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Do We Need A Thermal Sweep?


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Mauro
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Just one quick thing.One of

Just one quick thing.
One of the most definitive "proofs" offered about thermal imagining applied to paranormal research is the famous "Ghost Knight of Bardi". Bardi is a castle in the Italian Appenines about thirty miles southwest of Parma which has become somewhat of a tourist attraction thanks to its stunning views and, more importantly, much advertised haunting.
A thermal image of the "Ghost Knight" was taken in 1999 by two researchers from the University of Bologna using a thermocamera. You can see the famous picture here: www.fantasmitalia.it/bardi.htm . Just scroll to the bottom of the page, should you need translation just ask. A giant copy of this picture greets visitors to the castle.
Curiously this picture bears a great resemblace to a painting of Francesco Gonzaga, Marquis of Mantua and a condottiere of great renown, by the great painter Mantegna. Even more curiously the allied army led by Francesco Gonzaga suffered a catastrophic defeat at the hands of the French in 1495 at Fornovo, which is just a few miles away and can be seen from the castle itself. Gonzaga escaped with his life but, despite having shown great personal valor, was rightly criticized for his outdated tactics which allowed the Charles VIII to defeat his army so quickly.
This opens very interesting possibilities on the matter.

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"Louhi spoke in riddled tones of three things to achieve: find and catch the Devil's Moose and bring it here to me. Seize the Stallion born of Fire, harness the Golden Horse. He captured and bound the Moose, he tamed the Golden Horse. Still there remained one final task: hunt for the Bird from the Stream of Death"

-Kalevala, Rune XIII-


Mysteryshopper
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Mauro wrote: This opens
Mauro wrote:

This opens very interesting possibilities on the matter.

It's an image of something. Could be a reflection. Is there any good evidence that it is a ghost?

Mauro
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According to reports the

According to reports the image was taken by the thermocamera on a short flight of stairs leading to a place called "The Executioner's Room". 31 frames were taken over a one hour period and this is the only one showing an anomaly. According to analysis the anomaly is about 0.4°C cooler than the surroundings except for the noticeable spot in the middle which is about 1.3°C cooler.
The room had been picked because it's traditionally believed to be the "most haunted": four researchers and two castle staff members were guarding the room to insure against intrusions. About your question: nobody saw anything at the moment nor noticed anything unusual so it's not a thermal image of a certified ghost. It's "just" an anomaly which, with a bit of imagination, has been seen as a bearded man with long hair.
Personally I favor a gust of cold air playing tricks or equipment malfunction. But again your guess is as good as mine.

__________________

"Louhi spoke in riddled tones of three things to achieve: find and catch the Devil's Moose and bring it here to me. Seize the Stallion born of Fire, harness the Golden Horse. He captured and bound the Moose, he tamed the Golden Horse. Still there remained one final task: hunt for the Bird from the Stream of Death"

-Kalevala, Rune XIII-


Mysteryshopper
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Joined: 15 Oct 2008
Cold air should make no

Cold air should make no difference as it is IR we're talking about. However, it could be a reflection. Was anyone around when the photo was taken? Is it a security camera or was a thermal imager being used for a some special purpose?

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Agricola
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 Mauro Is the thermal image

 Mauro

Is the thermal image cropped or is there a non-thermal image of the location it's taken from? Looks to me like an overhead shot of a rat or something which has been moving around, or something along those lines.

PhenomInvestigator
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Important detail

I realized I forgot to mention something quite critical which was the source of personal embarrassment years ago when I first discovered it. Of course the thermal imagers measure black body radation in the IR range, in other words they show the thermal mass of objects. They do not read air temperatures. So how to use an imager to show changes in the temperature in an area? We tried several ideas and finally came used a target object with a known thermal mass. This object is placed in the environment over a period of time so that it tracks the temperature changes occuring in the immediate proximity. This is not the same thing as pointing an imaging camera at a point and reading whatever emissions are occurring on surface bodies in that direction. In this approach, we put a known body in free space and image that body specifically, watching for an indication of a temperature shift on the object. This avoids some of the usual pitfalls of using thermal imagers with the tradeoff that the device must be kept stationary for a period of time, therefore limiting the area of detection for that period.

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Mysteryshopper
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PhenomInvestigator
PhenomInvestigator wrote:

Of course the thermal imagers measure black body radation in the IR range, in other words they show the thermal mass of objects. 

You can't equate black body radiation with thermal mass directly. Thermal mass is about heat flow while black body radiation is about surface temperature and emissivity.

What substance did you use as your target? Presumably you wanted something with very low thermal mass so that it reacted quickly with large temperature differences (a metal?). How did you thermaly isolate it from objects it was touching?

Wouldn't it just be a lot simpler to put a thermometer in the area of interest? It would be much more accurate, simpler to read and faster to react?



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