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Hauntings


The Dingle, Shrewsbury

Now an ornate pond in the civic gardens known as The Quarry, the Dingle is haunted by a ghost that was identified in the 1800s as Mrs Foxhall. She was burnt alive there in 1647 for the murder of her husband by poisoning.

The Duck, Aylesbury (Demolished)

The Duck public house closed in 2009 and was demolished the following year, so we will probably learn nothing anything new from this reputedly haunted building. Luckily the following article entitled 'Ghostly goings-on puzzle pub couple ' was published in the Bucks Herald on 18 February 2004. Read More »

The Duckworth Hall, Oswaldtwistle

John Fahey gave the following account of the haunting at The Duckworth Hall in his 30 October 2003 article entitled 'Spooky tales of a haunted Hyndburn' which was was published in the Accrington Observer. Read More »

The Dun Cow, Shrewsbury

This Inn was built by Roger de Montgomery in around 1085, making it one of the oldest in Britain. Reputedly haunted by a monk. Read More »

The Dylan Thomas Boat House

The Dylan Thomas Boat House is found in Laugharne, set at the foot of a cliff overlooking the Tâf estuary. Dylan Marlais Thomas (Born 27 October 1914 – Died 9 November 1953) lived in the house between 1949 and 1953 with his family. It is now a shrine to poet, and a popular tourist attraction for Carmarthenshire County Council receiving around 15,000 visitors a year. Read More »

The Eclipse Inn, Winchester

The Eclipse Inn dates from 1540 and over the past centuries the building has had many uses including a rectory, private residence, ale house (around 1750) and from the nineteenth century an Inn. Read More »

The Elephant & Castle, Amersham

Probably dating from the 17th century, The Elephant & Castle is another of Amershams reputedly haunted inns. In 2001 the following interview by Victoria Birch concerning the haunting appeared in the The Argus. Read More »

The Elms, Smithfield

Anne Askew

Smithfield haled a fairly prominent place in medieval London. Not only was it the site of a famous market and a place where Royalty held their tournaments, the Elms at Smithfield was also well known as a place of execution and it is thought that some of those who were cruelly killed at this spot may haunt it still. Read More »

The Embassy Of Finland, London

The Embassy of Finland at 38 Chesham Place dates from around the 1830s. It was not of course always an Embassy and has over the years been known by various names such as Belgrave House and Herbert House. It is from an early time, possibly when it was a private residence that the reputed haunting of the Embassy has its roots. Read More »

The Faenol Estate

The Faenol or Vaynol estate between Y Felinheli (Port Dinorwic) and Bangor, comprises of about 1,000 acres of land and has over thirty listed buildings on the grounds. The estate dates back to the Tudor period, and is enclosed by a wall which is seven miles long. Read More »

The Feathers Hotel

The Feathers

The Feathers Hotel is a beautiful seventeenth century building with a carved timber façade and a reputation of being haunted. It was originally built for an attorney called Rees Jones in 1619 and the Feathers name relates to the Ostrich Feathers that are part of the design in the exterior wooden façade. Read More »

The Flask Tavern

The Flask Tavern dates back to the 17th century and has served the likes of Karl Marx (born 5 May 1818 – died 14 March 1883), William Hogarth (born 10 November 1697 – died 26 October 1764) (painter) and Dick Turpin (born 1705 – died 7 April 1739) (highwayman) who is said to have been hidden there for a while. Read More »

The Garricks Head, Bath

The Garrick’s Head at 7-8 St. Johns Place, Bath can be found adjacent to the Theatre Royal and is Grade II listed. Read More »

The Gatehouse, Highgate

The Gatehouse

There were three main entrances each with a tollhouse leading into the Bishop of London’s Park of Haringeye and The Gatehouse was the tavern at the Highgate entrance. (The Spaniards Inn ,Newgate and East Finchley being the others). Read More »

The George and Pilgrim Hotel, Glastonbury

Known as the George before the 20th century, The George and Pilgrim dates from the 1430's* and was originally owned by the Abbots of Glastonbury Abbey until its dissolution in September 1539. Read More »

The George Inn, Bathampton

The Grade II listed George Inn on Mill Lane in Bathampton dates from the mid late 17th century and is thought to be haunted by Viscount John Baptiste Du Barry who was killed on Bathampton Down on18 November 1778 during the last legal duel in Britain. His mortally wounded body is said to have been brought into The George Inn where he finally died. Read More »

The Ghost Club - A History by Peter Underwood

The Ghost Club - A History by Peter Underwood

When I first heard that Peter Underwood had written a book on the history of the Ghost Club and I was told I would be sent a review copy I was really excited. I have a lot of respect for Peter Underwood and have been reading his books since I was old enough to hold a library card. Therefore he has been a huge inspiration for me from an early age. Read More »

The Ghost of Ann Walker

According to Arthur L Hayward's 'Lives of the most remarkable criminals: Who have been Condemned and Executed for Murder, the Highway, Housebreaking, Street Robberies, Coining or other offences' (1735), the ghost of Ann Walker named her murderer in the early 17th century.

An Account of the Conviction and Execution of Mr. WALKER, and MARK SHARP, for the Murder of ANN WALKER Read More »

The Ghost of Captain Davies, Nefyn

This is a ghost story from Nefyn, a town on the north coast of the Llyn peninsula with a strong sea faring tradition. One night, Captain Davies was apparently seen standing in the lamp light at the junction of Stryd Y Plas and Stryd Y Llan. Read More »

The Ghost of Dafydd Salusbury

The village of Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch, just off the A525 in Denbighshire has a rich history, and is also reputedly haunted. It is said that the ghost of Dafydd Salusbury has been seen galloping around the parish on a white horse at Midnight, and making terrible groaning noises. Salusbury was of local nobility, and was not liked by the local people, for his wicked ways.

The Ghost of John Chiesly

For three hundred years Dalry was reputedly haunted by the apparition of a screaming (and sometimes manically laughing) man with a bloody stump for his right arm. This ghost was known as ‘Johnny One-Arm’ or, more correctly John Chiesly. John was an unhappy husband who petitioned for a divorce in 1688. Read More »

The Ghost of Mae Nak

I recently watched a Thai ghost film called "The Ghost of Mae Nak" and decided to do some research on the legend behind the film, during which I found it interesting to note a slight similarity between this legend and "The Black Lady of Bradley Woods" despite the storie Read More »

The Ghostly Hand of Draycott

There is a story involving a ghostly hand that concerns the inheritance of Draycott Cerne Manor and arose when Sir Walter Long of Wraxall and Draycott Cerne (Born abt 1565 – Buried 30 October 1610) disinherited his eldest son and heir in favour of his eldest son by his second wife Catherine Thynne of Longleat. Read More »

The Globe Inn, Dumfries

Established in 1610, The Globe is traditionally haunted by a barmaid called Ann, who had an affair with Robert Burns. Burns made her pregnant and she bore him a child that she named Elizabeth. While Robert Burns was well known for his womanising ways it is not know if there is any truth in the story. Read More »

The Gloddaeth Ghost

The following extract concerning a ghost in Gloddaeth Wood (now Coed Gaer) appeared in 'Welsh folk-lore: a collection of the folk-tales and legends of North Wales' (1887) by Owen Elias. He obtained the story from Rev. Owen Jones of Pentrevoelas who was had received a first hand account from Thomas Davies of Tycoch, Rhyl, who appears in the tale. Read More »



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