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An Interview With Dr Jason Braithwaite

Dr Jason Braithwaite

We recently caught up with Dr Jason Braithwaite, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Birmingham with an interest in anomalous experience, hallucinations, and aberrations in self-consciousness. He also has a formidable reputation for being extremely well informed on matters of the brain / mind relationship, and high quality scientific research. Read More »

The Angel Hotel, Lymington

The pub is reputed to be haunted by two ghosts. One is the tall ghost of a seaman, dressed in a naval coat, and the other is thought to be that of a coachman, who is seen standing looking out of the kitchen window. The hotel was an old coaching Inn, and was used by the local shipbuilders as a hostelry.

Anna Maria Porter’s Experience, Esher

Anna Maria Porter

John Ingram in his ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain’ (1897) recounts a reported experience by the authoress Anna Maria Porter (also referred to as 'L'Allegra') (born 1780 – died 1832). Born in Durham and spending her earliest years in Edinburgh, Anna’s family moved to London sometime in the 1790’s. Read More »

Annan Castle

Annan Castle was the home of the Lords of Annandale, the de Brus family (later known as the Bruce family), before they moved to Lochmaben Castle. The move occurred after the River Annan flooded and damaged the motte and bailey castle's foundations. Read More »

Anne Blakemore & Tobias Gill (Black Toby)

On 24 June 1750, Anne Blakemore of Walberswick died. Her body was found on the Walks a mile west of Blythburgh and negro drummer named Tobias (Toby) Gill from the 4th Dragoons (Lieutenant General Sir Robert Rich's Regiment of Dragoons) was accused of her murder. The Dragoons had been based in that area to combat smuggling and Toby had been drunk near where Anne’s body was discovered. Read More »

Aokigahara Forest

Aokigahara forest lies at the foot of Mount Fuji and is reputed to be one of the most haunted locations in Japan and is probably the second most popular place in the world to commit suicide after the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. Read More »

Appuldurcombe House

Appuldurcombe Manor

Appuldurcombe House is the impressive shell of a grand 18th century baroque style stately home of the Worsley family. Read More »

Apsley House

The Grade I listed Apsley House or Number One, London, is the former home of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (Born 1 May 1769 – Died 14 September 1852) and is now a museum managed by English Heritage. Read More »

Ardoe House Hotel, Aberdeen

Said to be haunted by a white lady, the spirit of a former owner's daughter who committed suicide.

Ardrossan Castle

Ardrossan Castle

Ardrossan Castle sits in a prominent position on castle hill above the town and is now in a ruined and dangerous condition. The castle was important during the Scottish - English wars, and was scene to an infamous event known as Wallace's Larder. An English garrison was stationed at the Castle, and Wallace arranged a decoy fire in the village. Read More »

Ardvreck Castle

This ruined castle on the shore of Loch Assynt, was originally built by the MacLeods. Read More »

Armboth House

Armboth House was haunted following the drowning of the households daughter on the night before her wedding day. It is said that bells could be heard, a ghostly dog could be seen swimming in Thirlmere Lake (where she was murdered) and reception meal places laid out by some spirit, all taking place on the anniversary of that fateful night, which just happens to be Halloween. Read More »

Arnos Manor Hotel, Bristol

Built as a home in 1760 by local merchant William Reeve, the seventy three bed-roomed Arnos Manor Hotel has a reputation of being haunted. The Arnos Manor has its own Chapel in which Nuns would ran a girls school. One of the reported ghost stories involves a nun who is suspected to have fallen pregnant. She reputedly committed suicide and was bricked up in a wall. Read More »

Ashintully Castle

The castle dates back to the 1500's, and was built as a fortified tower house by the Spalding family. Read More »

Ashley Hall

The Grade II listed Ashley Hall dates from the late 16th century and has been linked to stories of a ghostly White Lady. T Ottway, in his 'News from the invisible world: A collection of remarkable narratives on the certainty of supernatural visitations from the dead to the living (1853)' gives an account of a ghost at a place named Ashley Park. Read More »

Astley Castle

The ruined Astley Castle is a Grade II listed fortified manor house dating from the 16th century. The manor had belonged to the Astley family since the 12th century but passed to the Grey’s in 1420 when Joan de Astley, wife of Reginald Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Ruthyn (Born 1362 – Died 30 September 1440), inherited the estate of her father Sir William de Astley, 5th Baron Astley. Read More »

Aston Hall

Aston Hall

The origins of Aston can be traced back to before the Domesday Book (1086-7) which shows the manor named as "Estone". Before the Norman invasion Earl Eadwin held the manor, then by 1086 it was controlled by William FitzAnsculf. This eventually passed into the hands of John atte Holte through marriage in 1367. The Holtes remained at Aston for the following two centuries. Read More »

Athelhampton Manor

Athelhampton Hall

There are still parts of this manor dating back 500 years, it was occupied early in its history by the Martyn family from 1350 to around 1600. The Martyn family were devoutly catholic and may have hidden priests within the house during the time England was under protestant rule. Priest holes, which are small secret recesses within walls, have been found which attest to this. Read More »

Auchen Castle Hotel

Built by General Johnstone of Corehead, Auchen Castle Hotel is a Victorian mansion dating from 1849. General Johnstone, served under Sir Ralph Abercromby (Abercrombie) (Born 7 October 1734 – Died 28 March 1801) in Egypt against the French in 1801 and it is thought that the plantations on the estate were laid out to show the positions of units in the Battle of the Nile. Read More »

Auld 'Opper Of Raydale House

Raydale House is a 17th century building that has been largely rebuilt during the 19th century and, it was during the 19th century that it acquired a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

Bagdale Hall

Bagdale Hall

The hall is the oldest building in Whitby built in 1516. It is now a hotel said to be haunted by Browne Bushell, a former owner who was executed for piracy. He has been seen walking up the staircase, and has also been heard in the same place.

There has been other strange phenomena associated with the hall over the years, including poltergeist activity.

Bagley House

In Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain, By John H. Ingram, he mentions a paper by Miss Billington contributed to Merry England in 1883 concerning Bagley House near Bridport. The same article I am led to believe also appeared in the Dorset County Chronicle, August 1883. Her tale concerns Squire Lighte and his death. Read More »

Baker Street

It has been suggested that a phantom dog, a dachshund was seen on Baker Street for a few weeks after the actual dog pet had disappeared.

Baker Street Underground Station

The Baker Street Underground station was opened on 10 January 1863. In the North bound tunnel between the Baker Street and St John’s Wood underground stations, there is talk of a ghostly workman who had died there. Early this century one of the undergrounds track walkers is said to have reported hearing footsteps coming toward him whilst he was sat having a break. Read More »

Balgonie Castle

The castle was built by the Sibbald family in the 14th century, and was later in the possession of Sir Robert Lundie during the 15th century. Read More »



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