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City of London Gazetteer

Aldgate Underground Railway Station

Aldgate Railway Station which serves the Circle Line and Metropolitan Line opened on 18 November 1876 and is said to have been built on a Plague Pit where hundreds of victims of the Bubonic Plague of 1665 were buried. Daniel Dafoe mentions this ‘terrible pit’ in the churchyard of the Parish of Aldgate in his ‘A Journal of the Plague Year’ published 1722*. Read More »

Alice Hackney and St.Mary-at-Hill

St Mary at Hill

St Mary-at-Hill is a Grade I listed building on Lovat Lane. The founding of the church dates from 12th century though it has been rebuilt and renovated many times since then. It was during one period of renovation that it became linked with Alice Hackney who’s body was found preserved after being buried for nearly two hundred years. Alice also reputedly haunts the church still. Read More »

The Bank of England and The Black Nun

Sarah Whitehead

The Bank of England on Threadneedle Street is sometimes referred to as ‘The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street’ and is reputedly haunted by the apparition of Sarah Whitehead, also known as ‘The Black Nun’. Read More »

Bank Underground Railway Station

Bank Station

The Bank-Monument Station complex is comprised of the two interlinked underground stations of Bank and Monument. The complex is the eighth busiest station on the London Underground network and it serves the Waterloo & City Line, Central Line, Northern Line, Circle Line, District Line and the Docklands Light Railway. Read More »

Branwen The Daughter Of Llyr

Branwen The Daughter Of Llyr is part of The Mabinogion. The following is taken from Lady Charlotte Guest's translation which was published in 1877. Read More »

Christ Church, Greyfriars

Christchurch

There is a tradition that during the Victorian times a Night Watchman came across the ghosts of two beautiful ladies in the ancient burial ground of Greyfriars. The two ladies had haunted the site oblivious of each other for centuries, but, once they noticed each other and saw that they were of equal beauty, they got angry and started to fight. Read More »

Ghost Finder London - App

Ghost Finder London - Logo

Looking for the spookier side to London? Then this is the must-have app for you...

London has a rich haunted heritage, and from well-known ghosts to some of the more obscure, this app features over 300 haunted locations around the city, the map uses your phone's GPS to bring the spooks to you! Read More »

Haunted London Underground, by David Brandon & Alan Brooke

Haunted London Underground, by David Brandon & Alan Brooke

Over the past 147 years, the London Underground network has grown to cover 253 miles and 270 stations, covering most of central London, extending out into Greater London and beyond. Read More »

Here Is The Story Of Llud And Llevelys

The Story of Llud and Llevelys appears in the The Mabinogion and here is the translation published by Lady Charlotte Guest (1877). Read More »

King Lud & Ludgate

Ludgate is commonly accepted as having been named after the mythical King Lud, who according to legend founded London. King Lud who is said to have been buried at Ludgate appeared in texts such as Geoffrey of Monmouths (born circa 1100 – died circa 1155) Historia Regum Britanniae (The History of the Kings of Britain). Read More »

Liverpool Street Underground Railway Station

Receiving roughly 123 million visitors per annum, Liverpool Street Station is considered to be the third busiest station in the United Kingdom. It is built on the site once occupied by the original Bethlem Royal Hospital (Bedlam) and is reputedly haunted by an ex-patient of the infamous asylum. Read More »

Old London Bridge

London Bridge

Around the area where the old London Bridge stood there is a tradition that ghostly cries for help can be heard as if people are drowning in the River Thames. This dates back to a dark time in English history and the cries are thought to be those of a group of Jews that were tricked by a ships captain in 1290. Read More »

Old Red Cow, Smithfield

The Old Red Cow (or Ye Olde Red Cow as it was known) is considered to be one of Smithfield’s oldest pubs, though its current building dates from 1854. It is said that the apparition of a former landlord, sometimes referred to as Dick O’Shea, was seen in the year following his death (1981) sitting watching customers from an upstairs balcony.

Puddle Dock 1674

In 1674 a publication entitled ‘News from Puddle-Docke in London, or, A Perfect particuler of the strange apparitions and transactions that have happened in the house of Mr. Edward Pitts next door to the still at Puddle-Dock’ was printed. As the title suggests it concerned the reported haunting Edward Pitts home. Read More »

Smithfield Horned Figure (17th Century)

The sale of meat at Smithfield can be traced back over 800 years and in the 17th century an apparition of a horned figure reputedly terrorized the area leaping over the butchers stalls. When some of the butchers hit the figure with their cleavers and knives the blades apparently they passed straight through him without leaving a wound.

St Batholomew the Great Parish Church

Rahere

Founded in 1123 by Rahere, a jester/minstrel in the court of King Henry I (1068 – 1 December 1135), making this one of the oldest churches in London. Originally established as an Augustinian Priory Church, its nave was demolished in 1539 when King Henry VIII ordered the Dissolution of the Monastery’s. Read More »

St Botolph's Church without Bishopgate

St Botolph Picture

In 1982 Chris Brackley took a famous photograph whilst he was in St Botolph’s Church. The photograph was of the interior of the church, taking in the aisle, altar and main stain glass window. In the upper right hand side of picture there appears to be ghostly image of a figure dressed in period costume in the Choir Loft. Read More »

St James's Church Garlickhythe

St James's Church Garlickhythe

St James's Church Garlickhythe is an ancient church that was destroyed during the Great Fire of London of September 1666 and rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren (opening on 10 December 1682, though the tower was not finished until 1717). Read More »

St Magnus the Martyr Church

St Magnus the Martyr

St Magnus the Martyr was the second church to be damaged during the Great Fire of London in 1666 and was subsequently rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren (born 20 October 1632 – died 25 February 1723) at a cost of £9,580. Read More »

The Elms, Smithfield

Anne Askew

Smithfield haled a fairly prominent place in medieval London. Not only was it the site of a famous market and a place where Royalty held their tournaments, the Elms at Smithfield was also well known as a place of execution and it is thought that some of those who were cruelly killed at this spot may haunt it still. Read More »

The London Stone

London Stone (4)

Mounted behind an iron grill in the wall of 111 Cannon Street (originally known as Candlewick Street) can be found what could be described as one of London’s most ancient monuments, The London Stone (also known as The Brutus stone). Read More »

The Parish Church of St Michael, Cornhill

St Michaels’ Church in Cornhill is a Grade I listed building, built by Sir Christopher Wren between 1699 and 1672 following the destruction of the earlier medieval church in the Great Fire of London. It was in this now lost medieval building that according to legend a creature was encountered by the bell ringers early in the first half of the sixteenth century. Read More »

The Tower of London

Tower of London

The first structure on the site was a motte-and-bailey castle, which was started not long after William the Conqueror became king in 1066, the castle was built on the old Roman walls, which once formed the corner of Londinium. The first stone building on the site was the White Tower, which was commissioned by William the Conqueror in 1078 and completed in 1097. Read More »

Ye Olde Cock Tavern, Fleet Street

Ye Olde Cock Tavern is a Grade II listed building dating from 1887 and can be found at 22 Fleet Street. The original Ye Olde Cock Tavern was built in the 17th century and used to be on the opposite side of the road. Read More »

City of London Business Directory

The Dolphin Hotel, Littlehampton

Ellie and Katie along with their staff have created a warm and friendly pub with a traditional feel and traditional values. They have worked hard to turn the Dolphin into one of the safest, cleanest and most welcoming pubs around. Between them they have nearly 30 years experience in the pub and catering trade. Read More »



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