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Eyewitnesses and medical professionals


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Agricola's picture
Agricola
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Joined: 15 Oct 2008

Something someone wrote on another post got me thinking. The post said as an investigator you should try to make subjects/victims feel at ease. While I don't think an investigator should make them feel uncomfortable, nor should they be ridiculed, I think that putting them at ease suggests that you would have to give them reassurances which couldn't really be fulfilled.

This is a slight asside as what I really want to know is that, as an investigator, are you in a suitable position to deal with someone who may have experienced a major traumatic incident, which in any non-paranormal circumstances would be dealt with by a medical professional? 

And secondly, how do you deal with people who have clearly experienced something with a rational explanation, but are convinced otherwise possibly because they are inclined in that direction because they have an imbalance of the four humours as the Greeks would have said (couldn't think of a better way to phrase that without causing offence). Would you go along with these people, not wanting to offend them, or would you tell it to them blunt that it's all in their imagination?

Mysteryshopper
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Joined: 15 Oct 2008
People generally appreciate

People generally appreciate an honest opinion. You need to explain in detail why all the evidence leads to the conclusion you've come to. Many people will accept that, often with relief. However, if they still think they've witnessed something paranormal, when they haven't, they will usually go to someone else (probably an obvious believer) for a 'second opinion'. It's their choice and there's not much you can do about it.

Ian Topham's picture
Ian Topham
User offline. Last seen 9 hours 6 min ago. Offline
Joined: 22 Jul 2008
Excellent post

Excellent post Agricola.

Agricola wrote:

The post said as an investigator you should try to make subjects/victims feel at ease. While I don't think an investigator should make them feel uncomfortable, nor should they be ridiculed, I think that putting them at ease suggests that you would have to give them reassurances which couldn't really be fulfilled.

As far as putting them at ease goes I think it means ensuring they are comfatable to talk with you about their experience, not reassuring them everything will be sorted out.

Agricola wrote:

This is a slight asside as what I really want to know is that, as an investigator, are you in a suitable position to deal with someone who may have experienced a major traumatic incident, which in any non-paranormal circumstances would be dealt with by a medical professional?

I think you have to look at each case as it comes along and make a judgement from there.  The majority of witnesses I think you'll find have just had a minor experience and it has sparked an interest they want following up.  Given that some paranormal experiences maybe more psychological than supernatural the help of a medical professional shouldn't be ruled out at all.

Mysteryshopper wrote:

However, if they still think they've witnessed something paranormal, when they haven't, they will usually go to someone else (probably an obvious believer) for a 'second opinion'. It's their choice and there's not much you can do about it.

I think your right there.  Some people will just seek other opinions until they find the somebody who shares their point of view and supports their beliefs.



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