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Apparitions


The Flask Tavern

The Flask Tavern dates back to the 17th century and has served the likes of Karl Marx (born 5 May 1818 – died 14 March 1883), William Hogarth (born 10 November 1697 – died 26 October 1764) (painter) and Dick Turpin (born 1705 – died 7 April 1739) (highwayman) who is said to have been hidden there for a while. Read More »

The Garricks Head, Bath

The Garrick’s Head at 7-8 St. Johns Place, Bath can be found adjacent to the Theatre Royal and is Grade II listed. Read More »

The George and Pilgrim Hotel, Glastonbury

Known as the George before the 20th century, The George and Pilgrim dates from the 1430's* and was originally owned by the Abbots of Glastonbury Abbey until its dissolution in September 1539. Read More »

The George Inn, Bathampton

The Grade II listed George Inn on Mill Lane in Bathampton dates from the mid late 17th century and is thought to be haunted by Viscount John Baptiste Du Barry who was killed on Bathampton Down on18 November 1778 during the last legal duel in Britain. His mortally wounded body is said to have been brought into The George Inn where he finally died. Read More »

The Ghost of Ann Walker

According to Arthur L Hayward's 'Lives of the most remarkable criminals: Who have been Condemned and Executed for Murder, the Highway, Housebreaking, Street Robberies, Coining or other offences' (1735), the ghost of Ann Walker named her murderer in the early 17th century.

An Account of the Conviction and Execution of Mr. WALKER, and MARK SHARP, for the Murder of ANN WALKER Read More »

The Ghost of Captain Davies, Nefyn

This is a ghost story from Nefyn, a town on the north coast of the Llyn peninsula with a strong sea faring tradition. One night, Captain Davies was apparently seen standing in the lamp light at the junction of Stryd Y Plas and Stryd Y Llan. Read More »

The Ghost of Dafydd Salusbury

The village of Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch, just off the A525 in Denbighshire has a rich history, and is also reputedly haunted. It is said that the ghost of Dafydd Salusbury has been seen galloping around the parish on a white horse at Midnight, and making terrible groaning noises. Salusbury was of local nobility, and was not liked by the local people, for his wicked ways.

The Ghost of John Chiesly

For three hundred years Dalry was reputedly haunted by the apparition of a screaming (and sometimes manically laughing) man with a bloody stump for his right arm. This ghost was known as ‘Johnny One-Arm’ or, more correctly John Chiesly. John was an unhappy husband who petitioned for a divorce in 1688. Read More »

The Ghostly Hand of Draycott

There is a story involving a ghostly hand that concerns the inheritance of Draycott Cerne Manor and arose when Sir Walter Long of Wraxall and Draycott Cerne (Born abt 1565 – Buried 30 October 1610) disinherited his eldest son and heir in favour of his eldest son by his second wife Catherine Thynne of Longleat. Read More »

The Globe Inn, Dumfries

Established in 1610, The Globe is traditionally haunted by a barmaid called Ann, who had an affair with Robert Burns. Burns made her pregnant and she bore him a child that she named Elizabeth. While Robert Burns was well known for his womanising ways it is not know if there is any truth in the story. Read More »

The Gloddaeth Ghost

The following extract concerning a ghost in Gloddaeth Wood (now Coed Gaer) appeared in 'Welsh folk-lore: a collection of the folk-tales and legends of North Wales' (1887) by Owen Elias. He obtained the story from Rev. Owen Jones of Pentrevoelas who was had received a first hand account from Thomas Davies of Tycoch, Rhyl, who appears in the tale. Read More »

The Golden Fleece, York

The Golden Fleece is a Grade II listed building which claims to be York's most haunted pub. According to their website 'Possibly the most famous ghost is Geoff Monroe, a Canadian airman who was staying at the pub in room four when he died in 1945, by throwing himself or falling out of one of the windows. Read More »

The Grapes Hotel

Grapes

In the village of Maentwrog on the A496, the Grade II listed Grapes Hotel is the local hostel. It was originally a 17th Century coaching inn but its cellar dates from the 13th Century. Read More »

The Grappa Wine Bar

The Grappa Wine Bar on Lansdown Road, Bath was originally a public house known as the Beehive which in the 1970’s had a reputation for being haunted by a friendly serving maid which the licensees referred to as Bunty. Read More »

The Grenadier, Knightsbridge

The Grenadier at 18 Wilton Row dates back to the early eighteenth century. Popular with Royalty and celebrities (King George IV, Madonna, Guy Ritchie and Gwyneth Paltrow) it was described by Guy Lyon Playfair in his Haunted Pub Guide (1987) as being “probably the most famous haunted pub in the world” and it is probably the one with its own sentry box outside. Read More »

The Griffin

The Griffin

The Griffin, built in 1679 was one of the first ships to sail on the Great Lakes and was used by the French Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle ( 22 November 1643 – 19 March 1687), to explore that part of Northern America. Read More »

The Highgate Vampire - How It All Began - by David Farrant

Highgate Cemetery

LONDON 1969, AND WIDE REPORTS WERE COMING INTO the British Psychic and Occult Society concerning a tall black apparition that had been seen lurking among the tombs of London's Highgate Cemetery. Most of these reports were from people who claimed to have been confronted by this apparition which invariably took the form of a tall dark figure and petrified people both in, or passing, the cemetery. Read More »

The Horns, Crucifix Lane

Suchards Bar & Thai Restaurant can now be found at 2 Crucifix Lane. Before Suchards it was known the Czar Bar and before that The Horns public house. The Horns dates back to the Victorian era and appears in the 1869 Post Office Directory, but it was in the mid 1960’s that it got a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

The Horror of Gyb Farm edited by Richard Holland

Gyb Farm

Within this book, The Horror of Gyb Farm, Richard Holland has collated and edited the works of a pioneering and yet relatively unknown paranormal researcher, Frederick George Lee (born 1832-1902). Between 1875 and 1894 F.G. Read More »

The John Snow, Soho

The John Snow public house at 39 Broadwick Street was named after Dr John Snow (Born 15 March 1813 – Died 16 June 1858), who traced the source of the Soho cholera outbreak of 31 August 1854 to contaminated water from a pump on Broadwick Street (known as Broad Street prior to 1936). Read More »

The Kings Arms, Peckham Rye

Kings Arms

132 Peckham Rye was once the address of The King’s Arms public house, which was hit by a bomb during a World War II German air raid I which eleven people lost their lives. The pub was rebuilt and overtime eventually became a nightclub named Kings on the Rye before finally being demolished in the late 1990’s by a block of flats. Read More »

The Kings Head Hotel, Cuckfield

The Kings Head Hotel is no longer open for business and the building has been changed into a residential mews (Kings Mews). However, this hotel which dated from at least 1832 (when Pigot's Directory of Sussex showed James Webber as the landlord) had a reputation of being haunted by a ghost known locally as Geranium Jane. Read More »

The Llandoger Trow, Bristol

Llandoger Trow

The Llandoger Trow is a fantastic looking building which dates from 1664 and can be found on King Street, across from the Theatre Royal in Bristol. The pub has a long tradition of serving those connected with the arts and the men who worked the sea. It also has a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

The Lookout Inn, Lawe Top

The Lookout Inn stands opposite the partially reconstructed Arbeia Roman Fort which dates from around 120AD and served as a maritime supply base for the garrisons on Hadrian’s Wall. We probably should not be surprised to hear of a Roman ghost haunting The Lookout Inn. Read More »

The Lord Eldon, Knutsford

The 300 year old Lord Eldon public house is thought to be haunted by the ghost of Annie Sarah Pollitt, daughter of James Pollitt the landlord of the Lord Eldon in the late 19th century.  She was also, in 1864 crowned the first May Queen of Knutsford’s famous Royal May Day fair. Read More »



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