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The George and Pilgrim Hotel, Glastonbury

Known as the George before the 20th century, The George and Pilgrim dates from the 1430's* and was originally owned by the Abbots of Glastonbury Abbey until its dissolution in September 1539. Read More »

The George Inn, Bathampton

The Grade II listed George Inn on Mill Lane in Bathampton dates from the mid late 17th century and is thought to be haunted by Viscount John Baptiste Du Barry who was killed on Bathampton Down on18 November 1778 during the last legal duel in Britain. His mortally wounded body is said to have been brought into The George Inn where he finally died. Read More »

The Ghost Club - A History by Peter Underwood

The Ghost Club - A History by Peter Underwood

When I first heard that Peter Underwood had written a book on the history of the Ghost Club and I was told I would be sent a review copy I was really excited. I have a lot of respect for Peter Underwood and have been reading his books since I was old enough to hold a library card. Therefore he has been a huge inspiration for me from an early age. Read More »

The Ghost of Ann Walker

According to Arthur L Hayward's 'Lives of the most remarkable criminals: Who have been Condemned and Executed for Murder, the Highway, Housebreaking, Street Robberies, Coining or other offences' (1735), the ghost of Ann Walker named her murderer in the early 17th century.

An Account of the Conviction and Execution of Mr. WALKER, and MARK SHARP, for the Murder of ANN WALKER Read More »

The Ghost of Captain Davies, Nefyn

This is a ghost story from Nefyn, a town on the north coast of the Llyn peninsula with a strong sea faring tradition. One night, Captain Davies was apparently seen standing in the lamp light at the junction of Stryd Y Plas and Stryd Y Llan. Read More »

The Ghost of Dafydd Salusbury

The village of Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch, just off the A525 in Denbighshire has a rich history, and is also reputedly haunted. It is said that the ghost of Dafydd Salusbury has been seen galloping around the parish on a white horse at Midnight, and making terrible groaning noises. Salusbury was of local nobility, and was not liked by the local people, for his wicked ways.

The Ghost of John Chiesly

For three hundred years Dalry was reputedly haunted by the apparition of a screaming (and sometimes manically laughing) man with a bloody stump for his right arm. This ghost was known as ‘Johnny One-Arm’ or, more correctly John Chiesly. John was an unhappy husband who petitioned for a divorce in 1688. Read More »

The Ghost of Mae Nak

I recently watched a Thai ghost film called "The Ghost of Mae Nak" and decided to do some research on the legend behind the film, during which I found it interesting to note a slight similarity between this legend and "The Black Lady of Bradley Woods" despite the storie Read More »

The Ghostly Hand of Draycott

There is a story involving a ghostly hand that concerns the inheritance of Draycott Cerne Manor and arose when Sir Walter Long of Wraxall and Draycott Cerne (Born abt 1565 – Buried 30 October 1610) disinherited his eldest son and heir in favour of his eldest son by his second wife Catherine Thynne of Longleat. Read More »

The Globe Inn, Dumfries

Established in 1610, The Globe is traditionally haunted by a barmaid called Ann, who had an affair with Robert Burns. Burns made her pregnant and she bore him a child that she named Elizabeth. While Robert Burns was well known for his womanising ways it is not know if there is any truth in the story. Read More »

The Gloddaeth Ghost

The following extract concerning a ghost in Gloddaeth Wood (now Coed Gaer) appeared in 'Welsh folk-lore: a collection of the folk-tales and legends of North Wales' (1887) by Owen Elias. He obtained the story from Rev. Owen Jones of Pentrevoelas who was had received a first hand account from Thomas Davies of Tycoch, Rhyl, who appears in the tale. Read More »

The Golden Fleece, York

The Golden Fleece is a Grade II listed building which claims to be York's most haunted pub. According to their website 'Possibly the most famous ghost is Geoff Monroe, a Canadian airman who was staying at the pub in room four when he died in 1945, by throwing himself or falling out of one of the windows. Read More »

The Golden Pheasant, Biggleswade

The Golden Pheasant at 71 High Street is a Grade II listed building dating from the 18th century. There have apparently been reports of the sound of singing coming from the bar when it is empty and footsteps again from an area with nobody present to make them.

The Grapes Hotel


In the village of Maentwrog on the A496, the Grade II listed Grapes Hotel is the local hostel. It was originally a 17th Century coaching inn but its cellar dates from the 13th Century. Read More »

The Grappa Wine Bar

The Grappa Wine Bar on Lansdown Road, Bath was originally a public house known as the Beehive which in the 1970’s had a reputation for being haunted by a friendly serving maid which the licensees referred to as Bunty. Read More »

The Grenadier, Knightsbridge

The Grenadier at 18 Wilton Row dates back to the early eighteenth century. Popular with Royalty and celebrities (King George IV, Madonna, Guy Ritchie and Gwyneth Paltrow) it was described by Guy Lyon Playfair in his Haunted Pub Guide (1987) as being “probably the most famous haunted pub in the world” and it is probably the one with its own sentry box outside. Read More »

The Greyhound and Punchbowl, Bilston

The Greyhound and Punchbowl is an ancient pub which has the unusual feature of a tree trunk in the middle of the pub. A number of figures have been sighted here. A tall man in a black cloak and large black hat has been seen around the kitchen area. When staff go to investigate further of course there is no one there. Read More »

The Griffin

The Griffin

The Griffin, built in 1679 was one of the first ships to sail on the Great Lakes and was used by the French Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle ( 22 November 1643 – 19 March 1687), to explore that part of Northern America. Read More »

The Hanbury Arms, Pontypool

The following two newspaper reports concerning strange experiences at The Hanbury Arms, Clarence Street, Pontypool were printed on 4 September 2012. The first, entitled ‘Ghostly goings on at Pontypool pub’ is by Natalie Crockett and appeared in the Gwent News. Read More »

The Highgate Vampire - How It All Began - by David Farrant

Highgate Cemetery

LONDON 1969, AND WIDE REPORTS WERE COMING INTO the British Psychic and Occult Society concerning a tall black apparition that had been seen lurking among the tombs of London's Highgate Cemetery. Most of these reports were from people who claimed to have been confronted by this apparition which invariably took the form of a tall dark figure and petrified people both in, or passing, the cemetery. Read More »

The Hog's Head, Wolverhampton

Hogs Head

The Hog's Head used to be known as The Vine. As far as is known there are two ghosts here. One is a train driver called Marber who was killed in the bombing during World War Two. He is apt to sit quietly at the bar before simply disappearing. Read More »

The Horns of Boningale

The Horns of Boningale boasts a number of ghostly presences within its walls. At one time Shropshire sheep drovers would stay in a bunkhouse at the inn which has now become the dining room. The story goes that a fight between two of the drovers resulted in the death of one of them. Since then, the apparition of a man dressed in a smock has been seen at times in the dining room. Read More »

The Horns, Crucifix Lane

Suchards Bar & Thai Restaurant can now be found at 2 Crucifix Lane. Before Suchards it was known the Czar Bar and before that The Horns public house. The Horns dates back to the Victorian era and appears in the 1869 Post Office Directory, but it was in the mid 1960’s that it got a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

The Horror of Gyb Farm edited by Richard Holland

Gyb Farm

Within this book, The Horror of Gyb Farm, Richard Holland has collated and edited the works of a pioneering and yet relatively unknown paranormal researcher, Frederick George Lee (born 1832-1902). Between 1875 and 1894 F.G. Read More »

The Hummums, Covent Garden

The following account was published in ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain’ by John Ingram (1897). Read More »



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