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King Arthur Gazetteer



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King Arthur Gazetteer

Alderley Edge

Alderley Edge Carving

Alderley Edge has been a sacred site for many thousands of years and has many legends attached to it. King Arthur and his men are said to sleep somewhere beneath the sandstone cliffs. Read More »

Arthur’s Stone

Arthur’s Stone is the name given to the remains of a Neolithic chambered tomb. Aged around 5000 years old (3700BC – 2700BC), the monument consists of a huge cap stone weighing over 25 tonnes and nine upright stones. Read More »

Badbury Rings

Badbury Rings Hillfort

This concentric ring hillfort dates from the Iron Age, and according to archaeologists was built to stem an invasion from the Northeast of the country. Read More »

Bathampton Down & The Battle of Badon Hill

It is thought by some that Bathampton Down and it's Iron Age hillfort, Bathampton Camp, may have been the location for the early 6th century legendary Siege or Battle of Badon Hill (also known as the Battle of Badon or the Battle of Mount Badon), in which King Arthur’s Britons halted the advance of the Saxons into Britain. Read More »

Bedd Arthur

The whole area around Dyfed is associated with Arthur, outlined in the old Welsh tales now part of the Mabinogion. This cairn on the hilltop is thought to be Arthur's Grave.

Directions: The grave is in the Prescely Mountains

Belenos (Belinus, Beli)

A Solar deity, he can be seen as a Celtic equivalent of Apollo, and there are various traces of his cult in Britain. In Irish mythology he was Bile, a powerful god of the underworld. Read More »

Birdoswald Roman Fort

Birdoswald Roman Fort

This impressive site is the remains of a Roman fort on Hadrian's Wall. The area was occupied from much earlier times and recently a Neolithic burial has been found. There is also evidence of a large Dark Age Hall on the site. Traditionally the site has been identified with Camlan, the site of King Arthur's last battle. Read More »

Blencathra Mountain (The Saddleback)

Blencathra Mountain (Saddleback)

This mountain is one of the locations associated with an army of sleeping knights, this time King Arthur and his men, waiting for the call to arms when he is most needed. In old Cumbrian, Blencathra means 'Devils Peak'

Directions: A footpath leads to the hill from Blencathra Centre. Read More »

Bosherton Lake

The local lake is said to have been the body of water into which Arthur's sword Excalibur was cast after the battle of Cammlan.

Directions: A footpath from Bosherton leads to the lake Bosherton reached off the B4319 South of Pembroke

Bran The Blessed

A Welsh and Irish god of giant size who was the son of the sea god Mannannan Mac Lir.

Bran had many heroic episodes, but was fatally injured during an excursion to Ireland to rescue his sister Branwen. Mortally wounded in the foot with a poisoned spear, he ordered his companions to take his severed head to the White Mount, where the Tower of London now stands. Read More »

Brent Knoll

The hill, which was once and Iron Age hillfort, is associated with an Arthurian Legend, and was the abode of three fearsome giants. Read More »

Cadbury Castle

This large hillfort has a plethora of traditions attached to it, most notably that it is the site of the legendary Camelot, the stronghold of Arthur. There is a distinct possibility that the historical Arthur - probably a sixth century war leader - had his base here, as the Iron Age hillfort was reoccupied and refortified around this time. Read More »

Caerleon Amphitheatre

Arthurs Round Table

This is the best example of a Roman amphitheatre in Britain. Until 1926 when serious excavations were undertaken at the site, it was considered to be a circular earthwork and linked to the legend of King Arthur being known as his Round Table. Read More »

Carn March Arthur

A rock overlooking the Dovey Estuary, on a hill above the A493, bears a depression that is said to be the hoofprint of Arthur's horse.

Directions: The rock lies above the A493.

Carreg Arthur (Arthur’s Rock)

Carreg Arthur is the name given to a hefty volcanic boulder estimated to be about 450 million years old that stands in a scenic area of North Wales to the south of Llanrug. Read More »

Chance To Be Part Of Project Albion

ASSAP (The Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) in partnership with Mysterious Britain & Ireland is opening up its long running Project Albion to enable members of the public to directly contribute towards it. Read More »

Cors-y-Gedol Burial Chamber

Cors Y Gedol Burial Chamber

The Cors-y-Gedol burial chamber which still has it's capstone intact is also referred to as Arthur’s Quoit and can be found close to some ancient hut circles known as the Irishmen’s huts on the slope of Moelfre. Read More »

Dozmary Pool

Dozmary Pool

Dozmary Pool is associated with many legends. It is suspected of being the body of water into which Sir Bedivere threw Excalibur after King Arthur was mortally wounded. The pool is also said to be a haunt of the Lady of the Lake, guardian of Excalibur. It is also said to be bottomless and to have a tunnel connecting it to the sea. Read More »

Eamont Bridge and Arthur's Round Table

Arthurs Round Table

Two prehistoric henge monuments have become known as Arthur's Round Table, a common theme in folklore were ancient structures become romanticised into legendary sites.  A cave near Eamont Bridge called giants cave is associated with two legendary giants called Tarquin and Isir. Read More »

Eildon Hill

Eildon Hill

Eildon Hill is a triple peak that dominates the landscape around Melrose in Southern Scotland. The hillfort was occupied in pre-historic times, was used as a signal station by the Romans, and was re-occupied during the Romano-British period. It is associated with the legendary wizard Michael Scot, and the ballad of Thomas the Rhymer. Read More »

Gawain and The Green Knight

The story of Gawain and the Green Knight, follows a theme that is to be found in other Celtic myths, and is typical of the supernatural testing of warriors. The beheading challenge is a common folklore motif, and can be found in the tales of Cuchulian the hound of Ulster. Read More »

Geoffrey of Monmouth's Arthur

A brief run through of Geoffrey of Monmouth's version of the Arthurian legend from 'The History of the Kings of Britain'. Read More »

Geraint The Son Of Erbin

Geraint The Son Of Erbin is a tale from the Mabinogion. The following translation by Lady Charlotte Guest was published in 1877. Read More »

Glastonbury

Glastonbury Tor Landscape

Glastonbury has been identified with the mysterious Isle of Avalon from the twelfth century, its past has become steeped in myth and legend, and it is probably most famous for its Arthurian and early Christian traditions. Read More »

Glastonbury Abbey, Arthur's Grave

Arthur's Cross

This is a reproduction of the cross said to have been found in Arthur's grave at Glastonbury Abbey. The actual grave seems to have been a very early burial but the Arthur link is tenuous. The actual cross disappeared many years ago and the only depiction is from a drawing by William Camden in 1607, from which this picture has been redrawn. Read More »

Glastonbury Arthur's Avalon

Arthur's Cross

Beside the main roads leading into the dreamy Somerset town of Glastonbury, are a series of signboards welcoming all to 'The Ancient Avalon', and causing a nationwide controversy. Glastonbury claims to be Avalon, to be the final resting place of King Arthur, and the site to which the Holy Grail was borne to by Joseph of Arimethea. Read More »

Kilhwch and Olwen or the Twrch Trwyth

The following is the tale of Kilhwch and Olwen or the Twrch Trwyth as told by Lady Charlotte Guest in her 1877 translation of The Mabinogion. Read More »

King Arthur

King Arthur

The legend of Arthur is one of the most popular and well known of British legends. From early brief passages to the mythic epic we know today, the story of Arthur has long been a source of inspiration to writers, poets and artists. He has become associated with hundreds of places in the British Isles and France, some of which will be listed in the gazetteer section in the coming months. Read More »

King Arthur's Well

King Arthur’s Well is so called, because of the myth connected with it, that the waters derive from King Arthur’s kitchen, and the fat from the meat that was cooked there, floats to the surface at the well. In 1853 a physician from Caernarfon named A. Read More »

Land's End

Beyond Land's End stretching to the Isles of Scilly, the lost land of Lyonnesse is reputed to lie. The land is said to have been engulfed by the sea over 900 years ago.

According to tradition the only survivor of the sinking was a man called Trevilian, who rode a white horse before the waves. The family crest shows the image of this white horse. Read More »

Llyn Barfog (The Bearded Lake)

Llyn Barfog is situated in high countryside above the northern banks of the River Dyfi. The lake is isolated, small, and covered with yellow water lilies in the summer. Sir John Rhys in Celtic Folklore suggests that it was originally called Llyn-y-Barfog (The Bearded One’s Lake) referring to some ancient mythical being who would have lived there. Read More »

Llyn Cau

Llyn Cau

The glacial lake of Llyn Cau at Cader Idris is said to be bottomless and according to tradition it is thought to be the home of a lake monster responsible for drowning a man who went swimming in the cold waters. Read More »

Llyn Llydaw (Brittany Lake)

At 1,430 feet above sea level Llyn Llydaw (Brittany Lake) is another sterile glacial lake of Yr Wyddfa (Mount Snowdon) in its eastern valley Cwn Dyli. It has an industrial air about it, and it has the Miners’ track crossing its eastern end by a causeway that was built in 1853 when the lake was lowered. Read More »

Llyn Ogwen

Llyn Ogwen

Four miles North from Capel Curig along the A5; and at 310 metres above sea level you’ll find Llyn Ogwen covering an area of 78 acres. Its ancient name was reportedly Ogfanw (young pig); and it is one of the shallowest lakes in North Wales, averaging 6 feet, and only being 10 feet at its deepest point. Read More »

Lochmaben Stane (Stone)

The Lochmaben Stane (or Lochmabenstane, Lochmabenstone, Clochmabenstane, Old Graitney Stone, Lowmabanstane, Loughmabanestane) stands in a farmers field near where the Kirtle Water enters the Solway Firth. Made if granite, it measures 7-8 feet in height and has a girth between 18 and 21 feet (depending upon your source). Read More »

Loe Pool

The Pool has a King Arthur legend, and along with Dozmary pool is supposedly the body of water from which he received Excalibur from the lady of the lake.

A high bar of shingle, called Loe bar separates the pool from the sea. Jan Tregeagle is supposed to have been tripped by demons while engaged in one of his tasks. He dropped a sack full of sand and created Loe Bar. Read More »

Maen Huail

Maen Huail

Situated outside Exmewe House (currently Barclays Bank) in Ruthin, is a large boulder that was reputedly used by King Arthur as a chopping block when he killed a love rival. The story states that King Arthur and Huail (son of Caw) once fought over the favours of a lady. Read More »

Mancunium Roman Fort, Castlefield

The remains of the Roman fort named Mancunium date from AD79 and can be found at Castlefield in Manchester. Read More »

Pendragon Castle

Pendragon Castle

Pendragon Castle is associated with an Arthurian legend. It is said that Arthur's father, Uther Pendragon tried to re-route the river Eden to create a moat for the castle.

The ruin dates to the 1100's and was built by Hugh de Morville one of the knights who killed Thomas of Cantebury, so is out of the time scale for King Arthur. Read More »

Peredur The Son Of Evrawc

Peredur The Son Of Evrawc is one the tales in the Mabinogion. This English translation by Lady Charlotte Guest was published in 1877. Read More »

Richmond Castle

The castle is one of many sites associated with Arthur and his sleeping knights, ready to stir from their slumber in a cave under the castle in times of need. A potter called Thompson once found his way into the cavern (or was shown into the cavern by a stranger) via a tunnel from the castle. Read More »

Ruthin Castle

Castle Entrance

Before I begin I would like to say that I spent my honeymoon at Ruthin Castle, and found the accommodation and service exemplary. I would recommend staying in the castle to anybody, and I cannot overstate how much I enjoyed the Medieval Banquet which they host on a regular basis. Read More »

Snowdon

Snowdon 1

Standing 3650 ft above sea level, Snowdon is the highest peak in Wales, second highest mountain in Britain and is also probably the busiest due to it popularity with hillwalkers. Read More »

St Govan's Chapel

This tiny chapel hidden in a deep ravine in the rocks dates from the thirteenth century. There may have been a chapel or religious structure here in the fifth century making it one of the earliest places of Christian worship. It has been suggested that the chapel was part of a larger Hermitage but its history is unclear. Read More »

St Michael and All Angels Parish Church, Arthuret

Though the current Gothic style church dates from 1609, the parish had a church dating from 1150, served by Jedburgh Abbey's monks and it is thought that there was a church on the site as early as the 6th century. Back in the 16th century this area on the border of Scotland between the Solway Firth and Langholm was known as the debatable lands and populated by the Border Reiver families. Read More »

St Non's Chapel and St David's Peninsula

St David's Peninsula is supposedly the landing place of Twrch Trwyth, the magical boar told in the story of Culhwch and Olwen in the Mabinogion, King Arthur features heavily in the story. It is also the place where St Patrick is said to have sailed for Ireland to convert them to Christianity. Read More »

St. Tydecho Stone

In the village of Llanymawddwy, there is an ancient church dedicated to St. Tydecho, thought to be the son of Anna Pendragon, King Arthur’s sister. Wirt Sykes in British Goblins (1881) gives the following tale of St. Tydecho and a blue stone. ‘There was a stone in the valley of Mowddwy, which did good service for the church. A certain St. Read More »

The Bridal of Triermain (1813) by Sir Walter Scott

I.
Come Lucy! while 'tis morning hour
       The woodland brook we needs must pass;
So, ere the sun assume his power,
We shelter in our poplar bower,
Where dew lies long upon the flower,
       Though vanish'd from the velvet grass.
Curbing the stream, this stony ridge Read More »

The Dream of Rhonabwy

Lady Charlotte Guest published the first English translation of The Mabinogion and below is how the tale of The Dream of Rhonabwy appeaed in it [1877]. Read More »

The Lady Of The Fountain

The Lady Of The Fountain is one the tales in the Mabinogion. This English translation by Lady Charlotte Guest was published in 1877. Read More »

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