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Hauntings


Starving Rascal, Stourbridge

The Starving Rascal is named after an event in Victorian times which has had lasting repercussions. A beggar turned up at the pub during a particularly harsh winter to ask for some food and drink. He was cruelly turned away by the landlord. Before he died of exposure and malnutrition outside on the steps the beggar placed a curse on the pub. Read More »

Steeles Lane, Meopham

Anna Dubuis gave the following account of a haunting on Steele Lane in her 31 October 2012 article ‘The ghosts and legends of north Kent’ which appeared in the Gravesend Reporter. Read More »

Stevenson Street, North Shields

The following account first appeared in Catherine Crowe’s The Night Side of Nature, or, Ghosts and Ghost Seers (1848) and was repeated in The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain by John Ingham (1897). The case concerns a residential property being leased by Mrs L in the early 19th century. Read More »

Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow

The New Stobhill Hospital opened in 2009 replacing the pre existing Stobhill Hospital. This older hospital dated back to 15 September 1904, when it was officially opened as a Poor Law Hospital. Read More »

Stoneleigh Abbey

The Grade I listed Stoneleigh Abbey is country mansion dating from the 16th century, built in the grounds of a Cistercian Abbey which had been founded in 1154 and destroyed after the Dissolution of the Monasteries by King Henry VIII. ‘A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 2’ (1908) gives the following historical background of the Abbey. Read More »

Stowell Park

The Stowell Park Estate is a private agricultural and sporting estate owned by the Vestey family. The following account of a encounter with an apparition appeared in 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain by John Ingram (1897)'. Though the account does not refer to Stowell Park by name, rather as Chedworth, the 'seat of Lord Chedworth'. Read More »

Strachur Manse

In his 1897 book entitled ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain’, John Ingram gives the story of a haunt like experience at the Manse in Strachur. Read More »

Strada Restaurant, Bath

The Strada restaurant in Beau Nash House, Saint John's Place, Bath is beside the Theatre Royal and as the building name suggests it was lived in by the dandy Richard Beau Nash (Born 18 October 1674 – Died 3 February 1761). Read More »

Strange Mitcham by James Clark

Strange Mitcham

Strange Mitcham by James Clark was first published as a booklet in 2002 as part of ASSAP's (Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) Project Albion. It was updated and republished in 2011 giving James the opportunity to add a few more articles and further information. Read More »

Strange Project Albion

Project Albion is part of one of ASSAP’s longest running and most successful research endeavours and it has been likened to a Domesday book of the paranormal. It is an attempt to record the full spectrum of anomalies, past and present, within their geographical, as well as historical, context. Read More »

Strata Florida Abbey

The abbey was founded in early part of the 13th century by the Cistercian monks, and was one of the grandest in Wales at its height. It was seen as a centre of education and political activity. The abbey was destroyed during the reformation. Read More »

Stratford Tombstone Murder Ghost

I find it very distasteful when ghosts are identified as people who were killed in fairly recent events, especially as this could cause distress for the deceased's friends and family. I am therefore in two minds whether to mention this reputed haunting and I apologise if it upsets anyone. Read More »

Sun Inn, Saxilby

The Sun Inn at Saxilby probably dates from around the 18th century and is closely linked with a famous early 19th century murder, that of Mary Kirkham and it said that Tom Otter, the murderer, reputedly haunts the pub to this day. Read More »

Sundrum Castle

The castle is said to be the haunt of a Green Lady, a common legend in castles throughout Scotland. Read More »

Swains Lane

Dating from at least 1492 when it was referred to as Swayneslane, it was one of four old parallel pathways leading up to Highgate village. (The others being West Hill, Bromwich Walk (now disappeared) and Dartmouth Hill). Also known for a long time as Swines Lane, it passed between agricultural land giving access to the farms on either side of it. Read More »

The Swan Hotel, Telford

Haunted by Humphrey, the victim of a mugging in the 1800s. He was seen by the former cook, Mrs Peggy Sayer on the landing. He was described as wearing a thick leathery coat and trousers.

Swarkestone Bridge

Civil War Ghosts

At just under a mile in length, the Swarkestone Bridge over the River Trent was originally built in the 13th century and is the longest stone bridge in England. Being a strategic crossing it has been the focus of military action during both the Civil War and the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745 and it is suggested that perhaps some of the soldiers involved hunt the bridge still. Read More »

Swinsty Hall

Swinsty Hall dates from the 16th Century and can be found on the banks of Swinsty Reservoir (built 1874). Read More »

Sykes Lumb Farm

There is nothing now standing of Sykes Lumb Farm though it probably stood near to the present day Sykes Holt. The farm dated back to the the War of the Roses (1455 – 1485) and gained a reputation for being haunted by a boggart that guarded over a hidden treasure. The story has been published several times. Read More »

The Talbot Hotel, Oundle

The Talbot

The apparition of a lady in black is said to appear near a staircase in the 17th century Talbot Hotel. She is usually seen for a few seconds before vanishing. Read More »

Tancred Hospital

In the village of Whixley is a large house that once belonged to the Tancred family. The last heir to this family stated in his Will that he was not to be buried underground and instead that he was to be interred in the family home, which he was. His coffin became a point of local interest and speculation arose that his ghost must haunt the house, though there is no evidence of this. Read More »

Taunton Castle

Many places in Somerset have traditions and legends relating back to the Monmouth Rebellion of 1685, locally known as the 'Duking Days'. Many Somerset people were to suffer at the hands of the authorities after the failed uprising, and Taunton Castle was the scene for some of the trails of the Bloody Assizes, when hundreds of people were sent to the Gallows by Judge Jeffries. Read More »

Thainstone House Hotel, Inverurie

This 18th century mansion hotel set in 44 acres of meadows is said to be haunted by a Green Lady. She is the ghost of a former owner's daughter that died when thrown from her horse. Read More »

The A44 WWII Phantom Bomber

A WWII phantom bomber has been seen by independent witnesses on separate occasions whilst driving on the A44, probably in the vicinity of Eisteddfa Gurig Farm at the base of Pumlumon 2,467ft. The aircraft flies silently and low to the ground as if it is going to crash into a hill. Read More »

The Abbey Inn, Newlay

The Abbey Inn at 99 Pollard Lane has been described as one of Leeds most Haunted pubs. Dating from the mid 19th century, the Inn was also been used as a mortuary until the 1950s, which may explain to some why it seems to have numerous ghosts. Read More »



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