use was made of it in the old witch trials. Read More »

Llyn Irddyn

There is an old local tradition about Llyn Irddyn, that it is unwise to walk too close the shore or the water’s edge because it is inhabited by mischievous fairies. However, they cannot harm you if you walk on the grass.

Llyn Y Fan Fach

Traditionally the lake is thought to have been bottomless, and it has long been associated with fairies. Read More »

Llyn y Forwyn

The following tale of Llyn y Forwyn (Damsel’s Pool) appeared in ‘Celtic Folklore Welsh And Manx’ (1901) by John Rhys and was in turn a translation of a Welsh language version featured in Elfed and Cadrawd’s ‘Cyfaill yr Aelwyd a'r Frythones’ (1892). Read More »

Llyn-yr-Afanc (The Beaver Pool)

The Beaver Pool can be found about a mile to the south of Betws-y-Coed where the A470 turns at the Fairy Glen to cross the Beaver Bridge. Legend has it, that this is the pool that the Betws-y-Coed Afangc once lived and terrorised the locals. Read More »

Loch Druich Mermaids

Selkies

There is a story connected to Loch Druich and three brothers who happened across a troupe of merfolk. One night the brothers were by the loch side when they saw a group of seals come up onto the beach and shred their furry skins. Beneath the skins were naked people, who danced together on the shore. Read More »

Loch Leetie

According to an article by W Gregor in Folklore [A Quarterly Review Of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892) ‘This is a loch in Nairnshire. It was the common belief that a bull lived in it. He was often heard roaring very loudly, particularly during frost. (Told by Mrs. Miller.)’

Loch Na Fideil

Loch Na Fideil was reputedly the home of a legendary female creature or spirit known as the Fideal after which the body of water is named (Loch of the Fideal). Depending upon which source you read, she attacks either men or women and children, dragging them down under the water in order to devour them. Read More »

Loch Ness Water Horse

James Mackinlay in his Folklore of Scottish Lochs and Springs (1893) tells of another creature that was said to lurch in Loch Ness. 'A noted demon-steed once inhabited Loch Ness, and was a cause of terror to the inhabitants of the neighbourhood. Read More »

Loch Treig Water Horse

The freshwater Loch Treig (Loch of Death) has been a reservoir since 1929, however prior to this it had a reputation of being the home to some very dangerous Water Horses or Each Uisge. Read More »

Lochan-Nan-Deaan

The following extract is taken from Folklore [A Quarterly Review of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892). 'This is a small loch on the side of the old military* road between Gorgarff and Tomintoul. The road passes close by its brink on the west side. On the other side of the road is an almost perpendicular rock, between 400 and 500 feet high. Read More »

Lochan-wan (Lambs' Loch)

The following extract is taken from Folklore [A Quarterly Review of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892). ‘Lochan-wan* is a small loch, in a fine grazing district, lying on the upper confines of Aberdeen and Banffshire. Read More »

Lochranza

Lochranza and Castle

Lochranza is situated at the Northern Tip of Arran, the loch contains a small island with a ruined castle, which was mentioned by Sir Walter Scott Read More »

Lough Neagh

The freshwater Lough Neagh covers an area of 151 square miles and is Northern Ireland’s largest lake. There are a few legends associated with Lough Neagh and its formation. The following account entitled ‘This is the Death of Eochaidh son of Mairid’ is from the Book of the Dun Cow, Translated by Standish Hayes O'Grad (1892). Read More »

Lukki Minnie

The following account of the tale of Lukki Minnie appeared in Malachy Tallack's blog on the New Stateman website (30 April 2007). 'For centuries – perhaps even for millennia, no-one is entirely sure – Shetland has been home to a very special creature. Read More »

Martin Mere, Burscough

In 2002 there were reports of a large underwater predator, probably a huge catfish living in the lake and eating the local swans. The following BBC report dates from 27 July 2002.

'A giant fish which has attacked swans at a bird sanctuary has been spotted by wildlife experts. Read More »

Mermaid's Grave

Pictish Mermaid

A mermaid is said to be buried in the sands in the area around Nunton. In 1830 some women who were gathering seaweed spotted a mermaid in the waters close to the shore.They tried in vain to catch her, but she was too clever for them. Read More »

Mermaids

Mermaid

Tales of mermaids have been around for centuries, and form a large part of seafaring lore, especially round the coastal areas of Britain such as Cornwall, and the Northern Isles of Scotland. Their sighting was thought to be a bad omen, foretelling storms and rough seas. There are numerous folk tales describing their interaction with humans. Read More »

Midwife For A Nixie

A midwife in Westerhausen was sitting one evening at home when someone knocked on her window and shouted that she should come outside. She did so, and there stood a nix, who told her to follow him. They walked to the Beck [a deep pond near Westerhausen], and the nix took a rod and struck the water with it. The water separated, and with dry feet they walked to the bottom. Read More »

Myers Flat

An article in the North Echo entitled ‘How railway builders took on the fairies’ was published on Monday 16 June 2008. It concerns the building of the Stockton and Darlington Railway in 1823 and refers to the local belief that fairies hindered progress at Myers Flat. Read More »

Craig-y-Nos Castle


Rooms from £55.00 per night midweek with continental breakfastRooms from £55.00 per night midweek with continental breakfast



Share/Save

Navigation

Recent comments

Featured Site