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Fault Lines


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Agricola's picture
Agricola
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The Great Glen fault line

The Great Glen fault line cuts across the north of Scotland from Colonsay in the Hebrides to Shetland and there are frequent tremors but, as far as I'm aware, no UFO or aerial phenomena hot spots. There have been a few other things seen on one of the lochs though...

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Ian Topham
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Agricola wrote:There have
Agricola wrote:

There have been a few other things seen on one of the lochs though...

Like what?  UFO's?

Agricola's picture
Agricola
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More like an unidentified

More like an unidentified swimming object - the fault runs under/through Loch Ness. Actually, I'm wondering if there are any reports of lights being seen on the water? I can't recall any, but Urisk might be more knowledgable on this.

As I say, I'm not aware of any UFO hotspots in the Highlands, along the faultline. However, on a slight asside, I seem to recall reading somewhere that the original founders of the Findhorn Community, who were heavily influenced by alien visitors and UFOs in the '50s and '60s were orginal based in the hills around Loch Ness.

I've got family living on the faultline and I'll give them a probe over Christmas.

Mysteryshopper
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Great Glen fault

There are faults everywhere. I don't see why there should be anything special about the Great Glen fault. For a fault was associated with magnetic activity (and evidence is very thin) it would depend on the type of rocks traversed.

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BaronIveagh
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Shake and Bake

The only connection I know of is that occasionally geologically active areas can release mildly hallucinogenic gasses. 

Oh, and that areas where large numbers of people are killed are marginally more prone to hauntings then areas where mass slaughter has not occured.  So areas around fault lines may be more prone to such things, where faults pass through cities or shake up crater lakes full of CO2.

Summum Nec Metuam Diem Nec Optima

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Ian Topham
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BaronIveagh wrote: Oh, and
BaronIveagh wrote:

Oh, and that areas where large numbers of people are killed are marginally more prone to hauntings then areas where mass slaughter has not occured. 

I don't know if hauntings are tied to places where people have died or not.  They have to be tied into where people are present to witness the experience.  Therefore we would expect to get more hauntings reported in cities than on an unpopulated island or rarely visited field.  Population centres will come with a history of deaths which some may get attributed to the hauntings.

Geography and geology and the topography would probably have had some say in the placement of settlements though.

Mysteryshopper
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BaronIveagh wrote: The only
BaronIveagh wrote:

The only connection I know of is that occasionally geologically active areas can release mildly hallucinogenic gasses. 

Which gasses?

Quote:

Oh, and that areas where large numbers of people are killed are marginally more prone to hauntings then areas where mass slaughter has not occured. .

Do you have any evidence for that? I don't know of any.

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BaronIveagh
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Mysteryshopper
Mysteryshopper wrote:
BaronIveagh wrote:

The only connection I know of is that occasionally geologically active areas can release mildly hallucinogenic gasses. 

Which gasses?

ethelyne, methane, H2S, CO2 spring to mind, all of which, under the right circumstances can cause altered cognitive states.


Mysteryshopper wrote:
BaronIveagh wrote:

Quote:

Oh, and that areas where large numbers of people are killed are marginally more prone to hauntings then areas where mass slaughter has not occured. .

Do you have any evidence for that? I don't know of any.


Consider the proportion of ghost sightings, for example, between Gettysburg, PA, USA, and Salamanca, NY.  Both are approximately the same size, and exist in similar climates, Salamanca, being slightly colder, and both geologically stable, though Salamanca is somewhat more hilly.  However, the number of alleged hauntings is wildly different.  Further, almost 90% of reports of phantoms at Gettysburg related to the battle, where as the handful of cases from Salamanca are related to events that are widely distributed in time.

Granted, you could argue statistical fluke, and I'd have to concede that I do not have hard data for other locations to argue the point.  I can only suggest examining the numbers of reports between similar sized locations of comparable age and then examine how many alleged hauntings occur in ones with disaster and war in their past to ones without.

Summum Nec Metuam Diem Nec Optima



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