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St Batholomew the Great Parish Church

Rahere

Founded in 1123 by Rahere, a jester/minstrel in the court of King Henry I (1068 – 1 December 1135), making this one of the oldest churches in London. Originally established as an Augustinian Priory Church, its nave was demolished in 1539 when King Henry VIII ordered the Dissolution of the Monastery’s. Read More »

St Botolph's Church without Bishopgate

St Botolph Picture

In 1982 Chris Brackley took a famous photograph whilst he was in St Botolph’s Church. The photograph was of the interior of the church, taking in the aisle, altar and main stain glass window. In the upper right hand side of picture there appears to be ghostly image of a figure dressed in period costume in the Choir Loft. Read More »

St Chad's Church, Saddleworth

St Chad's Church

Saddleworth church - dedicated to St Chad - has a legend associated with its location. It is said that the original site for the church was on nearby Brown Hill, but every night the stones were mysteriously moved to their present position. Eventually the builders gave up moving the stones back to Brown Hill, and built it where the stones were placed each night. Read More »

St Digain's Church, Llangernyw

St Digain's Church in Llangerny has a unique living ancient monument, a male yew tree that is possibly aged 4000 to 5000 years making it one of the oldest living organisms in the world. There is also a tradition associated with the church and All Hallows Eve when a spirit would reputedly announce the names of those about to die from the altar. Read More »

St George's Church, Gravesend

The original St George’s Church dates from 1497. Read More »

St Gwynog’s Church, Aberhafesp

St Gwynog’s Church in Aberhafesp currently dates from 1857 when the earlier church was rebuilt. Though the first parish registers date from 1578, there are records of a church here in Aberhafesp dating back to 1254. The church is dedicated to the 6th century Gwynog (Born 511 – Died 580), the son of Gildas. Read More »

St Ives Bay

A ghost ship seen off the coast, has been identified with the ship Neptune. Also a ghostly lantern light is said to haunt the shore. It is supposed to be the lantern of a woman who was shipwrecked here and lost her baby to the waves. She is constantly searching for her child. Read More »

St James's Church Garlickhythe

St James's Church Garlickhythe

St James's Church Garlickhythe is an ancient church that was destroyed during the Great Fire of London of September 1666 and rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren (opening on 10 December 1682, though the tower was not finished until 1717). Read More »

St James's Palace

John Ingram recounts the following experience with an apparition at St James's Palace, in his 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain (1897)'. Read More »

St James’s Park

St James's Park 1833

Dating from 1536, measuring 58 acres, St James’s Park, named after a thirteenth century leper hospital which was dedicated to St James the Less, is the oldest of the Royal Park’s in London and is reputedly haunted by a murdered headless woman in red. Read More »

St Lawrence's Churchyard, Ludlow

St Lawrences

This Norman church who's foundations date from 1100AD is supposedly haunted by an old woman, wearing a long robe and having grey hair. She moves through the churchyard between the graves and also near the rectory.  It has been suggested that she may be more popular on summer evenings. Read More »

St Machar's Cathedral

St Machar's Cathedral-09

Still referred to as a Cathedral, St Machar's has not held a Bishop's seat since the Reformation and is in reality a high kirk. Legend has it that St Machar was informed by God to find a place where a river bends like a bishops crozier and then to establish a church there. Hence in 580 St Machar founded his church in Aberdeen where the River Don flows upon such a route. Read More »

St Magnus the Martyr Church

St Magnus the Martyr

St Magnus the Martyr was the second church to be damaged during the Great Fire of London in 1666 and was subsequently rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren (born 20 October 1632 – died 25 February 1723) at a cost of £9,580. Read More »

St Mary's Bleeding Gravestone

St Mary’s Church is the last resting place of Richard Smith who was killed on 12th April 1727, aged 20 years old. A recruiting sergeant for the army had come to Hinckley and was informing a crowd of potential new soldiers about the virtues of taking the King’s shilling, when Richard started barracking him, making jokes and quips. Read More »

St Mary's Church, Ashwell

A headless ghost dressed in black is supposed to haunt the churchyard.

Directions:
Reached via a minor road off the A505 at Slip End.

St Mary's Naval Barracks, Chatham

St Mary's Barracks

The fortification of Chatham started in 1756 and was further improved between 1805 and 1812 in the face of French aggression and the Napoleonic War. Demolished in the 1960's, St. Mary’s Barracks dated from between 1779 and 1782 and was built to house the prisoners who were used to build fort. This of course included French prisoners. Read More »

St Mary’s Church, Wanstead

The current St Mary’s dates from 1787 and is a Grade I listed building designed by Thomas Hardwick. The earlier church stood 70’ south of the present building and was demolished when the newer church was completed in 1790. The later church does have some monuments inside it that were originally from the older one and according to tradition it may have a few apparitions as well. Read More »

St Michael and All Angels Parish Church, Arthuret

Though the current Gothic style church dates from 1609, the parish had a church dating from 1150, served by Jedburgh Abbey's monks and it is thought that there was a church on the site as early as the 6th century. Back in the 16th century this area on the border of Scotland between the Solway Firth and Langholm was known as the debatable lands and populated by the Border Reiver families. Read More »

St Nicholas Church, Alcester

Fulke Greville Tomb

Inside the Parish Church of St Nicholas in Alcester (parts of which date back to the 14th century) can be found the tomb of Sir Fulke Greville (Died 10 November 1559) and his wife Elizabeth Willoughby, 3rd Baroness Willoughby de Broke, de jure 11th Baroness Latimer (Born 1512 - Buried 15 November 1562) and it was beside this tomb, according to the Paranormal Database, that the apparition of the af Read More »

St Nicholas's Churchyard, Chiswick

St Nicholas's Church, Chiswick

St Nicholas’s Church on Church Street in Chiswick is reputedly haunted by two of Oliver Cromwell’s daughters and there is even a legend associated with the church suggesting that the Lord Protector himself may have finally found peace there. Read More »

St Non's Chapel and St David's Peninsula

St David's Peninsula is supposedly the landing place of Twrch Trwyth, the magical boar told in the story of Culhwch and Olwen in the Mabinogion, King Arthur features heavily in the story. It is also the place where St Patrick is said to have sailed for Ireland to convert them to Christianity. Read More »

St Osyth’s Fountain

Some wells in Britain are associated with the beheading of their patron saint, examples of which include the case of St Winifred, St Fremund, St Juthware and St Osyth. Read More »

St Tysilio's Church, Llandysilo

The Gothic St Tysilio's in Llandysilo dates from 1867 but is built on the foundations of a much earlier church. Thought to be founded by St Tysilio early in the 7th century there are records of a chapel here dating back as early as 1254 and 1291. It was probably this earlier building that was reputedly haunted by a spirit which was according to folklore exorcised. Read More »

St Vincent’s Church, Burton

St Vincents dates back probably to the Norman occupation with a church in Burton being recorded in the Domes Day Book of 1086 and the earliest recorded rector being Richard de Basingham in 1186. Read More »

The Stainton Ghost

The Cumberland News, 30/06/1999 had an article by Ruth Berry and Gill Hands about the Stainton Ghost. According to the story, a church or abbey once stood near the village and human bones were found among the ruins. During the reformation the land upon which this holy building stood fell into the hands of a certain baron, now nameless. Read More »



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