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Ardvreck Castle

This ruined castle on the shore of Loch Assynt, was originally built by the MacLeods. Read More »

Armboth House

Armboth House was haunted following the drowning of the households daughter on the night before her wedding day. It is said that bells could be heard, a ghostly dog could be seen swimming in Thirlmere Lake (where she was murdered) and reception meal places laid out by some spirit, all taking place on the anniversary of that fateful night, which just happens to be Halloween. Read More »

Arnos Manor Hotel, Bristol

Built as a home in 1760 by local merchant William Reeve, the seventy three bed-roomed Arnos Manor Hotel has a reputation of being haunted. The Arnos Manor has its own Chapel in which Nuns would ran a girls school. One of the reported ghost stories involves a nun who is suspected to have fallen pregnant. She reputedly committed suicide and was bricked up in a wall. Read More »

Ashintully Castle

The castle dates back to the 1500's, and was built as a fortified tower house by the Spalding family. Read More »

Ashley Hall

The Grade II listed Ashley Hall dates from the late 16th century and has been linked to stories of a ghostly White Lady. T Ottway, in his 'News from the invisible world: A collection of remarkable narratives on the certainty of supernatural visitations from the dead to the living (1853)' gives an account of a ghost at a place named Ashley Park. Read More »

Astley Castle

The ruined Astley Castle is a Grade II listed fortified manor house dating from the 16th century. The manor had belonged to the Astley family since the 12th century but passed to the Grey’s in 1420 when Joan de Astley, wife of Reginald Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Ruthyn (Born 1362 – Died 30 September 1440), inherited the estate of her father Sir William de Astley, 5th Baron Astley. Read More »

Aston Hall

Aston Hall

The origins of Aston can be traced back to before the Domesday Book (1086-7) which shows the manor named as "Estone". Before the Norman invasion Earl Eadwin held the manor, then by 1086 it was controlled by William FitzAnsculf. This eventually passed into the hands of John atte Holte through marriage in 1367. The Holtes remained at Aston for the following two centuries. Read More »

Athelhampton Manor

Athelhampton Hall

There are still parts of this manor dating back 500 years, it was occupied early in its history by the Martyn family from 1350 to around 1600. The Martyn family were devoutly catholic and may have hidden priests within the house during the time England was under protestant rule. Priest holes, which are small secret recesses within walls, have been found which attest to this. Read More »

Auchen Castle Hotel

Built by General Johnstone of Corehead, Auchen Castle Hotel is a Victorian mansion dating from 1849. General Johnstone, served under Sir Ralph Abercromby (Abercrombie) (Born 7 October 1734 – Died 28 March 1801) in Egypt against the French in 1801 and it is thought that the plantations on the estate were laid out to show the positions of units in the Battle of the Nile. Read More »

Auld 'Opper Of Raydale House

Raydale House is a 17th century building that has been largely rebuilt during the 19th century and, it was during the 19th century that it acquired a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

Bagdale Hall

Bagdale Hall

The hall is the oldest building in Whitby built in 1516. It is now a hotel said to be haunted by Browne Bushell, a former owner who was executed for piracy. He has been seen walking up the staircase, and has also been heard in the same place.

There has been other strange phenomena associated with the hall over the years, including poltergeist activity.

Bagley House

In Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain, By John H. Ingram, he mentions a paper by Miss Billington contributed to Merry England in 1883 concerning Bagley House near Bridport. The same article I am led to believe also appeared in the Dorset County Chronicle, August 1883. Her tale concerns Squire Lighte and his death. Read More »

Baker Street

It has been suggested that a phantom dog, a dachshund was seen on Baker Street for a few weeks after the actual dog pet had disappeared.

Baker Street Underground Station

The Baker Street Underground station was opened on 10 January 1863. In the North bound tunnel between the Baker Street and St John’s Wood underground stations, there is talk of a ghostly workman who had died there. Early this century one of the undergrounds track walkers is said to have reported hearing footsteps coming toward him whilst he was sat having a break. Read More »

Balgonie Castle

The castle was built by the Sibbald family in the 14th century, and was later in the possession of Sir Robert Lundie during the 15th century. Read More »

Ballechin House

Once the focus of a controversial investigation by the SPR (Society for Psychical Research), Ballechin House no longer exists in the form that it was back in 1897, at the peak of the alleged haunting. Read More »

Ballindalloch Castle

Ballindalloch Castle or the ‘Pearl of the North' is the family home of the MacPherson-Grants and has remained in their family since it was built in 1546. It is supposed to be haunted by General James Grant (1722-1806), first British governor of East Florida, veteran of the French war, Indian War and the American War of Independence. Read More »

Ballyheigue Castle

Designed by Richard Morrison in 1810, Ballyheigue Castle was a grand mansion and home of the Crosbie family. Now mostly a shell, surrounded by a golf course which opened in 1996. It ha been burned down twice, once by accident in 1840 and again on 27th May 1921 as part of the troubles and the destruction of buildings linked to British Imperialism. Read More »

Balornock Poltergeist (1974 – 1975)

The following article entitled ‘Noises in the night-and the suspect is a spirit’ was published in the Glasgow Herald on 17 January 1975.

Banging noises, terrified families……it’s all being blamed on a mischievous ghost. JOHN McKINLAY reports on the chaos in a Glasgow housing scheme which started with a weird tapping noise. Read More »

The Bank of England and The Black Nun

Sarah Whitehead

The Bank of England on Threadneedle Street is sometimes referred to as ‘The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street’ and is reputedly haunted by the apparition of Sarah Whitehead, also known as ‘The Black Nun’. Read More »

Bank Street, New York City

In 1951 Mr Harvey Slatin (an engineer) and his wife Yeffe Kimball (an artist) began renovations on their home in Bank Street, Greenwich Village. The property had been a large nineteen room boarding house which had been run by Mrs Maccario before the Slatin’s purchased it. Without lodgers, Mr and Mrs Slatin decided to make into a single family home again. Read More »

Bank Underground Railway Station

Bank Station

The Bank-Monument Station complex is comprised of the two interlinked underground stations of Bank and Monument. The complex is the eighth busiest station on the London Underground network and it serves the Waterloo & City Line, Central Line, Northern Line, Circle Line, District Line and the Docklands Light Railway. Read More »

Baoxie Plank Road

An ancient Chinese proverb states "The road to Sichuan is harder than climbing the sky". Certainly before the advent of modern roads and rail the Sichuan basin was impossible to reach without a long and dangerous journey through harsh mountains where cold, fatigue, hunger, bandits and wild animals waited for those entering the region. Read More »

Bardsey Island

Bardsey Island (P)

The island is also known as the island of the currents and the saints. There are said to be the graves of 20,000 saints interred on the island, and legend suggests that anybody buried here will not go to hell no matter how wicked his deeds. Read More »

Barmouth Poltergeist

The following account of a poltergeist in Barmouth appeared in an edition of Folk-lore (June 1892) and was also reproduced in Richard Holland's 'Haunted Wales: A Guide to Welsh Ghostlore' Read More »



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