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Daniel Parkinson's picture
Daniel Parkinson
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Joined: 22 Jul 2008

Just back from Stirling, missed the ghost tour but managed to do the tour of the jail, it was well worth it the guide was entertaining (he also does the ghost tour) he had my wife in neck irons so he  gets my vote. 
The old town is full of sites, managed to get out walking as well up Ben Ledi near Callender which has associations with Beltane rites although the origins may be dubious, there is an old corpse road through a Bealach (saddle between two hills) below Ben Ledi known as the pass of the dead these old routeways are full of folklore and other associations although how anyone got up there with a coffin is beyond me. Legend also suggets that a funeral party was lost in a lochan near the site when they tried to cross the ice in midwinter. I will do write up soon.

Seannachaidh (not verified)
Jails

I went to the police museum in Edinburgh once, and was admiring neck irons, and various other instruments.  I turned to the policeman (one assumes he was a guide, though he was very quiet) and said, they were all a bit bondage-like with the shackles and stuff, weren't they?  He just looked at me and went "No".

The funeral party was the unfortunate Keppoch clan. 

I think the Beltane bit is to do with a custom all over Scotland whereby maidens go up the hill to wash their faces in the morning dew to be beautiful all year, perhaps some tour guide in the past made a bigger deal of it there than in other places.  I've heard midsummer was the celebration that was more famous for lasting into modern times on Ben Ledi if you are doing research though.

Legends of supernatural water creature in Loch Lubnaig there, especially one that lives near the waterfalls.

Daniel Parkinson's picture
Daniel Parkinson
User offline. Last seen 2 years 30 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 22 Jul 2008
Seannachaidh wrote: I went
Seannachaidh wrote:

I went to the police museum in Edinburgh once, and was admiring neck irons, and various other instruments.  I turned to the policeman (one assumes he was a guide, though he was very quiet) and said, they were all a bit bondage-like with the shackles and stuff, weren't they?  He just looked at me and went "No".

Legends of supernatural water creature in Loch Lubnaig there, especially one that lives near the waterfalls.

He obviously had a sense of humour bypass - unless he was an expert on bondage:-)
Would be interested in the story of the water creature in Loch Lubnaig.
I did wonder if there was more to the story of the lochan and the funeral party, i.e. could it there be an older tradition here as a sacred place? found no evidence as yet though. I am putting together a piece to cover all the sites I went to. According to Wikipedia Ben Ledi's association as a holy mountain was down to a misinterpretation of gaelic in 1791 when it was copied over into english as the hill of god rather than the hill of the slope.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Ledi
I do think there are some imortant associations here though.
As usual with Scottish hills my plan on getting good pics from the top were sabotaged by the weather, in this case a thunderstorm.

Seannachaidh (not verified)
The Keppoch, or it might


The Keppoch, or it might have been the Kessanach clan, would have to check, were particularly unfortunate, if I remember correctly. They lived on one of the western islands and their well dried up or moved, and the whole clan moved to the area round Loch Lubnaig, only to have 200 members of that branch die in the accident at Lochan-nan-Corps. Story goes that they often went straight over the loch as a shortcut from the church at Finglas to the graveyard at St Brides. During the night there had been a weird thaw (some say it is related to the water horse creature in the loch who had stoked his underwater firemaker to warm a maiden he had trapped there as his wife, common loch legend). Anyhow, the ice was thin (over his chimney) and the whole party fell into the waters and died.

Whats more, if you walk up the centre of a road after dark in the highlands, you are likely to see ghostly funeral processions, and be dragged in their wake (common belief). If you are dragged in the wake of this ghostly procession, it will be a watery grave for you too!

The other water creature is an urisk, lives at a small falls on the banks of Loch Lubnaig. Not my local area so not familiar with the story but just remember that part, but I can find out if it interests you, I know a storyteller from that area.
 
As to the name, other names in the area, like Leny and other Ledi's make me think the other etymology is an attempt to hide pagan origins.  Certainly there are Beltane and Midsummer rites assosciated with this hill.

Agricola's picture
Agricola
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Joined: 15 Oct 2008
The most fascinating exhibit

The most fascinating exhibit at the police museum is the purse made from the skin of Burke (or is it Hare) of Burke and Hare (aka Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)



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