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Ceddesfield Hall

Ceddesfield Hall is a Grade II listed building dating from the 18thcentury. Now a community centre, Ceddesfield Hall was originally built as a rectory for Reverend George Barrington. The previous rectory which this replaced burned down in 1793. It was this older building that was associated with the ‘Pickled Parson’. Read More »

Cessnock Castle

The castle dates from the 15th century, and was a stronghold of the Campbell's. The castle was converted to a mansion house much later in its history. Read More »

Chance To Be Part Of Project Albion

ASSAP (The Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) in partnership with Mysterious Britain & Ireland is opening up its long running Project Albion to enable members of the public to directly contribute towards it. Read More »

Chapel Farm, St. Leonards

The following extract is taken from Cholesbury-cum-st Leonards Local History Group Newsletter No 17 2013 – 2014, and concerns an article by Anne Batchelor tracing back her Tudor ancestors to Chapel Farm and her good relationship with the family who now own it now. Read More »

Chapman Haunting, Cheshunt

Protecting the names of witnesses and the identity of a haunted location is a good and ethical practice for investigators to adhere to, however, sometimes it does make identifying historic cases difficult. The following account is taken from 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain' by John Ingram (1897). Read More »

Chartwell

Chartwell was bought in 1922 by Sir Winston Churchill (Born 30 November 1874 – Died 24 January 1965) and his wife Clementine (née Hozier, Born 1 April 1885 – Died 12 December 1977). Chartwell was their principal adult home and was presented to the National Trust following the death of Sir Winston in 1965. Read More »

Chaucer Road, Bedford

The following extract is taken from an article by Andrew Watt entitled ‘15 ghost sightings in Bedford’, which was published in ‘Bedfordshire on Sunday’ (10 March 2015). ‘In 1972, a mother living in Chaucer Road who was woken by her baby's screams, spotted a shadowy hand cross the wall of the room and come to rest on the baby's face. Read More »

Chelmsford’s Civic Theatre

The Civic Theatre in Chelmsford which hosted its first production on 3 September 1962 is reputedly haunted. The following description was published on 13 October 2014 in the Essex Chronicle within an article by Emily Talbut entitled ‘The 14 most haunted places in Essex to visit this Hallowe'en’. Read More »

Chingford Mount Cemetery

Dating from 1884, the 41.5 acres Chingford Mount Cemetery is reputedly haunted and was mentioned in a 2005 article by Mark Killiner on the Guardian website entitled 'Things that go bump in the night'. Read More »

Cholesbury Camp

The oval shaped Cholesbury Camp or The Danish Camp is a multivallate Iron Age hill fort covering 15 acres with ramparts measuring between 9.5 ft. and 34 ft in height. Within the defences can be found the Church of St Lawrence and if stories are to be believed, phantom animals that have been heard snorting and fighting each other.

Christ Church, Greyfriars

Christchurch

There is a tradition that during the Victorian times a Night Watchman came across the ghosts of two beautiful ladies in the ancient burial ground of Greyfriars. The two ladies had haunted the site oblivious of each other for centuries, but, once they noticed each other and saw that they were of equal beauty, they got angry and started to fight. Read More »

Christchurch Priory

Although there has been a church situated on this site since around 800AD, the current building was started in 1094 by Ranulf Flambard.

Strange noises have been heard within the church that do not seem to have a physical source. There are also reports of phantom monks.

Church Ghost, Whitechapel (1864)

On 6 January 2010 the Shields Gazzette published the following article entitled ‘Crowds flock to see church spectre’. It concerns the reporting of an apparition in the 19th century outside an unnamed Whitechapel church. Read More »

Church Hill, Crowborough

There is a siting legend associated with The Church of St John the Evangelist, whch was consecrated on 31 July 1839. The orignal site that was chosen is said to have been to the West, on Church Hill near Friar's Gate. As with other siting legends the stones would be moved each night and positioned in the current spot. Read More »

Church of St John the Baptist, Northorpe

According to tradition, the churchyard of the Grade I listed St John the Baptist’s Church in Northorpe was reputedly haunted by a black dog. In County Folk-Lore, By Mrs Gutch and Mabel Peacock, 1908 they state that the dog ‘went by the well-known name of the Bargest’. Read More »

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Astley

The Coventry Telegraph published the following story entitled ‘Riddle of the Astley ghostly monk’ on 21 April 2008. 'TURN right at the first crossroads you come to as you follow the B4102 southwest out of Nuneaton towards Meriden and you will find the small hamlet of Astley. Read More »

Church of St Mor and St Deiniol, Llanfor

The Grade II listed listed of Church of St Mor and St Deiniol in Llanfor is no longer a place of worship and has been recently been advertised for sale. Built in 1875 on the site of a much older building, possibly the oldest church in Merioneth. It is possible that this older church was reputed to have been haunted. Read More »

Church of St Peter and St Paul, Ellesborough

The Parish Church of St Peter and St Paul in Ellesborough is a Grade II listed building dating from around the late 14 century. It was suggested by Gerald Line in 'The Church on the Hill' that a figure seen in the church wearing 17th century clothing was Rev Robert Wallis, rector here between 1635 – 1637 and 1665 – 1667. Read More »

Church of the Holy Cross, Ramsbury

There is a local tradition that the Church of the Holy Cross in Ramsbury is one of the locations haunted by the accused infanticide 'Wild' William Darrell of Littlecote House who died at Darr Read More »

Churchfield Wood, Turville

Churchfield Wood can be found North East of Turville Court and is thought to be haunted by Mary Blandy who was executed on 6 April 1752 for poisoning her father. Mary was known to have visited Turville Court, though not the current building which only dates from 1847. Read More »

Cineworld, Bedford

According to the following article extract from Andrew Watt’s ‘15 ghost sightings in Bedford’ (Bedfordshire on Sunday, 10 March 2015). Read More »

City Hospital, Birmingham

The City Hospital originally opened in 1889 as an extension to the Western Road workhouse and has been known by several names including Birmingham Union Infirmary, Dudley Road Infirmary and Dudley Road Hospital. Read More »

Clarence House

Clarence House was built in 1825 and is the official residence of His Royal Highness Charles, Prince of Wales (Born 14 November 1948) and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (Born 17 July 1947).  It was commissioned by King William IV (Born 21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) whilst he was the Duke of Clarence and designed by John Nash. Read More »

Claydon House

The spirit of Sir Edmund Verney, standard bearer to Charles I, is said to appear at the house in times of national crisis.

Sir Edmund was killed at the battle of Edgehill, and is reputed to have sworn that no man would take the standard that he bore without cutting his hand from his body. Read More »



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