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The Horror of Gyb Farm edited by Richard Holland

Gyb Farm

Within this book, The Horror of Gyb Farm, Richard Holland has collated and edited the works of a pioneering and yet relatively unknown paranormal researcher, Frederick George Lee (born 1832-1902). Between 1875 and 1894 F.G. Read More »

The John Snow, Soho

The John Snow public house at 39 Broadwick Street was named after Dr John Snow (Born 15 March 1813 – Died 16 June 1858), who traced the source of the Soho cholera outbreak of 31 August 1854 to contaminated water from a pump on Broadwick Street (known as Broad Street prior to 1936). Read More »

The Kings Arms, Peckham Rye

Kings Arms

132 Peckham Rye was once the address of The King’s Arms public house, which was hit by a bomb during a World War II German air raid I which eleven people lost their lives. The pub was rebuilt and overtime eventually became a nightclub named Kings on the Rye before finally being demolished in the late 1990’s by a block of flats. Read More »

The Kings Head Hotel, Cuckfield

The Kings Head Hotel is no longer open for business and the building has been changed into a residential mews (Kings Mews). However, this hotel which dated from at least 1832 (when Pigot's Directory of Sussex showed James Webber as the landlord) had a reputation of being haunted by a ghost known locally as Geranium Jane. Read More »

The Lake Vyrnwy Obelisk

The Lake Vyrnwy Obelisk

Lake Vyrnwy Dam and the associated waterworks was constructed in the 1880s to provide drinking water for Liverpool and Merseyside. Today the area is a nature reserve and conservation area popular with the many visitors who come to enjoy the magnificent scenery. Read More »

The Lamb Inn

The Lamb Inn

Demolished in 1905, The Lamb Inn became a centre of attention during the 18th century with an investigated and well reported poltergeist like haunting that lasted over a year. The Lamb Inn dated from 1651 and stood between Gloucester Land and Lawford Street. There is I believe nothing remaining of the old building now. Read More »

The Llandoger Trow, Bristol

Llandoger Trow

The Llandoger Trow is a fantastic looking building which dates from 1664 and can be found on King Street, across from the Theatre Royal in Bristol. The pub has a long tradition of serving those connected with the arts and the men who worked the sea. It also has a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

The Lookout Inn, Lawe Top

The Lookout Inn stands opposite the partially reconstructed Arbeia Roman Fort which dates from around 120AD and served as a maritime supply base for the garrisons on Hadrian’s Wall. We probably should not be surprised to hear of a Roman ghost haunting The Lookout Inn. Read More »

The Lord Eldon, Knutsford

The 300 year old Lord Eldon public house is thought to be haunted by the ghost of Annie Sarah Pollitt, daughter of James Pollitt the landlord of the Lord Eldon in the late 19th century.  She was also, in 1864 crowned the first May Queen of Knutsford’s famous Royal May Day fair. Read More »

The Maes-y-Neuadd Country House Hotel

This famous country house hotel situated between Harlech to the south, and Talsarnau to the north, just off the B4573 is reputedly a haunted house. The oldest part of the building dates from the 14th Century, and it was extended several times over the centuries, becoming a manor house. Now it is a first class hotel and restaurant. Read More »

The Manchester Arms, Hull

The following story entitled 'Ghost captured on video at Manchester Arms pub in Hull's Old Town' was published in the Hull Daily Mail on 9 November 2012.

WHEN the landlady calls time, she is the visitor who refuses to leave. Read More »

The Manor Castle, Sheffield

This pub sits in the grounds of the now ruined Manor Castle (or Manor Lodge) in Sheffield and is haunted by the apparition of a figure. When encountered by Jack Wright, the new Landlord he moved his family straight back out after three weeks of being continuously haunted, if not by seeing the figure then by feeling a presence. Read More »

The Marine, South Shields

On Thursday 14 June 2012, the following story by Mike Howell entitled ‘High spirits at South Shields pub’ was published in the Shields Gazette. ’THE Marine is no ordinary pub. Read More »

The National Railway Museum

The National Railway Museum is the worlds largest museum dedicated to rail travel and covers over 300 years of worldwide history. One of the many exhibits, a sleeping car, is supposed to be haunted by an unknown prescence.

The New Crown Inn, Bath

The following historical description about The New Crown Inn at 21 Newbridge Hill and their reputed ghost can be found on their website.   Read More »

The New Inn, Gloucester

Dating from the mid 15th century, The New Inn is a Grade I listed building that originally served as hostelry for St Peter’s Abbey. In 1553 Lady Jane Grey (Born 1536 – Died 12 February 1554) was staying here when King Edward VI died. It was here that she was proclaimed Queen, a reign that lasted 9 days. Read More »

The Nun of Covent Garden

Covent Garden (or Convent Garden) was a 40 acre area owned by the Abbey of Westminster that was used as a market garden in the Middle Ages. It was managed through the issuing of leases by the Abbot of Westminster until the Dissolution of the Monasteries by King Henry VII between 1536 and 1541, when it was taken by the state and eventually passed into the private ownership of the Earl of Bedford. Read More »

The Old Black Lion, Northampton

This old public house has in the past been reputedly haunted with poltergeist type phenomena, with beer barrels that move. Phantom footsteps have also been heard moving around.

The Old Queen’s Head, Islington

The Old Queens Head

The Old Queen’s Head Public House (44 Essex Road) is a well known live music venue attracting world class bands and DJ’s, but this building that dates back to the early 19th century has a unique history and a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

The Old Rectory (Friary Court, Old Friary), Southfleet

Since the 1950s, the 14th century Grade II listed, Old Rectory on Hook Green Road has been divided into two residences, Friary Court and the Old Friary. The rectory, which had a reputation for being haunted in the 19th century, was probably built by Thomas de Alkham (Died 1356), rector of Southfleet from 1323 and the chancellor of Rochester Diocese from 1327. Read More »

The Old Rectory, Cheam

The Grade II listed Old Rectory on Malden Road in Cheam, dates from the early 16th Century and according to their website it is said to be haunted by around seven ‘shy’ ghosts. Read More »

The Owain Glyndwr Hotel, Corwen

Owain Glyndwr

Named after Owain Glyndwr the great Welsh hero who had strong connections with Corwen, this is probably one of the oldest hotel buildings in Wales dating back to 1329. The building was originally a monastery attached to the church behind and later a coaching inn. Read More »

The Palace, Kirkgate

Originally a merchants house built in 1741, The Palace had become a registered Inn by 1841, possibly due to the Beerhouse Act of 1830 which enticed private residences to be become public houses. Read More »

The Plough, Ormskirk

The following article by Jamie Bowman entitled 'Car crash awakens The Plough pub’s ghost according to landlady' was published in the Ormskirk Advertiser on 19 July 2012. Read More »

The Plough@Eathorpe

The Plough Inn (now The Plough@Eathorpe) is an 18th century coaching house situated on the Fosse Way, the Roman road that linked Exeter with Lincoln. There are stories associated with the pub being haunted. The outline of a figure is said to have been reported walking across the bar area and one member of staff is thought to have been poked in the shoulder whilst mopping the floor.



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