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The Lady Of The Fountain

The Lady Of The Fountain is one the tales in the Mabinogion. This English translation by Lady Charlotte Guest was published in 1877. Read More »

The Lady With The Lantern, St Ives

‘The Lady With The Lantern’(1) is a story which appeared in English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ by Edwin Sidney Hartland [1890]. It is reproduced below complete with footnote. Read More »

The Laird of Balmachie's Wife

This tale involves a fairy abduction and replacement by a changeling, in this case a Laird's wife, a rather larger burden than the usual child. The original story can be found in Folklore and Legends of Scotland by W.W Gribbins. Read More »

The Lapland Clergyman's Wife who was Midwife to a Troll

According to ‘The Science of Fairy Tales’ (1891) by Edwin Sidney Hartland ‘A clergyman's wife in Swedish Lappmark, the cleverest midwife in all Sweden, was summoned one fine summer's evening to attend a mysterious being of Troll race and great might, called Vitra. At this unusual call she took counsel with her husband, who, however, deemed it best for her to go. Read More »

The Lions

The two peaks known as The Lions are one of Vancouver's most recognizable landmarks measuring 5400ft (West Lion) and 5269ft (East Lion). Named Ch'ich'iyúy Elxwíkn (Twin Sisters) by the indigenous Squamish people, the peaks represent two Squamish sisters who marred Haida men and created a peace between the two nations. Read More »

The Llandegla Spirit

The parish church of Llandegla is dedicated to St Tecla of Iconium (modern day Konya in Turkey) and though the original building dated from 1273, it was rebuilt in 1866 by Lady Margaret Willoughby de Broke. There is a folk-tale and tradition concerning the haunting and subsequent exorcism of the rectory. Read More »

The Lost Child

Robert Hunt in his 'Popular Romances of the West of England; or, The Drolls, Traditions, and Superstitions of Old Cornwall' (1865) gives an account of the lost child of Trefonick which was given to him thirty years earlier by an old woman of the parish. Read More »

The Lost Land of Wales

This tale is one of two stories of a similar theme attached to Cardigan Bay in Gwynedd. This story is the later one of the two and explains how a realm was lost to the sea through debauchery and drunkenness. There are traces of walls and roadways under the sea at Cardigan Bay, they can be seen at low tide and may have given rise to the legend of the 'Lost Lowland Hundred'. Read More »

The Mermaid Of Knockdolion

'THE old house of Knockdolion stood near the water of Girvan, with a black stone at the end of it. A mermaid used to come from the water at night, and taking her seat upon this stone, would sing for hours, at the same time combing her long yellow hair. Read More »

The Mermaid Wife

A STORY is told of an inhabitant of Unst, who, in walking on the sandy margin of a voe, saw a number of mermen and mermaids dancing by moonlight, and several seal-skins strewed beside them on the ground. At his approach they immediately fled to secure their garbs, and, taking upon themselves the form of seals, plunged immediately into the sea. Read More »

The Midwife Of Listowel

"Why do you call the fairies 'good people?'" asked I.
"I don't call them the good people myself," answered Duvane, "but that is what the man called them who told me the story. Some call them the good people to avoid vexing them. I think they are called the good people mostly by pious men and women, who say that they are some of the fallen angels." Read More »

The Miller at the Professor’s Examination

THERE once came to England a famous foreign professor, and before he came he gave notice that he would examine the students of all the colleges in England. After a time he had visited all but Cambridge, and he was on his road thither to examine publicly the whole university. Read More »

The Mumby Boggart And The Crafty Farmer

A farmer bought a new field, which was inhabited by a squat, hairy boggart, a kind of troll. The boggart refused to allow the farmer to plant anything in the field, claiming it was his and the farmer had no right to it. The farmer, in turn, pointed out that he'd paid good money for the land and by right he ought to be able to use it. Read More »

The Old Man And The Fairies

The following story appeared in P. H. Emerson's 'Welsh Fairy-Tales and Other Stories' (1894).  Many years ago the Welsh mountains were full of fairies. People used to go by moonlight to see them dancing, for they knew where they would dance by seeing green rings in the grass. Read More »

The Parish of St Andrew, Leyland

The Parish of St Andrew in Leyland dates from 1220, though it is thought a church has been on this site since the 12th Century. The church has had several alterations over the centuries, but what I want to concentrate on is the initial construction of the first church and the siting legends associated with it. Read More »

The Pedlar of Swaffham

The following story entitled ‘The Pedlar of Swaffham’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. Read More »

The Poor Man Of Peatlaw

THE following is an account of a fairy frolic said to have happened late in the last century:--The victim of elfin sport was a poor man, who, being employed in pulling heather upon Peatlaw, a hill in Selkirkshire, had tired of his labour, and laid him down to sleep upon a fairy ring. Read More »

The Princess of Canterbury

The following tale entitled ‘The Princess of Canterbury’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. ‘IN days of yore, when this country was governed by many kings, among the rest the King of Canterbury had an only daughter, wise, fair, and beautiful. Read More »

The Princess of Colchester

The following tale entitled ‘The Princess of Colchester’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. ‘LONG before Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, there reigned in the eastern part of England a king who kept his Court at Colchester. Read More »

The Recovered Bride

The following tale taken from 'Legendary Fictions of the Irish Celt's, by Patrick Kennedy (1866). It also appears in 'Beltane: Springtime Rituals, Lore & Celebration' by Raven Grimassi (2001). Read More »

The Roaring Bull of Bagbury

The following story entitled ‘The Roaring Bull of Bagbury’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. Read More »

The Sands of Cocker

The following story entitled ‘The Sands of Cocker’ was published in ‘Goblin Tales of Lancashire’ by James Bowker (1878). Read More »

The Servant Girl And The Elves

Once upon a time there was a poor servant girl who was diligent and neat. Every day she swept out the house and shook the sweepings onto a large pile outside the door. One morning just as she was beginning her work she found a letter on the pile of sweepings. She could not read, so she stood her broom in the corner and took the letter to her employers. Read More »

The Shepherd of Myddvai

LynnY Fan Fach

This tale tells how a young shepherd won and lost a fairy bride from Lynn y Fan Fach (Van Vach), the fairy lake at the foot of Bannau Sir Gaer in the Brecon Beacons. This version was collected and told by Joseph Jacobs and appeared in his book Celtic Fairy Tales published in 1892 (David Nutt). Read More »

The Siege of Lathom

Siege of Lathom

Nothing now remains of the original Lathom House, the last Royalist stronghold in Lancashire, which was besieged by Parliamentarian forces for three months in 1644. Read More »



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