You are hereHauntings

Hauntings


Bowood House

Bowood House

In December 1772 the theologian and scientist Dr Joseph Priestley (born 1733 – died 1804) was appointed by Sir William Fitzmaurice/Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne (and from 1784 1st Marquis of Lansdowne) (born 1737 – died 1805) as his librarian, literary companion and tutor to his two sons. Read More »

Braddock Down

On 19th January 1643 Sir Ralph Hopton's Royalist forces camped at Boconnoc were surprised to discover a Parliamentarian army under the command of Lord Ruthin deployed on Braddock Down. Ruthin ordered an attack rather than waiting for the reinforcements under the Earl of Stamford to arrive from Liskeard. Hopton's forces won the battle securing Cornwall for the Royalists. Read More »

Bramber Castle

The ruin of Bramber Castle is reportedly haunted by ghostly children that have been witnessed there. They are supposed to be the children of William De Braose, 7th Baron Abergavenny, 4th Lord of Bramber, who displeased King John I and as a result had his children captured and starved to death Read More »

Brewer Street, Soho

It has been suggested that the apparition of Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, (Born 29 September 1758 – Died 21 October 1805) has been seen looking through the window of the building at the location where the upholsterer Mr Peddieson had his shop in the late 18th and early 19th century. Read More »

Brigham Church

Brigham Church is reputed to be haunted by a hangman named Joseph Wilson, who was interred in the churchyard in the year 1757. He committed suicide by throwing himself from the Cocker Bridge in Cocker Mouth. Read More »

Bristol Cathedral

Bristol Cathedral

The origins of Bristol Cathedral date back to 1140, when Robert Fitzharding(e) founded St Augustine’s Abbey on the Deanery Road site and it is a phantom monk that is said to remain and haunt the building. This abbey was designed in the Norman style though very little of this remains today, though the gatehouse and chapterhouse are 12th century. Read More »

Bristol Old Vic

Bristol Old Vic

Work commenced on the construction of The Theatre Royal, Bristol (home of ‘The Bristol Old Vic’ theatre company) in 1764 and the first performance was held there on 30th May 1766.  According to a 2002 Bristol Evening News article; ‘the old Bristol theatre is reportedly haunted by the ghost of actress Sarah Siddons and her repeat performances at the theatre are the stuff Read More »

British Museum Underground Railway Station

British Museum Station

Opened on 30 July 1900, British Museum Station at Bury Place served the Central Line on London’s underground rail network. The station was closed on 25 September 1933 when platforms for the Central Line opened at the nearby Holborn Station. Read More »

Broadford Skye

According to tradition recorded by Alasdair Alpin MacGregor (The Supernatural Highlands, Francis Thompson) a doctor holidaying at an Inn in Broadford on Skye witnessed a strange apparition by the sea. He was walking along the shore when he noticed a glow out to sea the glow came closer and as it did so became the figure of a woman in a cloak carrying a child. Read More »

Broadwick Street, London

Broadwick Street was originally known as Broad Street and apart from being the site of a major outbreak of Cholera on 31 August 1854, about a hundred years earlier an apparitional experience was reported here. The following account of the experience was published in 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain' (1897) by John Ingram. Read More »

The Brocket Arms, Ayot St Lawrence

This old pub, parts of which date to the 14th Century, was a stop of point for pilgrims on their way to St Albans Abbey. It is not far from Minsden Chapel, which is also haunted. A local legend suggests a tunnel exists from the pub to the Chapel or to the ruined church in the village, which is most likely a memory of the route taken by pilgrims. Read More »

Brodick Castle

Brodick Castle

A seat of the Dukes of Hamilton in the 19th century, there has been a fortification on the site of the present castle for over a thousand years. It was an important Viking stronghold, and swapped English and Scottish hands during the Wars of Independence. Oliver Cromwell also left his mark here. Read More »

The Brown Lady of Raynham Hall

Raynham Hall Brown Lady

The Brown Lady of Raynham Hall is one of the most famous hauntings in Britain, this is mainly down to the strange form captured by photographers from Country Life magazine in 1936. Before that event the Brown Lady had been reported several times, but many of the written accounts vary considerably. Read More »

Brownsover Hall Hotel

Brownsover Hall Hotel is a Grade II listed 19th century mansion house with a reputation of being haunted. The original house is associated with the Boughton (of Lawford Hall) and Leigh families. Read More »

Bruce Castle

Bruce Castle

Now a museum, Bruce Castle, which was formerly known as Lordship House is a Grade I listed manor house dating from the 16th century. It is associated with an anniversary ghost identified as Lady Constantia Coleraine who committed suicide in the late 1600’s and is said to be seen screaming and jumping to her death from an upstairs balcony. Read More »

Brundon Hall

The collection of ghost stories known as 'The Ingoldsby Legends' were written by Rev Richard Harris Barham (Born 6 December 1788 – Died17 June 1845) under the psuedonymn of Thomas Ingoldsby of Tappington Manor. His son wrote about his life which included the following experience concerning the Grade II listed Brundon Hall taken from Rev Barham's diary. Read More »

The Brushmakers Arms, Upham

This building dates back over 600 years and has seen many uses. Apart from being a pub, it has been a private house, a school and also a brushmakers which is where it's name originates. It is though that the pub may be haunted by Mr Chicket, who is thought to be the original brushmaker. Read More »

Bryn Hall

Bryn Hall was haunted by the ghost of a headless horseman. The haunting is said to have ceased after one of the servants received a message from the horseman pertaining to the location of a buried body.

The body was that of an illegitimate child belonging to the Lord of the hall.

Bryn Terrace, Llanelli

According to 'Phantoms Legends, Customs and Superstitions Of The Sea' (1972) by Raymond Lamont Brown; 'In 1955 Jack Rees was a 26-year-old steel erector employed at Carmarthen Bay Power Station. At the time of his brush with this phantom he was living at a house in Bryn Terrace, Llanelly with his 23-year-old wife and son of seven. Read More »

Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace has been the official residence of the reigning British monarch since 1837 when Queen Victoria (Born 24 May 1819 – Died 22 January 1901) ascended to the throne. There are a few ghost stories attached to Buckingham Palace but I am unsure of how genuine they are and I have not heard any witness accounts. Read More »

Buckinghamshire Revenant

The following by the Augustinian Canon William Parvus, also known as William of Newburgh (or Newbury) (Born 1136 – Died 1198) concerns a haunting or what is sometimes considered a potential vampire case. Read More »

Bullace Lane, Dartford

According to ‘Some Notes on the Road from London to Canterbury in the Middle Ages’ (1898) Edited by Henry Littlehales ‘The ancient house at the corner of the lane on the left a few yards before we reach the church*, is thus mentioned in Mr, Dunkin's history : —
Read More »

Burnham Green

The area is said to be haunted by headless horses, especially in the vicinity of a sunken lane to Welwyn village.

Sunken lanes are trackways, which pass below the level of the surrounding countryside, often with steep banks. Many are considered very ancient, the remnants of old trackways perhaps dating as far back as the Bronze Age. Read More »

Bwgan Pant-y-Wennol

In his excellent book 'Haunted Wales: A Guide to Welsh Ghostlore', Richard Holland quotes the following article concerning a poltergeist at Pant-y-Wennol near Abersoch that appeared in the Caernarvon & Denbigh Herald, 29 May 1866. Read More »

Cadogan Hotel, Knightsbridge

Lillie Langtry 1875

The sixty five room Cadogan Hotel is one of the oldest and most famous hotels in London and is reputedly haunted by the actress and lover of King Edward VII, Lillie Langtry (born 13 October 1853 – died 12 February 1929). Read More »



Share/Save

Navigation

Recent comments

Featured Site