You are hereHauntings

Hauntings


Whitby Abbey

Whitby Abbey 2

Whitby Abbey is one of the most atmospheric locations in England. The desolate ruins stand stark above steep cliffs overlooking the old whaling village of Whitby in North Yorkshire, a testament to the town's former religious significance. Read More »

White Hart, Crystal Palace

On 4th March 2009 the following article by Jennifer Heape entitled ’ Crystal Palace pub's strange basement 'haunted by girl', appeared in the Streatham Guardian

Deep beneath the White Hart pub in Crystal Palace rumours of secret tunnels, hauntings and witchcraft abound. Read More »

The White Hart, Hemel Hempstead

The White Hart is said to be haunted by the ghost of a young man who was murdered while fighting off a press gang. He is thought to have died at the bottom of the stairs, where the figure of a man has been seen with a look of terror on his face.

White Lady of Shooters Hill

In the years around 1830 the area surrounding the Shooters Hill and the Well Hall Road junction was said to be haunted by strange “unaccountable noises” and the apparition of a white lady. The haunting was thought be some to be connected to the skeleton of an unidentified female skeleton unearthed by a labourer on 10 June 1844. The woman had a long golden hair and a fractured skull. Read More »

Whiteleas Ghost Plane

The following account of an experience with a phantom aircraft was published in the Shields Gazzette on Wednesday 4 February 2009 in an article entitled ‘Did Dougal see a ghost plane?’ Read More »

Whitmore Park Black Dog

According to ‘The Folklore of Warwickshire’ (1976) by Roy Palmer, a Black Dog ‘with a matted, shaggy coat and green eyes roams Whitmore Park at night. People avoid the area, since to see the dog means a death in the family’ It is thought that in 1949 this creature standing about six foot tall was seen on Watery Lane. Read More »

Widow Webb of Barby

In the late 19the century a house in the village of Barby had a reputation of being haunted by a widow who could not rest until her estate and debts were settled in full. Read More »

Wiestling Hall

The following article entitled ‘Spectral spectacles frequent Mont Alto Campus' concerning the haunting of Wiestling Hall, was written by Joelle Boll and featured in the The Daily Collegian, 31 October 1994. Read More »

Wig & Pen, Northampton

Back in 1892 when the Wig & pen was known as The Black Lion it shared a wall with a butcher's warehouse. This warehouse was the scene of a murder, when Andrew MacRae killed Annie Pritchard and her infant child. The torso and legs of Annie Pritchard were discovered in an old sack near Althorp Railway Station on 27th August 1892. Read More »

Wigginton Common

During the English Civil War, Wigginton Common served as camp for some of Cromwell's troops. They used it as a base from where they could bombard Berkhamstead castle. There have been reports of Roundheads, seen on the common in the evening at twilight as the light begins to fade. Read More »

Wight Beaches

Beaches from St Catherine's

The impressive swathe of scenic sands that form the Back of the Wight Beaches, were the scene of much of the smuggling that formed an additional revenue for many islanders during the 17th 18th and early 19th century. Read More »

Wilden and Ravensden

On a minor road between Wilden and Ravensden a strange figure dressed in black has been seen in broad daylight.

The figure has been identified as a witch with a malevolent character.

Directions: The haunted road is a minor road off the B660 between Ravensden and Wilden

William "Bill" Sketoe And The Hole That Won't Stay Filled

Lynchings were once unfortunately common throughout many parts of America. Although common perception associates lynchings with racist violence against black Americans, many other groups were also frequent targets of lynch mobs. These included criminals of any race, Hispanic people, Chinese people and Italians, as well as anyone who deviated from accepted social norms or expected behaviour. Read More »

William Ridgeway’s Experience (1814)

The following account of William Ridgeway’s (Born 1788 – Died 1864) strange experience was extracted from ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain’ (1897) by John Ingram. Read More »

Willington Mill

Owned by Unthank and Proctor, Willington Mill (Also known as Kitty's Mill) was built in 1805 and was one of the first steam powered corn mills in Europe. It is however the adjacent, yet separate Mill House that is of interest to this website as in the 19th century it developed a reputation as being very haunted. The story of the Willington Mill haunting has been retold many times. Read More »

Willy Wilcock's Hole

Willy Wilcock's Hole is a cave said to be haunted by a fisherman of the same name who was transported to the fairy kingdom. He is still searching his way home after all this time. On wild nights his cries can be heard mingling in the wind.

Wimbledon Common

Jerry Abershaw

Wimbledon Common, Putney Heath and Putney Lower Common form a large area of heath land measuring 460 acres with an estimated million trees. Read More »

Winnats Pass

This impressive limestone gorge is said to be haunted by a young couple called Clara and Henry who were murdered whilst eloping.

The pair were ambushed one night in 1758, robbed and killed, their bodies were found years later buried near a barn. Their remains were re-interred in Castleton churchyard. Read More »

Windsor Castle

Windsor Castle

The castle was built by William the Conqueror and has been part of royal life and intrigue for nearly a thousand years.

The castle has a menagerie of royal ghosts. Henry VIII haunts the cloisters of the castle, announcing his presence his lumbering footsteps and the wheezing of his breath. Read More »

Woburn Abbey

The abbey originally belonged to the Cistercians and was modernised in 1744, it has a multitude of ghost stories, many of them well authenticated.

Phantom monks have been seen in the Crypt area and in what is now the sculpture gallery. Read More »

Woodcroft Castle

The castle is haunted by the clash of steel and cries for mercy, said to originate from a civil war skirmish.

During the English civil war the castle provided a guerrilla base for Dr Michael Hudson, who organised a band of men to cause havoc with Cromwell's troops in the area. Eventually Cromwell's troops caught up with him and all his men were killed in a vicious battle. Read More »

Woodhouselee

On 23d January 1570, the Regent of Scotland, James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray (born 1531) was assassinated in Linlithgow by a sniper firing a 3’5” long, hexagonal bore barreled carbine from a house window. The assassin was James Hamilton of Bothwellhaugh the nephew of Archbishop John Hamilton, from who’s window he fired the fatal shot. Read More »

Woodminton

Patty's Bottom, a valley near Woodminton is described as being haunted by the tramping of feet and a headless horse as the site was the scene of a bloody battle between the Britons and the Romans.

Woodrow High House, Amersham

The Grade II listed Woodrow High House generally dates to the 18th century though incorporates the fabric of an earlier 17th century house linked to Oliver Cromwell. No longer a family home, Woodrow High House is now a residential training centre run by London Youth (Federation of London Youth Clubs), or should I say a reputed haunted training centre. Read More »

Workington Hall

Workington Hall

The ruined hall was once a magnificent fortified home belonging to the powerful Curwen family. It is said to be haunted by ghostly children and the Jacobite 'Galloping Harry Curwen' (Henry Curwen circa 1715). Read More »



Share/Save

Navigation

Recent comments

Featured Site