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Hauntings


The New Crown Inn, Bath

The following historical description about The New Crown Inn at 21 Newbridge Hill and their reputed ghost can be found on their website.   Read More »

The New Inn, Gloucester

Dating from the mid 15th century, The New Inn is a Grade I listed building that originally served as hostelry for St Peter’s Abbey. In 1553 Lady Jane Grey (Born 1536 – Died 12 February 1554) was staying here when King Edward VI died. It was here that she was proclaimed Queen, a reign that lasted 9 days. Read More »

The Nun of Covent Garden

Covent Garden (or Convent Garden) was a 40 acre area owned by the Abbey of Westminster that was used as a market garden in the Middle Ages. It was managed through the issuing of leases by the Abbot of Westminster until the Dissolution of the Monasteries by King Henry VII between 1536 and 1541, when it was taken by the state and eventually passed into the private ownership of the Earl of Bedford. Read More »

The Old Black Lion, Northampton

This old public house has in the past been reputedly haunted with poltergeist type phenomena, with beer barrels that move. Phantom footsteps have also been heard moving around.

The Old Queen’s Head, Islington

The Old Queens Head

The Old Queen’s Head Public House (44 Essex Road) is a well known live music venue attracting world class bands and DJ’s, but this building that dates back to the early 19th century has a unique history and a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

The Old Rectory (Friary Court, Old Friary), Southfleet

Since the 1950s, the 14th century Grade II listed, Old Rectory on Hook Green Road has been divided into two residences, Friary Court and the Old Friary. The rectory, which had a reputation for being haunted in the 19th century, was probably built by Thomas de Alkham (Died 1356), rector of Southfleet from 1323 and the chancellor of Rochester Diocese from 1327. Read More »

The Old Rectory, Cheam

The Grade II listed Old Rectory on Malden Road in Cheam, dates from the early 16th Century and according to their website it is said to be haunted by around seven ‘shy’ ghosts. Read More »

The Owain Glyndwr Hotel, Corwen

Owain Glyndwr

Named after Owain Glyndwr the great Welsh hero who had strong connections with Corwen, this is probably one of the oldest hotel buildings in Wales dating back to 1329. The building was originally a monastery attached to the church behind and later a coaching inn. Read More »

The Palace, Kirkgate

Originally a merchants house built in 1741, The Palace had become a registered Inn by 1841, possibly due to the Beerhouse Act of 1830 which enticed private residences to be become public houses. Read More »

The Plough, Ormskirk

The following article by Jamie Bowman entitled 'Car crash awakens The Plough pub’s ghost according to landlady' was published in the Ormskirk Advertiser on 19 July 2012. Read More »

The Plough@Eathorpe

The Plough Inn (now The Plough@Eathorpe) is an 18th century coaching house situated on the Fosse Way, the Roman road that linked Exeter with Lincoln. There are stories associated with the pub being haunted. The outline of a figure is said to have been reported walking across the bar area and one member of staff is thought to have been poked in the shoulder whilst mopping the floor.

The Poplars, Deddington

There is an early mention of the house formerly known as Poplars having been haunted. This is included on the website just a piece of historical interest and to add to the geographical mapping of reported activity, old and young. Read More »

The Promenade Ghosts

Aberystwyth Promenade

In the 1960′s a young couple tragically drowned after becoming trapped by the high tide and rocks at the end of the promenade at the foot of Constitution Hill in Aberystwyth. The following account is from Phil Bishop and his wife who saw what might have been the ghosts of this couple whilst they were holidaying in Aberystwyth during 1971. Read More »

The Result Of A Curse

The following account of an apparition being witnessed outside an unnamed West End church appraed in The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain (1897) by John Ingram. Read More »

The Roebuck, Richmond

Dating from around 1730, The Roebuck public house can be found at 130 Richmond Hill, Richmond and is well known for the amazing views it provides of the River Thames below. In 1972 it was reputedly the scene of a haunting type experience. Guy Lyon Playfair gave the following account of the case in ‘The Haunted Pub Guide’. Read More »

The Rose & Crown, Hemel Hempstead

The Rose & Crown, Hemel Hempstead

The Rose and Crown in Hemel Hempstead was originally a butchers shop. In 1537 the owner is recorded as brewing mead for his workers. The ale business grew until it took over and the oldest ale house in the Old High Street, Hemel Hempstead began. Read More »

The Royal Oak, East Lavant

The 18th century Royal Oak public house and restaurant in East Lavant had a reputation of being haunted in the 1950’s. It has been suggested that the apparition of a bearded man has been seen in the back rooms and heard climbing the stairs during the evening. Read More »

The Royal Oak, St Neots

The Royal Oak no longer occupies 38 High Street in St Neots, but in 1963, Mr Hart the Landlord reported a strange and nasty smell that was considered to be paranormal in nature. Earlier in the in 20th century an exorcism was carried out in the building but the reason for it is unknown, though it can be assumed that the haunting went back many years.

The Royal Standard of England, Beaconsfield

Originally known as The Ship and dating from 1213, The Royal Standard of England on Brindle Lane, Beaconsfield is thought to be the oldest Free House in England and is reputedly haunted by two ghosts. Read More »

The Royal Victoria & Bull Hotel, Dartford

The Royal Victoria & Bull Hotel on High Street in Dartford is Grade II Listed and dates from 1703.  Originally it was a large coaching inn on the London to Canterbury and Dover road. Read More »

The Rufus Stone

Death of William Rufus

The Rufus stone (now encased in metal) erected by Earl De La Warr in 1745, marks the location where King William II of England (referred to as William Rufus due to his red faced complexion) died in a hunting accident on 2 August 1100. Some mystery still envelopes the events of his death. Read More »

The Salamander, Bath

Referred to locally as ‘The Sally’, The Salamander can be found at 3 John Street, Bath, a Grade II listed building dating back to 1736. Haunt like experiences have been reported here during this century at least, including unexplained footsteps and unaccounted for singing and talking being heard. Read More »

The Saracens Head Inn, Amersham

Two ghosts are thought to haunt this old 16th century coaching inn said to have been built from timbers taken from old ships. One of the ghosts is reputedly a serving wench dating from the 17th century and the second ghost, according to their website is a mystery.

The Screaming Skull of Burton Agnes Hall

The skull at Burton Agnes Hall is another famous screaming skull, although its exact whereabouts in the hall is unknown. It is thought to reside behind one of the walls, having been bricked up and forgotten about years before. Read More »

The Ship Inn, Oundle

The Ship Inn is a 14th century coaching house in picturesque Oundle. It supposed to be haunted by the ghost of a former landlord who committed suicide by jumping out of an upper story bedroom window, breaking his neck. His ghost has been encountered by several subsequent licensees and visitors to the Ship Inn alike.



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