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Haunted Battlefields


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Agricola's picture
Agricola
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That's not unusual.

That's not unusual. Artefacts often 'travel up' through soil because of action below the surface, such as animal activity, ploughing, etc. Hence why people find old coins, etc when out and about.

BaronIveagh's picture
BaronIveagh
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There's a bit of difference

There's a bit of difference between lightweight coins and a Panzer IV. However, your point is well made.

I was just observing that it was unusually widespread and abrupt enough that archeologists had commented on it.

Here's one that's interesting: at RAF Hemswell there's supposedly a ghost of a pilot walking around with his clothes on fire.

Agricola's picture
Agricola
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Without knowing the details

Without knowing the details of the find location of the tank, it's hard to really comment on it. If it's been found on a beach/tidal area then it's rediscovery is hardly exceptional, whereas if it's been found in the middle of an arable field then it certainly may be remarkable. Of course as with all such stories, until the background is reliably explained by a reputable source (i.e. a journal and not a newspaper) you can only take it at face value.

Ian Topham's picture
Ian Topham
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I've added a Haunted

I've added a Haunted Battlefield catagory under the hauntings menu now.

Mauro
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I would take any news

I would take any news regarding heavy weaponry from the former Soviet Bloc cum grano salis. For example a few years ago a farmer in Slovakia "discovered" an 88mm Flak in his backyard which was promptly auctioned off to eager collectors for a ridicolous sum of money. Needless to say nobody knew where it had been for sixty years, maybe it just appeared there one morning out of the blue, an incredible feat of telekynesis or materialization since that gun weighs several tons. Or maybe the fact that the farmer could sell its prize without fear of being squeezed by local authorities and the fact that he now owned a powerful tractor are the correct answers...
I would also add that in Continental Europe "discovering war relics" is a pretty common way of getting rid of old weapons that were hidden at the end of the war by, say, your grandfather, a fighter in the Resistance, "just in case": authorities used to be quite strict on the matter but the attitude has much changed and now they just play along when a cache is discovered.

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"Louhi spoke in riddled tones of three things to achieve: find and catch the Devil's Moose and bring it here to me. Seize the Stallion born of Fire, harness the Golden Horse. He captured and bound the Moose, he tamed the Golden Horse. Still there remained one final task: hunt for the Bird from the Stream of Death"

-Kalevala, Rune XIII-


BaronIveagh's picture
BaronIveagh
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Mauro wrote: I would take
Mauro wrote:

I would take any news regarding heavy weaponry from the former Soviet Bloc cum grano salis. For example a few years ago a farmer in Slovakia "discovered" an 88mm Flak in his backyard which was promptly auctioned off to eager collectors for a ridicolous sum of money. Needless to say nobody knew where it had been for sixty years, maybe it just appeared there one morning out of the blue, an incredible feat of telekynesis or materialization since that gun weighs several tons. Or maybe the fact that the farmer could sell its prize without fear of being squeezed by local authorities and the fact that he now owned a powerful tractor are the correct answers...
I would also add that in Continental Europe "discovering war relics" is a pretty common way of getting rid of old weapons that were hidden at the end of the war by, say, your grandfather, a fighter in the Resistance, "just in case": authorities used to be quite strict on the matter but the attitude has much changed and now they just play along when a cache is discovered.

Oh, I agree.  There have been quite  few WWII aircraft that have suddenly come on the market from former eastern block countries for those same reasons. 

The story I was refering to was from Archeology Magazine, though in all honesty I forget what month, it was a year or so ago, I think.  The largest peice I've heard about was from France, the turret of a sunken King Tiger had caused damage to a road that had been built over it, and then some consternation among the road crew that found it.  As I recall they reburied it and raised the road slightly.

Remember, tanks and such weigh many tons and can sink fast in soft soil.  When that same soil dries up in a drought, the objects in it rise due to the contraction of the soil. 

What was unusual is that it happened in some many places over such a broad area in a short space of time.

Summum Nec Metuam Diem Nec Optima

forester
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Battle of Lansdown 1643

Today is the anniversary of the Battle of Lansdown - 5th July 1643 - and I've just got back from a visit to the battlefield.  I experienced something very strange and wonder if anyone else has ever experienced the same.  I was standing reading one of the information boards behind the wall which sheltered the Parliamentary lines when I heard a drum in the distance.  The battle apparently began at 3 o'clock in the afternoon and the first time I heard the drum was at about 2.40pm.  It was (this is the easiest way I can explain!) rat-a-tat-tat, rat-a-tat-tat, rat-a-tat-tat-tat-tat-tat.  I turned round expecting to see a troop of the Sealed Knot doing their thing  . .but nothing (and you can see for a a very long way!  I had also emailed the Sealed Knot a few weeks ago to see if they were doing any sort of memorial.re-enactment etc but they weren't.   I carried on with the battlefield walk and heard the same drum beat several more times.  I went looking for a re-enactment group or whatever, got in the car and drove around  . . . but nothing.  It was most definitely a drum, a very tight, high sort of sound.  It's very difficult to descibe sound but I'm sure you can understand.  I know I wasn't "hearing things"  . . . .  I definitely heard a drum  . . . .

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Daniel Parkinson
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forester wrote:  It was
forester wrote:

  It was most definitely a drum, a very tight, high sort of sound.  It's very difficult to descibe sound but I'm sure you can understand.  I know I wasn't "hearing things"  . . . .  I definitely heard a drum  . . . .

Probably a snare drum by the description, not sure if they used these in the time frame/re-enactment, but from playing in a band that's what a snare sounds like.

forester
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Yes, I would describe it as

Yes, I would describe it as like a snare drum,  I wasn't a deep sound such as you get from big kettle or bass drums.  . . .  but there was no-one around! 



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